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Fotos / Sonidos

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Rana Arbórea Gris Hyla versicolor

Observ.

benthebiologist

Fecha

Mayo 6, 2012 10:51 AM CDT

Descripción

A Gray Treefrog.

Ah, crypsis!

Fotos / Sonidos

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Observ.

benthebiologist

Fecha

Mayo 5, 2012 10:48 PM CDT

Descripción

Fowler's Toad.

I think this is a defensive "look-big" posture, possibly due to me bothering it to take this picture.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Observ.

benthebiologist

Fecha

Marzo 31, 2012 06:03 PM CDT

Descripción

A Southern Leopard Frog.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Observ.

benthebiologist

Fecha

Noviembre 5, 2011 04:05 PM CDT

Descripción

A Spring Peeper.

Peepers can be identified by the cross-shaped pattern on the back.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Sapo Americano Anaxyrus americanus

Observ.

benthebiologist

Fecha

Marzo 15, 2013 07:41 PM CDT

Descripción

Ah, the American Toad.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Observ.

benthebiologist

Fecha

Mayo 5, 2012 03:34 PM CDT

Descripción

The Black Ratsnake.

This individual was caught "red-handed" in the nest box of a wood duck.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Observ.

benthebiologist

Fecha

Agosto 15, 2014 10:33 PM CDT

Descripción

A Pygmy Rattlesnake.

Notice the reduced rattle at the tip of the tail.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Observ.

benthebiologist

Fecha

Septiembre 7, 2014 02:45 PM CDT

Descripción

The Northern Watersnake.

This snake is commonly misidentified as a Cottonmouth, but is not venomous. (Although their musk is rather potent.)

Fotos / Sonidos

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Observ.

benthebiologist

Fecha

Septiembre 7, 2014 12:09 PM CDT

Descripción

An Eastern Yellow-bellied Racer.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Observ.

benthebiologist

Fecha

Septiembre 28, 2014 10:23 AM CDT

Descripción

The beautiful Copperhead.

These snakes are so cryptic with a forest-floor background, I've been looking right at one without seeing it before (until it moved). Simply incredible.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Rana Toro Lithobates catesbeianus

Observ.

benthebiologist

Fecha

Julio 17, 2014 03:26 PM CDT

Descripción

American Bullfrog.

Say hello to the Missouri state amphibian.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Tritón del Este Notophthalmus viridescens

Observ.

benthebiologist

Fecha

Octubre 2, 2014 08:45 PM CDT

Descripción

A juvenile of the Central Newt. Also called an eft.

Unlike most other salamanders, newts have a triphasic life cycle. This is the second stage. After metamorphosis the efts leave the pond and stay in the woods while they grow, later returning to the ponds to complete the transition into their adult phase.

They are brightly colored as a "warning sign" to predators that they are toxic.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Salamandra de Mármol Ambystoma opacum

Observ.

benthebiologist

Fecha

Octubre 2, 2014 09:05 PM CDT

Descripción

A Marbled Salamander.

These salamanders display a rather stunning silver-on-black saddle-like pattern on their backs.

One of two fall-breeding Ambystoma in MO.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Salamandra Anillada Ambystoma annulatum

Observ.

benthebiologist

Fecha

Octubre 2, 2014 09:34 PM CDT

Descripción

The Ringed Salamander.

This is an Ozark endemic. You can tell this is a male because of the swollen cloaca. (This guy was photographed in the fall.)

One of two fall-breeding Ambystoma in MO.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Culebra Verde Rugosa Opheodrys aestivus

Observ.

benthebiologist

Fecha

Octubre 1, 2014 06:10 PM CDT

Descripción

Rough Greensnake.

This snake is largely arboreal, spending most of it's time in the trees. The long and slender body form helps it wind from branch to branch without falling.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Observ.

benthebiologist

Fecha

Mayo 6, 2014 10:11 AM CDT

Descripción

A Slender Glass Lizard.

Often mistaken for a snake, these are actually lizards that have secondarily lost their legs (well, I guess snakes did too).

If you compare the face of this lizard to another lizard versus a snake, the difference is very noticeable.

They get their name "Glass Lizard" because they can, and will, break their tails off at the slightest stress, like they're "made of glass."

Fotos / Sonidos

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Observ.

benthebiologist

Fecha

Mayo 23, 2013 01:32 PM CDT

Descripción

Common Five-lined Skink.

