Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Qué

Venado de Cola Blanca Odocoileus virginianus

Observ.

navasalfredo

Fecha

Enero 2, 2016

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Azulejo Garganta Canela Sialia sialis

Observ.

mreynolds

Fecha

Junio 17, 2019 08:50 AM CDT

Descripción

The fledgling and several insects were impaled on barbed wire in a cow pasture and close to a hickory tree. A pair of shrike was observed visiting an active nest 20’ up in the tree.

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Observ.

dongminsung

Fecha

Abril 17, 2017 12:20 PM EDT

Descripción

Confirm?

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Halcón Esmerejón Falco columbarius

Observ.

anudibranchmom

Fecha

Enero 8, 2019 12:23 PM PST

Descripción

Experts - What is going on here? This male American Kestrel sure did seem to have the hots for this female Merlin. He kept trying to get close to her and even brought her a few treats (insects?) from the grass beneath the fence. She accepted the treats but didn't seem thrilled with the attention. However, when he flew off, she followed him...

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Qué

Cascabel de Diamantes Rojos Crotalus ruber

Observ.

mgruen

Fecha

Marzo 18, 2016 05:33 PM PDT

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Observ.

axakak

Fecha

Julio 8, 2017 12:09 PM PDT

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Aguililla Negra Mayor Buteogallus urubitinga

Observ.

javigonz

Fecha

Abril 24, 2018 10:05 AM CDT

Descripción

First sighting around 10:15-20am or so. Was alerted to this very large immature hawk by a mob of grackles that were after it. Bird soared and circled over the lots and continued north with grackles following it. Birder friend, Alex Lamoreaux showed up soon after and after relaying the sighting and jumping in the van to chase, we found the bird soaring over the Louie's Backyard area with the grackle mob in tow. Hawk then returned south and took refuge in the Sheepshead north lot. A bit later bird lifted off and circled the area for a bit and headed north out of sight. First suspicion was immature Common Black Hawk, but following better views, photos, and discussion by other birders present, we reached the conclusion that the ID is Great Black Hawk because of huge size, finely barred tail lacking thick black terminal bands, long legs that it dangled while soaring. White crescents were obvious nearing wing apex and white upper tail coverts were seen and photographed, differentiating it from Common Black Hawk. Coastal habitat and range fits better with Great Black Hawk than Common. ID Confirmed by expert, Bill Clark. Possible 1st US record following review. An incredible and totally unexpected bird!

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Pigargo Vocinglero Haliaeetus vocifer

Observ.

greglasley

Fecha

Octubre 21, 1998

Descripción

African Fish-Eagle
Shakawe, Botswana
21 Oct 1998

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Cálao Terrestre Sureño Bucorvus leadbeateri

Observ.

happyasacupcake

Fecha

Noviembre 28, 2016 06:05 AM SAST

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Observ.

outstar79

Fecha

Abril 23, 2017 08:39 PM AWST

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Qué

Eider de Anteojos Somateria fischeri

Observ.

terathopius

Fecha

Junio 12, 2015 12:52 PM HST

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Qué

Águila Cabeza Blanca Haliaeetus leucocephalus

Observ.

gwark

Fecha

Enero 21, 2008 04:24 PM AKST

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Qué

Monjita Americana Himantopus mexicanus

Observ.

greglasley

Fecha

Mayo 21, 2013

Descripción

Black-necked Stilt
Himantopus mexicanus
High Island,
Galveston Co., Texas
21 May 2013

A few stilts seemed to ignore me as I sat in my truck and foraged close enough that I could get some really nice portraits. What a beautiful bird!

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Halcón Peregrino Falco peregrinus

Observ.

terrilldactyl

Fecha

Octubre 14, 2017 08:59 AM PDT

Descripción

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Papamoscas Fibí Sayornis phoebe

Observ.

sheliahargis

Fecha

Octubre 21, 2017 10:55 AM CDT

Descripción

Not sure what is going on but this is the fourth birder that I know of who has had a phoebe perch on their binoculars or on their person at Commons Ford.

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Garza Morena Occidental Ardea herodias ssp. occidentalis

Observ.

jaykeller

Fecha

Febrero 7, 2016 11:56 AM PST

Descripción

View the sequence of 18 shots that document this Great White Heron's struggle with this fish at Bahia Honda!

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Qué

Cormorán Pío Phalacrocorax varius

Observ.

sea-kangaroo

Fecha

Febrero 28, 2016 01:12 PM AEDT

Descripción

Caught a baby ray!

Ray has its own observation here: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/2739571

Etiquetas

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Centzontle Norteño Mimus polyglottos

Observ.

tadamcochran

Fecha

Julio 14, 2017 09:23 AM CDT

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Gavilán de Cooper Accipiter cooperii

Observ.

johnkarges

Fecha

Noviembre 6, 2016 02:07 PM CST

Descripción

Melanistic juvenile (likely male based on size relative to the Great-tailed Grackle it was feeding upon). Verified by William Clark, and Lance and Jill Morrow. First observed by M. Silvas with me, and I shouted "melanistic Cooper's Hawk, OMG" as I identified the bird preliminarily, before submitting it to experts for review.
N31.070728 W-97.369269
JPK-2925

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Qué

Gaviota Pico Anillado Larus delawarensis

Observ.

jcefus

Fecha

Enero 7, 2018 04:49 PM EST

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Qué

Perico Monje Argentino Myiopsitta monachus

Observ.

gate2soumyajit

Fecha

Enero 6, 2018 04:35 PM EST

Descripción

they are native here. What I mean my native is, they have stayed back. and built a huge nest. There are lot many. I never counted.

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Vuelvepiedras Rojizo Arenaria interpres

Observ.

anudibranchmom

Fecha

Abril 4, 2017 04:48 PM PDT

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Jaguar Panthera onca

Observ.

greglasley

Fecha

Agosto 16, 2017 07:40 AM CDT

Descripción

On August 16, we witnessed what has to rank with one of the most incredible wildlife experiences I’ve ever had. Cheryl and I were on a trip with 6 other nature photographers and our leader. We had been in the Pantanal area of Brazil for about a week with 5 days along the Cuiaba River near Porto Jofre, looking for Jaguars and other photo ops. Our daily routine was breakfast at 5:30 AM and we took off on boats from 6 till about 11AM, lunch at noon at the lodge, then on the boats again 3PM till dark. Our group has 3 boats so just 3 people per boat so plenty of room for photo gear, etc. Over several days we had seen 10-12 Jaguars. Some were very good photo ops, some poor photo ops, some just glimpsed.

There are several lodges in the area and it is a popular place to visit for folks hoping to see Jaguars, so much like Yellowstone National Park, a crowd can gather when some significant wildlife is seen, but instead of car jams to see a Grizzly such as Yellowstone, this can be boat jams for a jaguar. I have seen as many as 22 boats, 70-100 feet off shore with lots of people in each boat taking photos of a sleeping Jaguar. BUT…that is not the end of the story! We were often in more remote areas of the rivers and inlets and streams more or less on our own looking for birds, etc., so lots of times there are no other boats around. The boat drivers all have radios, so if a Jaguar is seen, other boats are informed. We move 20-25 miles up and down the river to explore, so many times other boats are not close enough to arrive while a Jaguar is in view.

My limited Jaguar experience is that some are just sleeping and/or resting and mostly ignore the boats in the river. Others are walking though the edge of the forest near the river and when a boat becomes visible, the animal just vanishes back into the forest. This morning at about 7:30 AM our three boats were in an out-of-the way location, a mile or so apart. The boat I was in was photographing a Great Black Hawk when one of our other boats called us on the radio to say they had a Jaguar swimming in the river, apparently hunting, so we headed to that area. Apparently the Jaguar, with just its head visible, swam up to loafing Yacare Caimans and pounced onto a caiman which was about 6 or so feet long. The Jaguar and the caiman thrashed in the water with the Jaguar biting into the skull of the caiman. That is about the time our boat arrived, after the Jaguar had mostly subdued the caiman, but the caiman was still thrashing about. The Jaguar was up against a high dirt bank, still mostly in the water with a firm grip on the skull of the caiman and the Jaguar was not letting go. It was very dark and under heavy foliage and vines so I was shooting at 4000 and 6400 ISO but that was my only choice. Eventually the Jaguar was able to work itself and its prize away from the vines and it drug the caiman out of the water and up the dirt bank and eventually back into the forest to enjoy its catch beyond the curious and amazed eyes of the human observers. The caiman was as large or larger than the Jaguar. All I have to say is that a mature Jaguar is an incredibly powerful predator and watching this whole 15 minute episode is something I’ll not forget. What a beast!

This entire series was shot from a boat, perhaps 40 feet off the bank with a Canon EOS 7D Mark II and a Canon 100-400 IS lens in case anyone is interested.

Cuiaba River,
near Porto Jofre,
Pantanal,
Brazil
16 August 2017

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Qué

Martín Pescador Norteño Megaceryle alcyon

Observ.

greglasley

Fecha

Abril 4, 2017 08:26 AM CDT

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Qué

Vireo Ojos Rojos Vireo olivaceus

Observ.

chartuso

Fecha

Agosto 18, 2017 06:57 AM MDT

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Qué

Grulla Blanca Grus americana

Observ.

dpom

Fecha

Noviembre 12, 2017 08:42 AM PST

Lugar

Texas, US (Google, OSM)

Descripción

mated pair with one colt, Catching snakes and eating them. Caught and ate 8 snakes in under two hours.

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Observ.

dpom

Fecha

Noviembre 12, 2017 08:42 AM PST

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Halcón Fajado Falco femoralis

Observ.

greglasley

Fecha

Septiembre 18, 2006

Descripción

Aplomado Falcon
Falco femoralis
near Valentine,
Jeff Davis Co., Texas
18 September 2006
This is a released bird from the Aplomado Falcon hacking project. This juvenile bird was near a hack site. The 2nd image shows two birds in the same area.