31 de octubre de 2019

Identifying Tarantula Hawk by Species

Many thanks to Curator silversea_starsong for providing this information in an earlier message stream.

How do I differentiate the identification between two Pepis species that apparently inhabit the same geographic area? In particular: Pepsis mildei and Pepsis thisbe here in San Diego. From the photos I see orange antennae on the iNat example pics for mieldei, and black on the thisbe. Is that the indicator? Many thanks.

Jim Parker

31 Oct 08:33
silversea_starsong silversea_starsong
Hi Jim,
Yes antennae is the quick and easy way to separate these two. In San Diego you probably get chrysothemis and mexicana too. Both of these also have black antennae like thisbe, but the former has very reddish wings (not orange) and the latter has black wings. There may be some non-Pepsis tarantula hawks in the area but I've not heard of them. They usually look like thisbe but are a bit smaller and have no iridescent blue.

James

31 Oct 08:49
silversea_starsong silversea_starsong
Oh and mildei does not have a pale wing tip. It just has the dark band there. Chrysothemis has the dark band with no tip also. If the wings are damaged you might not be able to tell. Then there is pallidolimbata which has no dark band, but no one talks about this one. I wonder if it is actually in southern CA.

31 Oct 08:53
jwparker2 jwparker2
Many thanks!

31 Oct 08:57
silversea_starsong silversea_starsong
So quick summary:

Pepsis thisbe: large, black antennae, orange wings with dark band, and then a pale wing tip.
Pepsis mildei: smaller, orange antennae, orange wings with dark band, no pale tip.
Pepsis chrysothemis: smaller, black antennae, if red wings, easy -- may be more orange at times? Dark band, no pale tip.
Pepsis pallidolimbata: orange wings, no dark band, but pale tip.
Pepsis mexicana: large, entirely dark, more likely to be mistaken for other wasps like Sphex pennsylvanicus.

Hemipepsis et al: supposed to be small, maybe not much smaller than mildei, but with no blue iridescence. Real ID feature is the wing vein pattern, so just get good wing shots if you suspect anything.

31 Oct 09:00
silversea_starsong silversea_starsong
Here's a Hemipepsis from Riverside County, very clearly black with no blue iridescence. Looks small. https://bugguide.net/node/view/1322492

Ingresado el 31 de octubre de 2019 por jwparker2 jwparker2 | 1 comentarios | Deja un comentario

20 de septiembre de 2019

Photography With UV Light

From Alice Abela, a wildlife biologist from Santa Barbara County:

"Can you remind me how you image the specimen (scorpion) under UV such that the background isn't also lit? i'm thankful, - Marshal

alice_abela commented:

You need a black light with a 365nm wave length to illuminate the subject then do a really low intensity flash. This was a 2 second exposure at ISO 500. I set the flash on manual and probably had it at around 1/32 or 1/64. I usually have to play a bit with the exposure duration, flash, and ISO to find the combination that works best for the shot and I kind of paint the subject with the flashlight during the exposure to get even illumination. Hope this helps! a black light with a 365nm wave length to illuminate the subject then do a really low intensity flash. This was a 2 second exposure at ISO 500. I set the flash on manual and probably had it at around 1/32 or 1/64. I usually have to play a bit with the exposure duration, flash, and ISO to find the combination that works best for the shot and I kind of paint the subject with the flashlight during the exposure to get even illumination. Hope this helps!

Ingresado el 20 de septiembre de 2019 por jwparker2 jwparker2 | 1 comentarios | Deja un comentario

21 de enero de 2019

San Diego Plant Atlas


Thank you for posting observations of plants in San Diego County to iNaturalist. All observations, including yours, that have been added to the San Diego County Plant Atlas Project are providing valuable information about the distribution and diversity of plants in our area. At the San Diego Natural History Museum, we are excited about the increased depth of knowledge that will be available to scientists by integrating verified iNaturalist observations with scientific specimen data drawn from the Museum's herbarium database. To achieve the best results, we need your help. Please join the San Diego County Plant Atlas Project on iNat (if you haven't already). Once you are a member of the Project, navigate to your observations page in the Project and select "Yes" in response to the question "Do you want to make your private/obscured coordinates visible to the project curators?" This will allow more accurate mapping of species distribution for scientific study and to facilitate conservation of sensitive species.
You can find more detailed instructions at this link: https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B9vUMd8LwweVaEFYVV9xZWVPMUU
Thank you for your contributions to the expanding knowledge of the flora of San Diego County.