This lizard is incredible common in MO, although most people identify with the juvenile form more than this adult.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Observ.

benthebiologist

Fecha

Mayo 23, 2013 01:38 PM CDT

Descripción

A juvenile Common Five-lined Skink.

What most people call Blue-tailed Lizards. Only the juveniles have the blue tail and bright lines on the body. These colors are thought to distract predators, drawing them to the tail (which can be regenerated) instead of the main body.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Huico Aspidoscelis sexlineatus

Observ.

benthebiologist

Fecha

Abril 28, 2013 03:09 PM CDT

Descripción

Six-lined Racerunner.

These lizards, as their name implies, are incredibly swift.

The only Whiptail native to MO.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Lagartija Espinosa de Las Praderas Sceloporus consobrinus

Observ.

benthebiologist

Fecha

Abril 28, 2013 12:01 PM CDT

Descripción

Formerly S. undulatus (Eastern Fence Lizard), this has been reclassified as the Prairie Lizard.

Very common in southern MO. Only the males gain the bright blue coloration on their underbelly during the mating season.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Eslizón de Tierra Scincella lateralis

Observ.

benthebiologist

Fecha

Abril 28, 2013 10:30 AM CDT

Descripción

The creatively-named Little Brown Skink.

Also called a Ground Skink.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Rana Grillo del Noreste Acris blanchardi

Observ.

benthebiologist

Fecha

Octubre 26, 2014 11:47 AM CDT

Descripción

Just a little-ol' Cricket Frog.

These are incredibly common across most of MO. The display a wide variation in coloration. This individual has a very nice red dorsal patch and striping on the hind legs.

Formerly A. crepitans.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Culebra de Collar Diadophis punctatus

Observ.

benthebiologist

Fecha

Octubre 26, 2014 04:15 PM CDT

Descripción

A Ring-necked Snake.

These little snakes have a very colorful ventral patterning, meant to deter predators (or photographers).

Fotos / Sonidos

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Observ.

benthebiologist

Fecha

Octubre 26, 2014 04:30 PM CDT

Descripción

Slimy Salamander.

This salamander gets its name, not because it's particularly slimy, but because, when attacked, it readily secretes a "slimy" substance to repel predators.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Observ.

benthebiologist

Fecha

Octubre 26, 2014 04:03 PM CDT

Descripción

The Ozark Zigzag Salamander.

An Ozark endemic, this species is only found in a small area in SW Missouri, NW Arkansas, and NE Oklahoma.

These little guys are very similar in appearance to the Southern Red-backed Salamander!

Fotos / Sonidos

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Culebrita Cabeza Negra Aplanada Tantilla gracilis

Observ.

benthebiologist

Fecha

Abril 28, 2013 10:43 AM CDT

Descripción

A Flat-headed Snake.

These small snakes are commonly found across the Ozarks under rocks in glades, where their flat heads help to wedge themselves into tight spaces.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Observ.

benthebiologist

Fecha

Abril 28, 2013 11:10 AM CDT

Descripción

The Wormsnake.

This little snake may have received its name because: 1) it lives under ground, like a worm; 2) it looks similar to a large worm; or 3) worms make up part of its diet. Pick which one you like best!

Fotos / Sonidos

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Culebra de Agua Vientre Claro Nerodia erythrogaster

Observ.

benthebiologist

Fecha

Mayo 5, 2012 01:06 PM CDT

Descripción

Hello! A Yellow-bellied Waternake.

Although the species name, erythrogaster, means "red-bellied", the Missouri subspecies is actually N. erythrogaster flavigaster. That clears up the confusion, right?

Fotos / Sonidos

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Observ.

benthebiologist

Fecha

Noviembre 6, 2011 02:11 PM CST

Descripción

Smooth Earthsnake.

This snake often is confused with the closely-related Rough Earthsnake - the primary difference being the keeling of their scales.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Qué

Falsa Coralillo Real Moteada Lampropeltis holbrooki

Observ.

benthebiologist

Fecha

Mayo 5, 2012 10:59 AM CDT

Descripción

Speckled Kingsnake.

Kingsnakes get the name "king" because they prey on other snakes. Kingsnakes are able to tolerate being envenomated by other snakes (such as the Copperhead) and emerge no worse for the wear!

Formerly L. getula.

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