Ingresado el 21 de enero de 2019 por jwparker2 jwparker2 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

Reposted: Making Good Mushroom Observations

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LKF_pIY0Zpc

@tiwane helped produce this video, where curator Christian Schwartz @leptonia talks about tips for making good mushroom observations:
Tips for Observing Fungi for iNaturalist

Co-author of Mushrooms of the Redwood Coast, with @noah_siegel:
www.redwoodcoastmushrooms.org

Ingresado el 21 de enero de 2019 por jwparker2 jwparker2 | 2 comentarios | Deja un comentario

13 de enero de 2019

Repost: Mountain Lions

Mountain lion’s death on 15 Freeway near Temecula raises serious questions.
Not exactly user friendly for wildlife.

That matters because a young male mountain lion was killed near here recently on the 15. At least three have been killed in the area in the past 20 months.

https://www.pe.com/2019/01/12/carl-love-mountain-lions-death-on-15-freeway-near-temecula-raises-serious-questions/amp/

Posted by biohexx1 biohexx1, January 12, 2019 07:17 PM

Ingresado el 13 de enero de 2019 por jwparker2 jwparker2 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

05 de enero de 2019

04 de septiembre de 2018

Re: Rosy Boa (from cmpaugh)

Rosy Boa
Lichanura trivirgata
Northern Three-lined Boa (Lichanura orcutti)
-southern California, northwestern Baja California, and western Arizona
-pinkish-orange stripes
Rosy Boa (Lichanura trivirgata)
-south of the Gila River in central Arizona and south to southwestern Sonora, and from the Tijuana and Otay watersheds of extreme southern California south through the Baja California Peninsula
-dark brown stripes
https://tucsonherpsociety.org/inhabitants/rosy-boa/

Ingresado el 04 de septiembre de 2018 por jwparker2 jwparker2 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

06 de mayo de 2018

San Diego County Plant Identification

I have just been notified of the following helpful info for San Diego County:
Oftentimes many of us have no clue as to the the plant we have observed. Thus, many simply indicate "plants".
FYI - If you submit these as "vascular plants" as opposed to "plants", they will auto-update to the SD Plant Atlas project where others will see it and be able to provide an identification. We had to set up the project that way to exclude algae and the like, which are placed under Plantae on iNaturalist. Thanks!

Thanks to Jay Keller for the heads up!

Ingresado el 06 de mayo de 2018 por jwparker2 jwparker2 | 1 comentarios | Deja un comentario

20 de abril de 2018

Differentiate Fence Lizards from Side-Blotched Lizard...

Honestly, I could see little to no difference between photos of Fence Lizards and Side-Blotched Lizards...
alexb0000 provided the following guide for me:
The easiest way is their body scales, Fence Lizards are rough and slightly spiky while Side-Bloctched have smooth pebble-like scales. Side-Blotcheds also have a longer, pointier snout. If you haven't already, check out these galleries:
http://www.californiaherps.com/lizards/pages/s.o.longipes.html
http://www.californiaherps.com/lizards/pages/u.s.elegans.html
Also, to make things even more confusing, in the San Diego area we have a "subspecies" of the Fence Lizard:
The Great Basin Fence Lizard.
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/11118875

Ingresado el 20 de abril de 2018 por jwparker2 jwparker2 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario

11 de abril de 2018

Technical Scorpion Identification Info

Technical information shared in comments about DIFFICULT species identification with scorpions.
Invaluable for the serious scorpophile! From my resident expert Kari McWest Curator kjmcwest

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/903002

Ingresado el 11 de abril de 2018 por jwparker2 jwparker2 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario