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Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

ernesthwilliams

Fecha

Julio 6, 2020

Descripción

NUMBER: 20200706
SPECIES: Fox Squirrel, Sciurus niger Linnaeus,1758[1]
SUBSPECIES: Big Cypress Fox Squirrel, Sciurus niger avicennia Howell, 1919
SIZE, CONDITION, SEX: young, melanistic, unknown
DATE, TIME, DURATION: 6 July 2020, 4:46 pm, 20 min
LOCALITY: back yard 920 St. Andrew Blvd, Naples, Florida 34113
LATITUDE, LONGITUDE: 26°6’24.8” N, -81°42’55.1” W (26.1069, -81.7153)
IMPORTANCE: The melanistic female we were following had 2 offspring, a normal-colored one and a melanistic one.
COMMENTS: We have not seen the melanistic female since 19 April.

Table 1.[2] of female melanistic Big Cypress Fox Squirrel in Lely Palms[3]

Number Date Hour Duration Locality Latitude Longitude

20200213 13 Feb 9 am quick south of villa 26.1066, -81.7146
20200214 14 Feb 4:40 pm quick south of villa 26.1066, -81.7146
20200224 24 Feb 4:40 pm quick north of villa 26.1077, -81.7156
20200307 07 Mar 8:40 am quick backyard 26.1069, -81.7153[4]
20200410 10 Apr noon 20 min south of villa 26.1066, -81.7146[5]

[2]Casual and haphazard, not a systematic survey. [3]We have been following melanistic Fox Squirrels since 24 November 2019 (Williams and Bunkley-Williams, 2019) and one particular melanistic female since 31 December 2019 (Williams and Bunkley-Williams, 2020a). [4]Nancy Keogh sees this squirrel every morning near the Rattlesnake Hammock Road and St. Andrews Blvd site (26.1090. -81.7203). This must be the nest area. [5]The female was looking a bit ragged last time we saw her.

COMMENTS: The appearances of this offspring became so frequent that we stopped making records. Essentially, the female appeared with a small, normally-colored, offspring and this small melanistic offspring. Later in June, the offspring occurred together. Then, only the melanistic animal appeared 4-5 times-a-week for brief periods. We saw it once with an Eastern Gray Squirrel, Sciurus carolinensis Gmelin, 1788.
OBSERVERS: Dr. Ernest H. Williams, Jr.,[6,7,9,10] and Dr. Lucy Bunkley-Williams[6,8,9,11]
AFILIATIONS, ADDRESSES: [6]Extraordinary Professors, Potchefstroom Campus, North-West University, South Africa; Adjunct Professors, Research Field Station, Florida Gulf Coast University, 5164 Bonita Beach Road, Bonita Springs, FL 34134; [7]Dept. Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico (retired); [8]Dept. Biology, UPR (retired); [9]920 St. Andrews Blvd, Naples, FL 34113-8943; [10]e-mail ermest.williams1@upr.edu; cell 239-227-3645, ORCID 0000-0003-0913-3013; [11]Cell 787-467-2179, e-mail lucy.williams1@upr.edu, ORCID 0000-0003-1390-911x.
REFERENCE
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2019. A rare melanistic Big Cypress Fox Squirrel, Sciurus niger avicennia Howell, 1919, in Lely Palms, Naples, Florida. Research Quality Report, iNaturalist #36160838, 25 November (open access) [445][1]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020a. A tendency of melanistic Big Cypress Fox Squirrels, Sciurus niger avicennia Howell, 1919, in the population in Lely Palms, Naples, Florida. Research Quality Report, iNaturalist #37385466, 7 January (open access) [452][1]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020b. Melanistic Big Cypress Fox Squirrel, Sciurus niger avicennia Howell, 1919, expands range during pregnancy in Lely Palms, Naples, Florida. Research Quality Report, iNaturalist #38572575, 12 February (open access) [463]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020c. A melanistic offspring of a melanistic female Big Cypress Fox Squirrel, Sciurus niger avicennia Howell, 1919, in Lely Palms, Naples, Florida. Research Quality Report, iNaturalist #54888105, 30 July (open access) [516][1]
FOOTNOTES:
[1]Identification was peer-reviewed, text edited and condensed. The entire, original text is in our reprint #516.

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Libélulas Rayadoras Familia Libellulidae

Observ.

ernesthwilliams

Fecha

Julio 1, 2020 10:56 AM EDT

Descripción

NUMBER: 20200701
SPECIES: Blue Dasher, Pachydiplax longipennis (Burmeister, 1839)
DISTINGUISHING: Wings often folded forward when at rest, pale blue thorax and banded abdomen, eyes green, blue or black.
LOCALITY: Concrete pond and waterfall at Naples Botanical Garden, East Naples, Naples, Florida 34112 USA.
LATITUDE, LONGITUDE: 26°6’24.1” N, 81°46’41.9” W (26.1067, -81.7783)
DATE: 1 July 2020
DATA: iNaturalist #54802761
IMPORTANCE: none
KNOWN DISTRIBUTION: Very common and widely distributed from British Colombia to Ontario, USA, and Bahamas.
OBSERVERS: Dr. Ernest H. Williams, Jr.,[2,3,5,6] and Dr. Lucy Bunkley-Williams[2,4,5,7]
AFILIATIONS, ADDRESSES: [2]Extraordinary Professors, Potchefstroom Campus, North-West University, South Africa; Adjunct Professors, Research Field Station, Florida Gulf Coast University, 5164 Bonita Beach Road, Bonita Springs, FL 34134; [3]Dept. Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico (retired); [4]Dept. Biology, UPR (retired); [5]920 St. Andrews Blvd, Naples, FL 34113-8943; [6]e-mail ermest.williams1@upr.edu; cell 239-227-3645, ORCID 0000-0003-0913-3013; [7]Cell 787-467-2179, e-mail lucy.williams1@upr.edu, ORCID 0000-0003-1390-911x.

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Ambarina del Este Perithemis tenera

Observ.

ernesthwilliams

Fecha

Julio 1, 2020 11:56 AM EDT

Descripción

NUMBER: 20200701
SPECIES: Eastern Amberwing, Perithemis tenera (Say, 1840)
DISTINGUISHING: This very small (25 mm, <1 in) dragonfly is the only one resembling and actively mimicking a wasp with brown and yellow bands on its abdomen. The male has plain orange or amber wings (Fig. A); female wings darker or paler with dark marks. Both sexes have red pterostigmata (patch of cells in outer, leading edge of wings, Fig. A).
LOCALITY: Concrete pond and waterfall at Naples Botanical Garden, East Naples, Naples, Florida 34112 USA.
LATITUDE, LONGITUDE: 26°6’24.1” N, 81°46’41.9” W (26.1067, -81.7783)
DATE: 1 July 2020
DATA: iNaturalist #54800078
DISTRIBUTION: Occurs throughout the eastern USA, but also central part of the country. Very common in Florida, but no iNature reports for Naples. Judging from the iNature map, it seems to occur around major roads (observer artifact?).
IMPORTANCE: none
OBSERVERS: Dr. Ernest H. Williams, Jr.,[2,3,5,6] and Dr. Lucy Bunkley-Williams[2,4,5,7]
AFILIATIONS, ADDRESSES: [2]Extraordinary Professors, Potchefstroom Campus, North-West University, South Africa; Adjunct Professors, Research Field Station, Florida Gulf Coast University, 5164 Bonita Beach Road, Bonita Springs, FL 34134; [3]Dept. Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico (retired); [4]Dept. Biology, UPR (retired); [5]920 St. Andrews Blvd, Naples, FL 34113-8943; [6]e-mail ermest.williams1@upr.edu; cell 239-227-3645, ORCID 0000-0003-0913-3013; [7]Cell 787-467-2179, e-mail lucy.williams1@upr.edu, ORCID 0000-0003-1390-911x.

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

ernesthwilliams

Fecha

Julio 19, 2020 08:09 PM EDT

Descripción

NUMBER: 20200719
SUBSPECIES: Florida Cottonmouth, Agkistrodon piscivorus conanti (Gloyd, 1969:226)[1]
OTHER NAMES: Cottonmouth Water Moccasin; Water Moccasin;
DISTINCTIONS: Classic pit viper. Medium stocky snake with large, triangular flattened head with pits above the eyes, neck much narrower than head, and light cream-colored chin. Black stripe through eye with white above and below. Juveniles are brown or tan with darker, reddish brown crossbands with many speckles down the back, and a bright yellow tail.
SPECIMEN: 1 juvenile-adult transitional
DATE: 19 July 2020
LOCALITY: Winding Cypress, Naples, FL 34114
LATITUDE, LONGITUDE: 26°3’40.3” N, 81°40’26.4” (26.0612, -81.6740)
SIZE: lower jaw-vent 39.6 cm (1.8 ft); total length 1.0 m (3.3 ft)
DISTRIBUTION: Florida, southeastern Alabama, and south Georgia
DATA: iNaturalist #54688484
IMPORTANCE: none
OBSERVERS: Dr. Ernest H. Williams, Jr.,[2,3,5,6] and Dr. Lucy Bunkley-Williams[2,4,5,7]
AFILIATIONS, ADDRESSES: [2]Extraordinary Professors, Potchefstroom Campus, North-West University, South Africa; Adjunct Professors, Research Field Station, Florida Gulf Coast University, 5164 Bonita Beach Road, Bonita Springs, FL 34134; [3]Dept. Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico (retired); [4]Dept. Biology, UPR (retired); [5]920 St. Andrews Blvd, Naples, FL 34113-8943; [6]e-mail ermest.williams1@upr.edu; cell 239-227-3645, ORCID 0000-0003-0913-3013; [7]Cell 787-467-2179, e-mail lucy.williams1@upr.edu, ORCID 0000-0003-1390-911x.
REFERENCE:
<>Gloyd, H. K. 1969. Two additional subspecies of North American crotalid snakes, genus Agkistrodon. Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 82: 219-232.
FOOTNOTE:
[1]Identification was peer-reviewed, text edited and condensed.

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

ernesthwilliams

Fecha

Mayo 11, 2020

Descripción

NUMBER: 20200511
SUBSPECIES: Little-Bahama Curlytail Lizard, Leiocephalus carinatus armouri Barbour and Shreve, 1935[1]
OTHER NAMES: Northern Curlytail Lizard, Leiocephalus carinatus Gray, 1827 (species);
DISTINGUISHES: The only Florida lizard with its tail curled forward towards its back. Dorsal scales keeled and pointed, mostly terrestrial, medium-sized lizard.
DATE, TIME: 11 May 2020, 6:16 pm; observed there for around 24 hours and then disappeared from the area. This is similar to the disappearence of the iNaturalist #429 specimens.
PHOTOGRAPHS: by LBW of (Fig. A) adult on our concrete garage floor near front door beside a standard garden hose. Same animal (Fig. B) on cement sidewalk beside garage.
LATITUDE, LONGITUDE: 26°6’25.6” N, -81°42’55.1” W (26.1071, -81.7153)
DISTRIBUTION: The subspecies was endemic to Little Bahama Bank, Grand Bahama Island, and Abaco Islands, in the northern Bahamas. The species is native to the Bahamas, Cayman Islands, and Cuba.
COMMENTS: No one has taken us up on our suggestion of restoring this lizard in its former, native habitat (Williams and Bunkley-Williams, 2019). We have not learned if our suggestion of its demise in the Bahamas was accurate.
OBSERVERS: Dr. Ernest H. Williams, Jr.,2,3,5,6 and Dr. Lucy Bunkley-Williams2,4,5,7
AFILIATIONS, ADDRESSES: 2Extraordinary Professors, Potchefstroom Campus, North-West University, South Africa; Adjunct Professors, Research Field Station, Florida Gulf Coast University, 5164 Bonita Beach Road, Bonita Springs, FL 34134; 3Dept. Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico (retired); 4Dept. Biology, UPR (retired); 5920 St. Andrews Blvd, Naples, FL 34113-8943; 6e-mail ermest.williams1@upr.edu; cell 239-227-3645, ORCID 0000-0003-0913-3013; 7Cell 787-467-2179, e-mail lucy.williams1@upr.edu, ORCID 0000-0003-1390-911x.
REFERENCES:
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2019. Little-Bahama Curlytail Lizard, Leiocephalus carinatus armouri Barbour and Shreve, 1935, seems uncommon in SW Florida; suffered the first non-endangered, endemic subspecies extinction by a hurricane; and possibly could be re-established. Research Quality Report, iNaturalist #32985073, 18 September (open access) [429]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020. Another record of the, apparently rare in SW Florida, Little-Bahama Curlytail Lizard, Leiocephalus carinatus armouri Barbour and Shreve, 1935. Research Quality Report, iNaturalist #53794812, 20 July (open access) [514]

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Observ.

ernesthwilliams

Fecha

Mayo 14, 2020 12:02 AM EDT

Descripción

NUMBER: 20200514
SPECIES: Northern Curlytail Lizard,[1] Basiliscus carinatus
SPECIMEN: 1 adult female
SIZE: ~18 cm (~7 in) snout to vent
DATE: 11 May 2020
LOCALITY: 3471 Country Barn Road, Naples, FL 34112
LATITUDE, LONGITUDE: 26°7’16.0” N, 81°43’45.1” W (26.1211, -81.7292)
DATA: iNaturalist #53693433
REFERENCE:
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020. Another record of the, apparently rare in SW Florida, Little-Bahama Curlytail Lizard, Leiocephalus carinatus armouri Barbour and Shreve, 1935. Research Quality Report, iNaturalist #53794812, 20 July (open access) [514]

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Qué

Toloque Rayado Basiliscus vittatus

Observ.

ernesthwilliams

Fecha

Mayo 11, 2020 11:48 PM EDT

Descripción

NUMBER: 20200511
SPECIES: Jesus Lizard,[1] Basiliscus vittatus Wiegmann, 1828
SPECIMEN: 1 adult female
SIZE: ~15-18 cm (~6-7 in) snout to vent
LOCALITY: Lely Resort, 11 May 2020
LATITUDE, LONGITUDE: 26°4’38.3” N, 81°41’57.1” W (26.0773, -81.6992)
DATA: iNaturalist #53692488
REFERENCE:
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020. The introduced Jesus Lizard, Basiliscus vittatus Wiegmann, 1828 , appears to not be very abundant in, Naples, Florida. iNaturalist #53660881, Research Quality Observation, 19 July (online) [512]
ADDITIONAL DETAILS: see iNaturalist #53660881, Williams and Bunkley-Williams (2020), and iNaturalist #53693433.

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Qué

Toloque Rayado Basiliscus vittatus

Observ.

ernesthwilliams

Fecha

Julio 2, 2020

Descripción

NUMBER: 20200702
SPECIES: Jesus Lizard,[1] Basiliscus vittatus Wiegmann, 1828
OTHER NAMES: Brown Basilisk; Common Basilisk; Jesus Christ Lizard;[1] Northern Brown Basilisk, South American Jesus Lizard;[1] Striped Basilisk; Yellow-striped Basilisk
DISTINCTIONS: Large lizard (male up to 61 cm/24 in) Tail (2/3s of total length) and legs relatively long compared to body size. Male has a large, distinctive crest (casque) on the top of the head (small in female). Both sexes have a yellow stripe from the eye down the sides of the body unlike any other lizard in Florida. Female has black squares along the dorsal surface (back).
SPECIMEN: 1 adult male
DATE, TIME: 2 July 2020, noon
LOCALITY: Plants by concrete pond and waterfall at Naples Botanical Garden, East Naples, Naples, Florida 34112 USA.
LATITUDE, LONGITUDE: 26°6’24.1” N, 81°46’41.9”41.9 W (26.1067, -81.7783)
PHOTOGRAPH: by LBW
DISTRIBUTION: Native range is from central Mexico through Central and northern South America to Equador (Kryso et al., 2006). Introduced and established in SE Florida in 1976 (Wilson and Porras, 1983). Particularly occurs around fresh water. Kryso et al. (2006) noted this lizard had isolated populations north in St. Lucie County and west in Collier County. We have seen specimens in both of these counties. St. Lucie (mating large male and small female; 10 July 2017; 27.3315, -80.3392),[3] Collier (present report and ???). Flaherty and Friers (2014) found this lizard throughout south Florida.
BEHAVIOR: Can run on hind legs, particularly over water.[1] Aboral but also on low bushes and on the ground.
LIFESPAND: 3 years in the wild but usually only 1. Some say 6 years. 5-10 years in captivity.
DANGERS: Has toxins or enzymes that may cause lesions and/or infections on human skin but this has not been studied. Its lashing tail may cause minor injuries. Will bite fingers when caught or handled. Reported to eat bird eggs and fledglings but not designated as a harmful invasive.
USES: They are kept as pets but do not like being handled. Popular because cheap (US trade caught in south Florida) and easily fed insects. However, never tame, not the most spectacular Basilisk, and require large containers and rather complicated care.
DIET: Mostly consume insects and vegetation including berries.
SIMILAR SPECIES: The Cuban Knight Anole, Anolis equestris Merrem, 1820, is also a large, introduced lizard established in south Florida. However, it is light green in color.
IMPORTANCE: Do not appear very abundant in SW Florida.
OBSERVERS: Dr. Ernest H. Williams, Jr.,[4,5,7,8] and Dr. Lucy Bunkley-Williams[4,6,7,9]
AFILIATIONS, ADDRESSES: [4]Extraordinary Professors, Potchefstroom Campus, North-West University, South Africa; Adjunct Professors, Research Field Station, Florida Gulf Coast University, 5164 Bonita Beach Road, Bonita Springs, FL 34134; [5]Dept. Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico (retired); [6]Dept. Biology, UPR (retired); [7]920 St. Andrews Blvd, Naples, FL 34113-8943; [8]e-mail ermest.williams1@upr.edu; cell 239-227-3645, ORCID 0000-0003-0913-3013; [9]Cell 787-467-2179, e-mail lucy.williams1@upr.edu, ORCID 0000-0003-1390-911x.
REFERENCES:
<>Flaherty, J. P. and J. Friers. 2014. Predation on the Brown Basilisk (Basiliscus vittatus) in south Florida. Southeastern Naturalist 13: N57-N58. https://bioone.org/journals/southeastern-naturalist/volume-13/issue-4/058.013.0408/Predation-on-the-Brown-Basilisk-Basiliscus-vittatus-in-South-Florida/10.1656/058.013.0408.short
<>Krysko, K. L., J. C. Seitz, J. H. Townsend, and K. Enge. 2006. The introduced brown basilisk (Basiliscus vittatus) in Florida. Iguana 13: 24-30. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/267333729_The_introduced_brown_basilisk_Basiliscus_vittatus_in_Florida
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020. The introduced Jesus Lizard, Basiliscus vittatus Wiegmann, 1828 , appears to not be very abundant in, Naples, Florida. iNaturalist #53660881, Research Quality Observation, 19 July (online) [512]
<>Wilson, L. D. and L. Porras. 1983. The ecological impact of man on the south Florida herpetofauna. University of Kansas Museum of Natural History, Special Publication (9): vi + 89 pp.
FOOTNOTES:
[1]These names pertain to this lizard’s ability to walk, actually run, on water. Running on water is used to avoid predators and catch prey.
[2]Identification was peer-reviewed, text edited and condensed. The entire, original text is in our available reprint [512].
[3]Unfortunately, we did not obtain a photograph; therefore, did not report it.

Fotos / Sonidos

Square

Observ.

ernesthwilliams

Fecha

Mayo 28, 2011

Descripción

NUMBER: 20110528
SPECIES: Surgeonfish Isopod, Anilocra acanthuri Bunkley-Williams and Williams, 1981[1]
IDENTIFICATION: We described it (Bunkley-Williams and Williams, 1981) and is size, shape, position on host, and host specific to surgeon fishes.
LOCATION: Under pelvic fin is the normal attachment position for the female. This one was on the left side.
LOCALITY: off Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Florida 33308
LONGITUDE, LATITUDE: around 26°11’23.3” N, 80°5’22.6” W (26.1898, -80.0896)
HOST: Doctorfish, Acanthurus chirurgus (Bloch, 1787).
KNOWN DISTRIBUTION: Bunkley-Williams and Williams (1981) reported it from Puerto Rico, the U. S. Virgin Islands, Bahamas, and the Florida Keys on the Doctorfish. Williams and Bunkley-Williams (2020a,b) reported it from SE Florida.
DATE: 28 May 2011
OBSERVATION: Scuba dive from shore, not collected
OBSERVERS: Dr. Ernest H. Williams, Jr.,[2,3,5,6] and Dr. Lucy Bunkley-Williams[2,4,5,7]
AFILIATIONS, ADDRESSES: [2]Extraordinary Professors, Potchefstroom Campus, North-West University, South Africa; Adjunct Professors, Research Field Station, Florida Gulf Coast University, 5164 Bonita Beach Road, Bonita Springs, FL 34134; [3]Dept. Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico (retired); [4]Dept. Biology, UPR (retired); [5]920 St. Andrews Blvd, Naples, FL 34113-8943; [6]e-mail ermest.williams1@upr.edu; cell 239-227-3645, ORCID 0000-0003-0913-3013; [7]Cell 787-467-2179, e-mail lucy.williams1@upr.edu, ORCID 0000-0003-1390-911x.
REFERENCES:
<>Bunkley-Williams, L. and E. H. Williams, Jr. 1981. Nine new species of Anilocra (Crustacea: Isopoda: Cymothoidae) external parasites of West Indian coral reef fishes. Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 94: 1005 1047. Google Scholar [41] also: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/241572064_Nine_new_species_of_Anilocra_Crustacea_Isopoda_Cymothoidae_external_parasites_of_West_Indian_coral_reef_fishes
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020a. Surgeonfish Isopods, Anilocra acanthuri Bunkley-Williams and Williams, 1981, New State Records for Florida outside the Florida Keys. iNaturalist #48083390, Research Quality Observation, 31 May (online) [502]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020b. Surgeonfish Isopod, Anilocra acanthuri Bunkley-Williams and Williams, 1981, another record for Florida outside the Florida Keys. iNaturalist #48302605, Research Quality Observation, 2 June (online) [504]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020c. Surgeonfish Isopod, Anilocra acanthuri Bunkley-Williams and Williams, 1981, additional record for Florida outside the Florida Keys. iNaturalist #53338550, Research Quality Observation, 17 July (online) [505]
FOOTNOTES:
[1]Identification was peer-reviewed, text edited and usually condensed. The entire, original text is in our reprint #505.

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

ernesthwilliams

Fecha

Julio 8, 2020 06:02 PM EDT

Descripción

NUMBER: 20200708
SPECIES: Cuban Tree Frog, Osteopilus septentrionalis (Duméril and Bibron, 1841)[1]
DISTINCTIONS: Largest tree frog in Florida. May grow larger than 6.4 cm (>2.5 in). Has large toe pads, bulging eyes with an orange ting, and a wash of yellow at junction of legs and body. Usually has a warty, or bumpy, beige, or white, skin. Unfortunately, quite variable in color and pattern and can change colors. Young usually greenish or brownish with lines down their sides, reddish eyes, and blue bones clearly visible through undersides of their legs.
LOCALITY: Lely Resort, Naples, Florida, USA 34113
LATITUDE, LONGITUDE: 26º4’46.2” N, 81º41’49.2” W (26.0795, -81.6970)
DATE: 8 July 2020
COLLECTION: only photographed
RESEARCH: We collected introduced Cuban Tree Frogs in Puerto Rico for a graduate student stomach-contents study in the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez Biology Department.
IRRITATION: They have a horrible, loud call.
DAMAGE: Outcompete and consume native tree frogs and everything else they can get into their mouths. Climb up into electrical equipment and cause short-circuits.
DANGER: They secrete toxins that burn human eyes and may cause skin rashes and asthma-like conditions. May similarly harm pets or cause seizures.
REPORTED TO: Dr. Steve A. Johnson tadpole@ufl.edu 16 July 2020
OBSERVERS: Dr. Ernest H. Williams, Jr.,[2,3,5,6] and Dr. Lucy Bunkley-Williams[2,4,5,7]
AFILIATIONS, ADDRESSES: [2]Extraordinary Professors, Potchefstroom Campus, North-West University, South Africa; Adjunct Professors, Research Field Station, Florida Gulf Coast University, 5164 Bonita Beach Road, Bonita Springs, FL 34134; [3]Dept. Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico (retired); [4]Dept. Biology, UPR (retired); [5]920 St. Andrews Blvd, Naples, FL 34113-8943; [6]e-mail ermest.williams1@upr.edu; cell 239-227-3645, ORCID 0000-0003-0913-3013; [7]Cell 787-467-2179, e-mail lucy.williams1@upr.edu, ORCID 0000-0003-1390-911x.
REFERENCES:
<>Johnson, S. A. 2017. The Cuban Tree Frog (Osteopilus septentrionalis) in Florida. Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, UF/IFAS Extension WEC218. http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw259
<> Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2019. A report of the invasive and destructive Cuban Tree Frog, Osteopilus septentrionalis (Duméril and Bibron 1841), in Lely Palms, Naples, Florida 34113. Research Quality Report, iNaturalist #36506267, 9 December (open access) [449]
<> Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2019. Another report of the invasive and destructive Cuban Tree Frog, Osteopilus septentrionalis (Duméril and Bibron 1841), in Lely Resort, Naples, Florida 34113. Research Quality Report, iNaturalist #53306266, 16 July (open access) [513]
FOOTNOTES:
[1]Identification was peer-reviewed, text edited and condensed. The entire, original text is in our available reprint.[1]

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Falsa Jicotea de Florida Pseudemys peninsularis

Observ.

ernesthwilliams

Fecha

Junio 9, 2020

Descripción

NUMBER: 20200609
SPECIES: Peninsula Cooter, Pseudemys peninsularis (Carr, 1938)
ALSO CALLED: Pseudemys floridana peninsularis Carr, 1938. Unclear if this form represents a species or subspecies.
NUMBER; SIZES; WEIGHT; SEX: 1; straight carapace length 30.5 cm (12.0 in), curved 36.2 cm (14.25 in), width straight 22.2 cm (8.75 in), curved 28.0 cm (11.0 in); weigh 3.45 kg (7.6 lbs); size and anterior nail length suggests female. A relatively large old female.
DISTINCTIONS: Plain, yellow plastron (belly; Fig. D) with large black spots on edges (sides, Fig. E); numerous yellow stripes on carapace (top), legs, head, and tail (Figs. A,B,E).
LOCALITY: Lely Palms Road and St. Andrews Blvd near Fishtail Lake, Naples, Florida 34113
LATITUDE, LONGITUDE: 26°6′22.7″ N, 81°42′54.4″ W (26.1063, -81.7151)
DATE, TIME: 9 June 2020, 4:40 pm
KNOWN DISTRIBUTION: As the names suggest, endemic (only occurs) to the peninsula of Florida
COLLECTION/EXAM: Turtle was crossing the highway in a rainstorm. EHW ran out into traffic on 4-lane to pick up the animal (Fig. F). Cars were trying to avoid the turtle and almost causing accidents. Photographed, measured, weighed, and returned across the road toward the local lake (26.1061, -81.7154). Soon she walked toward the lake.
PHOTOGRAPHS: by LBW
USES: Aquarium trade, food, export
SOURCES: aquaculture, wild harvest
CONSERVATION STATUS:
SIMILAR SPECIES: The closely related and sympatric (occur together) Florida Red-bellied Cooter, Pseudemys nelsoni Carr, 1938, often basks with Peninsula Cooter. It differs by having a distinctive red-tinged belly (plastron) and red stripes on top (carapace); and 2 cusps (like teeth) on upper bill with notch inbetween. Florida, extreme SE Georgia, introduced Texas. IUCN Threatened, Georgia Imperiled.
OBSERVERS: Dr. Ernest H. Williams, Jr.,[2,3,5,6] and Dr. Lucy Bunkley-Williams[2,4,5,7]
AFILIATIONS, ADDRESSES: [2]Extraordinary Professors, Potchefstroom Campus, North-West University, South Africa; Adjunct Professors, Research Field Station, Florida Gulf Coast University, 5164 Bonita Beach Road, Bonita Springs, FL 34134; [3]Dept. Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico (retired); [4]Dept. Biology, UPR (retired); [5]920 St. Andrews Blvd, Naples, FL 34113-8943; [6]e-mail ermest.williams1@upr.edu; cell 239-227-3645, ORCID 0000-0003-0913-3013; [7]Cell 787-467-2179, e-mail lucy.williams1@upr.edu, ORCID 0000-0003-1390-911x.
REFERENCES:
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020. Rescue of a large Peninsula Cooter, Pseudemys peninsularis Carr, 1938, on St. Andrews Blvd, Naples, Florida. iNaturalist #51411988, Research Quality Observation, 29 June (online) [511]
FOOTNOTES:
[1]Identification was peer-reviewed, text edited and usually condensed. The entire, original text is in our reprint #511.

Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Magueyito Morado Tradescantia spathacea

Observ.

ernesthwilliams

Fecha

Junio 17, 2020

Descripción

SPECIES: Boat-lily, Tradescantia spathacea Swartz, 1788[1]
OTHER NAMES: Oyster-plant,[2] Moses-in-the-cradle
DESCRIPTION: Herb, erect or ascending; stems unbranched, short; thick leaves arranged spirally, blades purple underneath (abaxially) and green above (adaxially), sword or strap shaped, to 15-30 cm (6-12 in), leathery, succulent, glabrous (smooth, bare). Plant 30-46 cm (12-18 in) high, 30-61 cm (12-24 in) wide. Cultivars of various colors and leaf patterns.
LOCALITY: weeds in forest margin just east of dam on east side of Fishtail Lake, Lely Palms, Naples, FL 34113
LATITUDE, LONGITUDE: 26°6’22.0” N, 81°42’47.2” W (26.1061, -81.7131)
DATE, TIME: 17 June 2020, 2 pm EDST
COLLECTION: 2 plants (Figs. A,B) eradicated (dug up) and replanted among domestic Boat-lilies for comparison.
DISTRIBUTION: Native to southern Mexico, Central America, and West Indies. Introduced and naturalized in south Florida, Hawaii, Louisiana, Puerto Rico, and tropical/subtropical areas worldwide.
INVASIVE SPECIES: Global Invasive Species Database (IUCN); Florida Invasive Species Category II (Invasive but not modifying environment). Potential as dense ground cover to prevent other plants from spouting. Not confirmed in the wild.
OUR OBSERVATIONS: Rarely seen in weeds of forest margins. Does not appear very aggressive or successful. A common bedding plant in local gardens.
DANGER: Leaves slightly poisonous when ingested. Sap irritating to some peoples’ skin. Rather toxic to dogs. They may scratch until they bleed and require veterinary treatment.
USES: Popular bedding and potted plant. Component of cactus, succulent, and rock gardens. Edible tuber.[2] Herbal medicines in China and the Philippines, although of New World origin.
PHOTOGRAPHS: by EHW
OBSERVERS: Dr. Ernest H. Williams, Jr.,[3,4,6,7] and Dr. Lucy Bunkley-Williams[3,5,5,8]
AFILIATIONS, ADDRESSES: [3]Extraordinary Professors, Potchefstroom Campus, North-West University, South Africa; Adjunct Professors, Research Field Station, Florida Gulf Coast University, 5164 Bonita Beach Road, Bonita Springs, FL 34134; [4]Dept. Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico (retired); [5]Dept. Biology, UPR (retired); [6]920 St. Andrews Blvd, Naples, FL 34113-8943; [7]e-mail ermest.williams1@upr.edu; cell 239-227-3645, ORCID 0000-0003-0913-3013; [8]Cell 787-467-2179, e-mail lucy.williams1@upr.edu, ORCID 0000-0003-1390-911x.
REFERENCES:
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020b. Eradicating Boat-lily, Tradescantia spathacea Swartz, 1788, from the wild in Lely Palms, Florida. iNaturalist #51183918, Research Quality Observations, 24 June (online) [508]
FOOTNOTES:
[1]Identification was peer-reviewed, text edited and usually condensed. The entire, original text is in our reprint #508.
[2]Said to taste like oysters.

Fotos / Sonidos

Copyright infringement square

Observ.

ernesthwilliams

Fecha

Missing Date

Descripción

NUMBER: 20090821
SPECIES: Grouper Isopod,[1] Anilocra brillae Welicky et al., 2017[2]
NUMBER, DEVELOPMENT, SEX: 1, adult, female
LOCATION: On cheek under eye, which is the normal position.
LOCALITY: Copacabana Diving, Havana, Cuba
LATITUDE, LONGITUDE: somewhere around 23°9’1.9” N, 82°24’2.2” W (23.1533, -82.4006)
DATE: 21 August 2009
HOST: Coney, Cephalopholis fulva (Linnaeus, 1758)
PHOTOGRAPH: by Wolfram Sander, Copacabana Diving, Havana, Cuba
IMPORTANCE: New Country Record. Ortiz et al. (2003) actually reported this isopod from Cuba first, but as Anilocra haemuli Williams and Williams, 1981, which was then the correct name. We also made corrections to that paper (Williams and Bunkley-Williams, 2020a).
OBSERVERS: Dr. Ernest H. Williams, Jr.,[3,4,6,7] and Dr. Lucy Bunkley-Williams[3,5,6,8]
AFILIATIONS, ADDRESSES: [3]Extraordinary Professors, Potchefstroom Campus, North-West University, South Africa; Adjunct Professors, Research Field Station, Florida Gulf Coast University, 5164 Bonita Beach Road, Bonita Springs, FL 34134; [4]Dept. Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico (retired); [5]Dept. Biology, UPR (retired); [6]920 St. Andrews Blvd, Naples, FL 34113-8943; [7]e-mail ermest.williams1@upr.edu; cell 239-227-3645, ORCID 0000-0003-0913-3013; [8]Cell 787-467-2179, e-mail lucy.williams1@upr.edu, ORCID 0000-0003-1390-911x.
REFERENCES:
<>Ortiz, M., R. Lalana, and E. Suarez. 2003. New fish parasite copepod and isopod crustaceans (Crustacea), from the Cuban Archipelago, with the description of a new species of copepod. Avicennia 16: 78-82. https://archive.org/details/biostor-135587/page/n3/mode/2up
<>Welicky, R. L., K. A. Hadfield, P. C. Sikkel, and N. J. Smit. 2017. Molecular assessment of three species of Anilocra (Isopoda, Cymothoidae) ectoparasites from Caribbean coral reef fishes, with the description of Anilocra brillae sp. n. ZooKeys 663: 21 pp.
<>Williams, L. B. and E. H. Williams, Jr. 1981. Nine new species of Anilocra (Crustacea: Isopoda: Cymothoidae) external parasites of West Indian coral reef fishes. Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 94: 1005 1047. Google Scholar [41] also: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/241572064_Nine_new_species_of_Anilocra_Crustacea_Isopoda_Cymothoidae_external_parasites_of_West_Indian_coral_reef_fishes
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020a. Suggestions for “New fish parasite copepod and isopod crustaceans (Crustacea), from the Cuban Archipelago, with the description of a new species of copepod. Avicennia 16: 78-82.” Avicennia https://archive.org/details/biostor-135587/page/n3/mode/2up [507]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020b. A New Country Record for the Grouper Isopod,[1] Anilocra brillae Welicky et al., 2017, in Cuba. iNaturalist #48507005, Research Quality Observation, 4 June (online) [506][2]
FOOTNOTES:
[1]Suggested New Common Name
[2]Identification was peer-reviewed, text edited and usually condensed. The entire, original text is in our reprint #506.

Fotos / Sonidos

Copyright infringement square

Observ.

ernesthwilliams

Fecha

Agosto 11, 2014

Descripción

NUMBER: 20140811
SPECIES: Surgeonfish Isopod, Anilocra acanthuri Bunkley-Williams and Williams, 1981.[1]
IDENTIFICATION: We described it (Bunkley-Williams and Williams, 1981). Size, shape, position on host, host specific to surgeon fishes.
LOCATION: Under pelvic fin is the normal attachment position for the female. This one was on the left side.
LOCALITY: near Cigar Rock, on Big Coral Knoll(?), Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. South of Tower 17(?). None of these appear to be map localities.
LATITUDE, LONGITUDE: possibly somewhere around 26°6’7.6” N, 80°5’56.4” W (26.1021, -80.0990)
DATE: 11 August 2014
HOST: Doctorfish, Acanthurus chirurgus (Bloch, 1787)
KNOWN DISTRIBUTION: We (Bunkley-Williams and Williams, 1981) reported it from Puerto Rico, the U. S. Virgin Islands, Bahamas, and the Florida Keys on the Doctorfish.
PHOTOGRAPH: by Michael Kovach, Cordova Diving (out of business). This is a one-time, non-profit, scientific use for identification.
OBSERVERS: Dr. Ernest H. Williams, Jr.,[2,3,5,6] and Dr. Lucy Bunkley-Williams[2,4,5,7]
AFILIATIONS, ADDRESSES: [2]Extraordinary Professors, Potchefstroom Campus, North-West University, South Africa; Adjunct Professors, Research Field Station, Florida Gulf Coast University, 5164 Bonita Beach Road, Bonita Springs, FL 34134; [3]Dept. Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico (retired); [4]Dept. Biology, UPR (retired); [5]920 St. Andrews Blvd, Naples, FL 34113-8943; [6]e-mail ermest.williams1@upr.edu; cell 239-227-3645, ORCID 0000-0003-0913-3013; [7]Cell 787-467-2179, e-mail lucy.williams1@upr.edu, ORCID 0000-0003-1390-911x.
REFERENCES:
<>Williams, L. B. and E. H. Williams, Jr. 1981. Nine new species of Anilocra (Crustacea: Isopoda: Cymothoidae) external parasites of West Indian coral reef fishes. Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 94: 1005 1047. Google Scholar [41] also: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/241572064_Nine_new_species_of_Anilocra_Crustacea_Isopoda_Cymothoidae_external_parasites_of_West_Indian_coral_reef_fishes
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020a. Surgeonfish Isopods, Anilocra acanthuri Bunkley-Williams and Williams, 1981, New State Records for Florida outside the Florida Keys. iNaturalist #48083390, Research Quality Observation, 31 May (online) [502]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020b. Surgeonfish Isopod, Anilocra acanthuri Bunkley-Williams and Williams, 1981, another record for Florida outside the Florida Keys. iNaturalist #48302605, Research Quality Observation, 2 June (online) [504]
FOOTNOTES:
[1]Identification was peer-reviewed, text edited and usually condensed. The entire, original text is in our reprint #504.

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

ernesthwilliams

Fecha

Junio 1, 2020 11:32 PM ADT

Descripción

SPECIES: Gar Isopod, Anilocra acuta Richardson, 1910
DISTINCTIONS: Elongate, pointed “nose.” Pereon (thorax) elongated rectangle becoming wider posteriorly. Pleon (abdomen) abruptly narrower than pereon.
LOCALITY: St. James River at Jacksonville, Florida
LATITUDE, LONGITUDE: around 30°19’12.0” N, 81°39’0.0” W (30.32, -81.65)
HOST: Longnose Gar, Lepisosteus osseus (Linnaus, 1758)
LOCATION: Body and fins
KNOWN DISTRIBUTION: Coastal areas of every state Georgia to Texas, and New York. Williams and Bunkley-Williams (1999) suggested its range probably extends into Gulf coastal Mexico.
FLORIDA RECORDS: Alligator Harbor, lower Ochlockonee River, and Tampa Bay, Florida. All Gulf of Mexico localities (Bowman et al., 1977).
PHOTOGRAPHS: by Poly V. Weldon, A. Close up of inside of left pelvic fin with Gar Isopod attached. B. Gar Isopod attached inside left pelvic fin of a Longnose Gar
KNOWN HOSTS: Alligator Gar, Atractosteus spatula Lacepede, 1803; Chain Pickerel, Esox niger Lesueur, 1818; King Mackerel, Scomberomorus cavalla (Cuvier, 1829)(Prey-Predator Transfer; Williams and Bunkley-Williams, 1994, 1996); Spotted Gar, Lepisosteus oculatus Winchell, 1864; Silver Perch, Bairdiella chrysoura (Lacepede, 1802); Spot, Leiostomus xanthurus Lacepede, 1802; Longnose Gar (Williams and Bunkley-Williams, 1999).
DAMAGE: Overstreet and Hawkins (2017) question whether it is attracted to sick and injured gar or causes the injuries. Overstreet (1978) showed similar damage previously. Since it occurs on many apparently healthy fishes, we would guess it causes these wounds.
IMPORTANCE: There are very few reports of these isopods in the literature. This is the First Report of the Gar Isopod on the Atlantic Coast of Florida.

OBSERVERS: Dr. Ernest H. Williams, Jr.,[3,4,6,7], Dr. Lucy Bunkley-Williams[3,5,6,8] , Poly V. Weldon, Veterinary Student, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, pweldon@ufl.edu
AFILIATIONS, ADDRESSES: [3]Extraordinary Professors, Potchefstroom Campus, North-West University, South Africa; Adjunct Professors, Research Field Station, Florida Gulf Coast University, 5164 Bonita Beach Road, Bonita Springs, FL 34134; [4]Dept. Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico (retired); [5]Dept. Biology, UPR (retired); [6]920 St. Andrews Blvd, Naples, FL 34113-8943; [7]e-mail ermest.williams1@upr.edu; cell 239-227-3645, ORCID 0000-0003-0913-3013; [8]Cell 787-467-2179, e-mail lucy.williams1@upr.edu, ORCID 0000-0003-1390-911x.
REFERENCES:
<>Bowman, T. E., S. A. Grabe, and J. H. Hecht. 1977. Chesapeake Science 18: 390-393.
<>Overstreet, R. M. 1978. Marine maladies? Worms, germs, and other symbionts from the northern Gulf of Mexico. Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium, MASGP-78-021. 140 pp.
<>Overstreet, R. M., and W. E. Hawkins. 2017. Diseases and mortalities of fishes and other animals in the Gulf of Mexico. Pages 1589-1738, In: C. Ward (Ed.) Habitats and biota of the Gulf of Mexico: Before the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill. Springer, New York, NY. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-1-4939-3456-0_6
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 1994. Four cases of unusual crustacean-fish associations and comments on parasitic processes. Journal of Aquatic Animal Health 6: 202-208. Google Scholar [156]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 1996. Parasites of offshore, big game sport fishes of Puerto Rico and the western North Atlantic. Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources, San Juan, Puerto Rico, and Department of Biology, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez, Puerto Rico, 384 pp. (book). [also Caribbean Journal of Science Special Publication 9: www.caribjsci.org/publications.html; http://www.uprm.edu/biology/cjs/biggamefish.pdf] Google Scholar [190]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 1999. Order Isopoda. Pages 310, 325-331, 353, 359-360, 375, 377, 379, 383-385, 396, 402, 404-408 In: G. L. Hoffman (Ed.) Parasites of North American freshwater fishes. Cornell University Press, Ithaca, New York, USA, 539 pp. [244]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr., P. V. Weldon, and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020. First Atlantic coast of Florida Record for the Gar Isopod, Anilocra acuta Richardson, 1910. iNaturalist #48199605, Research Quality Observations, 1 June (online) [501]
FOOTNOTES:
[1]Identification was peer-reviewed, text edited and usually condensed. The entire, original text is in our reprint #501.

Fotos / Sonidos

Copyright infringement square

Observ.

ernesthwilliams

Fecha

Mayo 31, 2020 11:32 PM ADT

Descripción

SPECIES: Surgeonfish Isopod,[1] Anilocra acanthuri Bunkley-Williams and Williams, 1981.[2]
IDENTIFICATION: We described it (Bunkley-Williams and Williams, 1981). Size, shape, position on host, host specific to surgeon fishes.
LOCATION: Under pelvic fin is the normal attachment position for the female. This one was on the left side.
LOCALITY: Dearfield Beach Pier, 200 NE 21st Avenue, Dearfield Beach, Florida 33441
LATITUDE, LONGITUDE: around 26°18’59.04” N, 80°4’22.08” W (26.3164, -80.0728)
HOST: Doctorfish, Acanthurus chirurgus (Bloch, 1787), was not identified on the webpage (DFB, 2020). The spine on the caudal peduncle, bars on the body, shape, and color are diagnostic.
KNOWN DISTRIBUTION: We (Bunkley-Williams and Williams, 1981) reported it from Puerto Rico, the U. S. Virgin Islands, Bahamas, and the Florida Keys on the Doctorfish.
PHOTOGRAPH: The photographer was not identified. No copywrite protection was stated. This is a one-time, non-profit, scientific use for identification.
SIMILAR RECORDS: (1) iNaturalist #1777, observed 2 July 2007, submitted 28 February 2009, also Dearfield Beach, 26.3273, -80.0718, photo shows female under right pelvic fin. EHW identified. (2) U. S. National Museum Invertebrate Collection, USNM 1198798, collected by Dr. Raymond E. Waldner, identified by us for USNM, 0.4 km north of Hilton Inn on Singer Island, Palm Beach County, 50 m offshore, 26°47’36.2” N, 80°1’53.0” W (26.7934, -80.0314)
IMPORTANCE: Identification of the isopods and New Records for Florida outside of the Florida Keys.
OBSERVERS: Dr. Ernest H. Williams, Jr.,[3,4,6,7] and Dr. Lucy Bunkley-Williams[3,5,6,8]
AFILIATIONS, ADDRESSES: [3]Extraordinary Professors, Potchefstroom Campus, North-West University, South Africa; Adjunct Professors, Research Field Station, Florida Gulf Coast University, 5164 Bonita Beach Road, Bonita Springs, FL 34134; [4]Dept. Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico (retired); [5]Dept. Biology, UPR (retired); [6]920 St. Andrews Blvd, Naples, FL 34113-8943; [7]e-mail ermest.williams1@upr.edu; cell 239-227-3645, ORCID 0000-0003-0913-3013; [8]Cell 787-467-2179, e-mail lucy.williams1@upr.edu, ORCID 0000-0003-1390-911x.
REFERENCES:
<>DFB. 2020. Isopod. Dearfield Beach Fish Guide
http://deerfield-beach.com/ImageRepository/Document?documentId=12984
<>Williams, L. B. and E. H. Williams, Jr. 1981. Nine new species of Anilocra (Crustacea: Isopoda: Cymothoidae) external parasites of West Indian coral reef fishes. Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 94: 1005 1047. Google Scholar [41] also: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/241572064_Nine_new_species_of_Anilocra_Crustacea_Isopoda_Cymothoidae_external_parasites_of_West_Indian_coral_reef_fishes
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2019. Life cycle and life history strategies of parasitic crustacea. Chapter 5 and Pages 179-266 In: N. J. Smit, N. L. Bruce, and K. A. Hadfield (Eds.). Parasitic Crustacea: State of knowledge and future trends. Zoological Monographs 3, Springer Nature Switzerland, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-17385-2 [417]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020. Surgenfish Isopods, Anilocra acanthuri Bunkley-Williams and Williams, 1981, New State Records for Florida outside the Florida Keys. iNaturalist #48083390, Research Quality Observation, 31 May (online) [502]
FOOTNOTES:
[1]Suggested New Common Name
[2]Identification was peer-reviewed, text edited and usually condensed. The entire, original text is in our reprint #502.

Fotos / Sonidos

Copyright infringement square

Observ.

ernesthwilliams

Fecha

Mayo 18, 2020 07:17 PM ADT

Descripción

NUMBER: 20200518[1]
SPECIES: Blackbar Soldierfish Isopod, Anilocra myripristis Bunkley-Williams and Williams, 1981[2]
SPECIMEN NUMBER; SEX & DEVELOPMENT: 3; (foreground fish)1 adult female, 1 micromale (juvenile) (Williams and Bunkley-Williams, 2019); (background fish) 1 adult female
DISTINCTIONS: Only occurs on the Blackbar Soldierfish, Mypristis jacobus Cuvier, 1829, in The West Indies and south Florida (USA) (Bunkley-Williams and Williams, 1981).
DATE, TIME:
LOCALITY: Roatán Divers, West End (746.44 mi), Islas De La Bahia, Roatán, Honduras 34101
LATITUDE, LONGITUDE: around 16°18’0.0” N, 86°36’36.0” W (16.30, -86.61)
DIVE, PHOTO DEPTHS: unknown
LOCATION: Females only on top of head; sometimes micromales (juveniles) under or beside females (Bunkley-Williams and Williams, 1981; Williams and Bunkley-Williams, 2019)
HOST: Blackbar Soldierfish
PHOTOGRAPH: Irma Korb. Marked advertisement/preview copy. Not a complimentary copy. One time use for scientific identification.
DISTRIBUTION: We described this isopod from Puerto Rico and a few adjacent areas. Since then, we have seen it elsewhere. However, we cannot search everywhere. Reports and photographs from others are very useful in determining the exact geographic range of this isopod and its significance.
PARALELL EVOLUTION?: Similar Anilocra spp. occur on the tops of the heads of Soldierfishes, Myripristis spp., in the IndoPacific. These occurrences are very interesting and should be compared.
IMPORTANCE: New Country Record (Honduras).
OBSERVERS: Dr. Ernest H. Williams, Jr.,[3,4,6,7] and Dr. Lucy Bunkley-Williams[3,5,6,8]
AFILIATIONS, ADDRESSES: [3]Extraordinary Professors, Potchefstroom Campus, North-West University, South Africa; Adjunct Professors, Research Field Station, Florida Gulf Coast University, 5164 Bonita Beach Road, Bonita Springs, FL 34134; [4]Dept. Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico (retired); [5]Dept. Biology, UPR (retired); [6]920 St. Andrews Blvd, Naples, FL 34113-8943; [7]e-mail ermest.williams1@upr.edu; cell 239-227-3645, ORCID 0000-0003-0913-3013; [8]Cell 787-467-2179, e-mail lucy.williams1@upr.edu, ORCID 0000-0003-1390-911x.
REFERENCES:
<>Bunkley-Williams, L. B. and E. H. Williams, Jr. 1981. Nine new species of Anilocra (Crustacea: Isopoda: Cymothoidae) external parasites of West Indian coral reef fishes. Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 94: 1005 1047. Google Scholar [41]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2019. Life cycle and life history strategies of parasitic crustacea. Chapter 5 and Pages 179-266 In: N. J. Smit, N. L. Bruce, and K. A. Hadfield (Eds.). Parasitic Crustacea: State of knowledge and future trends. Zoological Monographs 3, Springer Nature Switzerland, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-17385-2 [417]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020a. New Country Record for the Blackbar Soldierfish Isopod, Anilocra myripristis Bunkley-Williams and Williams, 1981, on the Blackbar Soldierfish, Mypristis jacobus Cuvier, 1829, in Honduras. iNaturalist #46438471, Research Quality Observations, 18 May (online) [500][2]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020b. New Country Record for the Blackbar Soldierfish Isopod, Anilocra myripristis Bunkley-Williams and Williams, 1981, on the Blackbar Soldierfish, Mypristis jacobus Cuvier, 1829, in the Cayman Islands. iNaturalist #46253997, Research Quality Observations, 17 May (online) [499]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020c. New Island Record (Bimini) for the Blackbar Soldierfish Isopod, Anilocra myripristis Bunkley-Williams and Williams, 1981, on the Blackbar Soldierfish, Mypristis jacobus Cuvier, 1829. iNaturalist #46253997, Research Quality Observations, 17 May (online) [498]
FOOTNOTES:
[1]Date photograph was taken unknown. Date posted to iNaturalist.
[2]Identification was peer-reviewed, text edited and usually condensed. The entire, original text is in our reprint #500.

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

ernesthwilliams

Fecha

Missing Date

Descripción

NUMBER: 20150729
SPECIES: Blackbar Soldierfish Isopod, Anilocra myripristis Bunkley-Williams and Williams, 1981[1]
SPECIMEN NUMBER; SEX & DEVELOPMENT: 5; 1adult female, 4 micromales (juveniles) at 3 stages of development, which suggests 3 sources (Williams and Bunkley-Williams, 2019)
DISTINCTIONS: Only occurs on the Blackbar Soldierfish, Mypristis jacobus Cuvier, 1829, in The West Indies and south Florida (USA) (Bunkley-Williams and Williams, 1981).
DATE, TIME: 29 June 2015
LOCALITY: Bloody Bay Wall, Little Cayman, Cayman Islands
LATITUDE, LONGITUDE: around 19°40’48.0” N, 80°5’24.0” W (19.68, -80.09)
DIVE, PHOTO DEPTHS: unknown
LOCATION: Females only on top of head; sometimes micromales (juveniles) under or beside females (Bunkley-Williams and Williams, 1981; Williams and Bunkley-Williams, 2019)
HOST: Blackbar Soldierfish
PHOTOGRAPH: Underwater Imaging, Alamy Stock Photos, Figure A. FOGFWF, FIGURE B. FOGG9B. Marked advertisement/preview copy. Not a complimentary copy. One time use for scientific identification.
DISTRIBUTION: We described this isopod from Puerto Rico and a few adjacent areas. Since then, we have seen it elsewhere. However, we cannot search everywhere. Reports and photographs from others are very useful in determining the exact geographic range of this isopod and its significance.
PARALELL EVOLUTION?: Similar Anilocra spp. occur on the tops of the heads of Soldierfishes, Myripristis spp., in the IndoPacific. These occurrences are very interesting and should be compared.
IMPORTANCE: New Country Record (Cayman Islands) and New Island Record (Little Cayman).
OBSERVERS: Dr. Ernest H. Williams, Jr.,[2,3,5,6] and Dr. Lucy Bunkley-Williams[2,4,5,7]
AFILIATIONS, ADDRESSES: [2]Extraordinary Professors, Potchefstroom Campus, North-West University, South Africa; Adjunct Professors, Research Field Station, Florida Gulf Coast University, 5164 Bonita Beach Road, Bonita Springs, FL 34134; [3]Dept. Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico (retired); [4]Dept. Biology, UPR (retired); [5]920 St. Andrews Blvd, Naples, FL 34113-8943; [6]e-mail ermest.williams1@upr.edu; cell 239-227-3645, ORCID 0000-0003-0913-3013; [7]Cell 787-467-2179, e-mail lucy.williams1@upr.edu, ORCID 0000-0003-1390-911x.
REFERENCES:
<>Bunkley-Williams, L. B. and E. H. Williams, Jr. 1981. Nine new species of Anilocra (Crustacea: Isopoda: Cymothoidae) external parasites of West Indian coral reef fishes. Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 94: 1005 1047. Google Scholar [41]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2019. Life cycle and life history strategies of parasitic crustacea. Chapter 5 and Pages 179-266 In: N. J. Smit, N. L. Bruce, and K. A. Hadfield (Eds.). Parasitic Crustacea: State of knowledge and future trends. Zoological Monographs 3, Springer Nature Switzerland, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-17385-2 [417]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020a. New Country Record for the Blackbar Soldierfish Isopod, Anilocra myripristis Bunkley-Williams and Williams, 1981, on the Blackbar Soldierfish, Mypristis jacobus Cuvier, 1829, in the Cayman Islands. iNaturalist #46323685, Research Quality Observations, 17 May (online) [499][1]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020b. New Island Record (Bimini) for the Blackbar Soldierfish Isopod, Anilocra myripristis Bunkley-Williams and Williams, 1981, on the Blackbar Soldierfish, Mypristis jacobus Cuvier, 1829. iNaturalist #46253997, Research Quality Observations, 17 May (online) [498]
FOOTNOTES:
[1]Identification was peer-reviewed, text edited and usually condensed. The entire, original text is in our reprint #499.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Observ.

ernesthwilliams

Fecha

Mayo 17, 2020 12:36 PM ADT

Descripción

NUMBER: 20200517[1]
SPECIES: Blackbar Soldierfish Isopod, Anilocra myripristis Bunkley-Williams and Williams, 1981[2]
SPECIMEN NUMBER, SEX, DEVELOPMENT: 1, female, adult
DISTINCTIONS: Only occurs on the Blackbar Soldierfish, Mypristis jacobus Cuvier, 1829, in The West Indies and south Florida (USA) (Bunkley-Williams and Williams, 1981).
DATE, TIME: 17 May 2020[1]
LOCALITY: Spotted Sand Reef near Bimini in the northern Bahamas
LATITUDE, LONGITUDE: around 25°43’48.0” N, 79°18’0.0” W (25.73, -79.30)
DIVE, PHOTO DEPTHS: unknown
LOCATION: Females only on top of head; sometimes micromales (juveniles) under or beside females (Bunkley-Williams and Williams, 1981; Williams and Bunkley-Williams, 2019)
HOST: Blackbar Soldierfish
PHOTOGRAPH: Herb Segars, FIS-29-3689, Herb Segars Photography, goto Snapshot.com. Marked advertisement/preview copy. Not a complementary copy. One time use for scientific identification.
DISTRIBUTION: We described this isopod from Puerto Rico and a few adjacent areas. Since then, we have seen it elsewhere. However, we cannot search everywhere. Reports and photographs from others are very useful in determining the exact geographic range of this isopod and its significance.
PARALELL EVOLUTION?: Similar Anilocra spp. occur on the tops of the heads of Soldierfishes, Myripristis spp., in the IndoPacific. These occurrences are very interesting and should be compared.
IMPORTANCE: New Island Record
OBSERVERS: Dr. Ernest H. Williams, Jr.,[3,4,6,7] and Dr. Lucy Bunkley-Williams[3,5,6,8]
AFILIATIONS, ADDRESSES: [3]Extraordinary Professors, Potchefstroom Campus, North-West University, South Africa; Adjunct Professors, Research Field Station, Florida Gulf Coast University, 5164 Bonita Beach Road, Bonita Springs, FL 34134; [4]Dept. Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico (retired); [5]Dept. Biology, UPR (retired); [6]920 St. Andrews Blvd, Naples, FL 34113-8943; [7]e-mail ermest.williams1@upr.edu; cell 239-227-3645, ORCID 0000-0003-0913-3013; [8]Cell 787-467-2179, e-mail lucy.williams1@upr.edu, ORCID 0000-0003-1390-911x.
REFERENCES:
<>Bunkley-Williams, L. B. and E. H. Williams, Jr. 1981. Nine new species of Anilocra (Crustacea: Isopoda: Cymothoidae) external parasites of West Indian coral reef fishes. Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 94: 1005 1047. Google Scholar [41]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2019. Life cycle and life history strategies of parasitic crustacea. Chapter 5 and Pages 179-266 In: N. J. Smit, N. L. Bruce, and K. A. Hadfield (Eds.). Parasitic Crustacea: State of knowledge and future trends. Zoological Monographs 3, Springer Nature Switzerland, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-17385-2 [417]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020. New Island Record (Bimini) for the Blackbar Soldierfish Isopod, Anilocra myripristis Bunkley-Williams and Williams, 1981, on the Blackbar Soldierfish, Mypristis jacobus Cuvier, 1829. iNaturalist #46253997, Research Quality Observations, 17 May (online) [498][2]
FOOTNOTES:
[1]Date photograph taken unknown. Date posted to iNaturalist 17 May 2020.
[2]Identification was peer-reviewed, text edited and usually condensed. The entire, original text is in our reprint #498.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Observ.

ernesthwilliams

Fecha

Diciembre 20, 2014

Descripción

NUMBER: 20141220
SPECIES: Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881[1]
SPECIMENS, NUMBER, SEX: 1, female under (Fig. A).
DISTINCTIONS: Tail shield (pleotelson) long, flat, ovate, and much longer than wide, edges widest apart near the middle; balancing fins (uropods) extend just slightly beyond posterior end of pleotelson; overall body more elongate and larger than many Anilocra spp.
LOCATION: This under arrangement suggests this is either the preferred attachment position, or more likely, that there is no preference difference between under and over (Williams and Bunkley-Williams, 2020a-l).
DATE: 20 December 2014
LOCALITY: House Reef, Kri Eco Resort, Jl. Gunung Tidar No. 1 Kampung Baru, Yenbuba, Sorong, Kabupaten Raja Ampat, Papua Bar., Indonesia
LATITUDE, LONGITUDE: 0°33’23.4” S, 130°40’41.5” E (-0.5565, 130.6782)
HOST: Topsail Chub, Kyphosus cinerascens (Forsskål, 1775)
CLEANER FISH: Bluestreak Cleanerfish, Labroides diminatus (Valenciennes, 1839), by the tail of the host fish. Cleanerfish cannot remove adult fish isopods.
PHOTOGRAPH: by Rokus Groeneveld, Marked preview/advertisement copy. Not a complimentary copy. One time use for scientific identification only.
COMMENTS: Raja Ampat is reputed to be the best diving site in the world.
IMPORTANCE: New Island Record and cleaner fish comments
OBSERVERS: Dr. Ernest H. Williams, Jr.,[2,3,5,6] and Dr. Lucy Bunkley-Williams[2,4,5,7]
AFILIATIONS, ADDRESSES: [2]Extraordinary Professors, Potchefstroom Campus, North-West University, South Africa; Adjunct Professors, Research Field Station, Florida Gulf Coast University, 5164 Bonita Beach Road, Bonita Springs, FL 34134; [3]Dept. Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico (retired); [4]Dept. Biology, UPR (retired); [5]920 St. Andrews Blvd, Naples, FL 34113-8943; [6]e-mail ermest.williams1@upr.edu; cell 239-227-3645, ORCID 0000-0003-0913-3013; [7]Cell 787-467-2179, e-mail lucy.williams1@upr.edu, ORCID 0000-0003-1390-911x.
REFERENCES:
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020a. New Island Record and cleanerfish comments for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Topsail Chub, Kyphosus cinerascens (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #46180630, Research Quality Observations, 16 May (online) [497][1]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020b. New Host Record and life cycle comments for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Topsail Chub, Kyphosus cinerascens (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #46045471, Research Quality Observations, 15 May (online) [496]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020c. New Location Record and life cycle comments for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Orbicular Batfish, Platax orbicularis (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #45935010, Research Quality Observations, 14 May (online) [495]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020d. New Location Record for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Gray Batfish, Platax pinnatus (Linnaeus, 1758). iNaturalist #45921275, Research Quality Observations, 14 May (online) [494]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020e. New Location Record and life cycle comments for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Orbicular Batfish, Platax orbicularis (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #45905797, Research Quality Observations, 14 May (online) [493]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020f. New Location Record for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on Gold Batfish, Platax boersii Bleeker, 1853. iNaturalist #45870230, Research Quality Observations, 14 May (online) [492]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020g. New Host and Location Records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on Gold Batfish, Platax boersii Bleeker, 1853. iNaturalist #45700521, Research Quality Observations, 12 May (online) [491]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020h. New hosts and locality records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, in Krakatoa and Okinawa. iNaturalist #44830243, Research Quality Observations, 3 May (online) [484]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020i. Three new attachment locations of the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Oblique-striped Sweetlips, Plectorhynchus lineatus (Linnaeus, 1758), Great Barrier Reef, Australia. iNaturalist #44931831, Research Quality Observations, 4 May (online) [486]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020j. New Country and Host Records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Dusky Batfish, Platax pinnatus (Linnaeus, 1758) in Indonesia. iNaturalist #45595377, Research Quality Observations, 11 May (online) [488]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020k. New Host Record for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on Longfin Batfish, Platax teira (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #45596142, Research Quality Observations, 11 May (online) [489]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020l. New Host and Location Records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Orbicular Batfish, Platax orbicularis (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #45641886, Research Quality Observations, 11 May (online) [490]
FOOTNOTES:
[1]Identification was peer-reviewed, text edited and usually condensed. The entire, original text is in our reprint #496.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Observ.

ernesthwilliams

Fecha

Marzo 24, 2020 11:25 PM ADT

Descripción

NUMBER: 20200324
SPECIES: Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881[1]
SPECIMENS, NUMBER, SEX: 2 females over-under (Fig. A)
DISTINCTIONS: Tail shield (pleotelson) long, flat, ovate, and much longer than wide, edges widest apart near the middle; balancing fins (uropods) extend just slightly beyond posterior end of pleotelson; overall body more elongate and larger than many Anilocra spp.
DATE: 24 March 2020
LOCALITY: Keruo Channel dive site, Keruo Island, near Penemu Island, Raja Ampat (4 kings), West Papua, Indonesia
LATITUDE, LONGITUDE: 0°33’12.0” S, 123°53’24.0” E (-0.56, 130.29)
HOST: Topsail Chub, Kyphosus cinerascens (Forsskål, 1775)
PHOTOGRAPH: by Colin Marshall, PX8HA8, Alamy Stock Photo, Marked preview/advertisement copies. Not a complimentary copy. One time use for scientific identification only.
DATA: iNaturalist #46046046
IMPORTANCE: none
OBSERVERS: Dr. Ernest H. Williams, Jr.,[3,4,6,7] and Dr. Lucy Bunkley-Williams[3,5,6,8]
AFILIATIONS, ADDRESSES: [3]Extraordinary Professors, Potchefstroom Campus, North-West University, South Africa; Adjunct Professors, Research Field Station, Florida Gulf Coast University, 5164 Bonita Beach Road, Bonita Springs, FL 34134; [4]Dept. Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico (retired); [5]Dept. Biology, UPR (retired); [6]920 St. Andrews Blvd, Naples, FL 34113-8943; [7]e-mail ermest.williams1@upr.edu; cell 239-227-3645, ORCID 0000-0003-0913-3013; [8]Cell 787-467-2179, e-mail lucy.williams1@upr.edu, ORCID 0000-0003-1390-911x.
REFERENCES:
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020a. New Host Record and life cycle comments for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Topsail Chub, Kyphosus cinerascens (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #46045471, Research Quality Observations, 15 May (online) [496]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020b. New Location Record and life cycle comments for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Orbicular Batfish, Platax orbicularis (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #45935010, Research Quality Observations, 14 May (online) [495]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020c. New Location Record for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Gray Batfish, Platax pinnatus (Linnaeus, 1758). iNaturalist #45921275, Research Quality Observations, 14 May (online) [494]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020d. New Location Record and life cycle comments for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Orbicular Batfish, Platax orbicularis (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #45905797, Research Quality Observations, 14 May (online) [493]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020e. New Location Record for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on Gold Batfish, Platax boersii Bleeker, 1853. iNaturalist #45870230, Research Quality Observations, 14 May (online) [492]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020f. New Host and Location Records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on Gold Batfish, Platax boersii Bleeker, 1853. iNaturalist #45700521, Research Quality Observations, 12 May (online) [491]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020g. New hosts and locality records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, in Krakatoa and Okinawa. iNaturalist #44830243, Research Quality Observations, 3 May (online) [484]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020h. Three new attachment locations of the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Oblique-striped Sweetlips, Plectorhynchus lineatus (Linnaeus, 1758), Great Barrier Reef, Australia. iNaturalist #44931831, Research Quality Observations, 4 May (online) [486]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020i. New Country and Host Records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Dusky Batfish, Platax pinnatus (Linnaeus, 1758) in Indonesia. iNaturalist #45595377, Research Quality Observations, 11 May (online) [488]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020j. New Host Record for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on Longfin Batfish, Platax teira (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #45596142, Research Quality Observations, 11 May (online) [489]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020k. New Host and Location Records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Orbicular Batfish, Platax orbicularis (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #45641886, Research Quality Observations, 11 May (online) [490]
FOOTNOTES:
[1]Identification was peer-reviewed, text edited and usually condensed. The text has not been numbered and is not in our reprint collection. Our reprint #496 was from the same host and locality.

Fotos / Sonidos

Copyright infringement square

Observ.

ernesthwilliams

Fecha

Marzo 20, 2020 11:15 PM ADT

Descripción

NUMBER: 20200320
SPECIES: Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881[1]
SPECIMENS, NUMBER, SEX: 7, 2 females over-under; 5 juveniles (Fig. A).
DISTINCTIONS: Tail shield (pleotelson) long, flat, ovate, and much longer than wide, edges widest apart near the middle; balancing fins (uropods) extend just slightly beyond posterior end of pleotelson; overall body more elongate and larger than many Anilocra spp.
LOCATION: This over-under arrangement differs by having 5 juvenile isopods in front of the lower female (Fig. A).
DATE: 20 March 2020
LOCALITY: Keruo Channel dive site, Keruo Island, near Penemu Island, Raja Ampat (4 kings), West Papua, Indonesia
LATITUDE, LONGITUDE: 0°33’12.0” S, 123°53’24.0” E (-0.56, 130.29)
HOST: Topsail Chub, Kyphosus cinerascens (Forsskål, 1775)
LIFE CYCLE: The juveniles could be micromales attracted to a receptive female. They are in 2 stages of development, which means they are from 2 different sources.
PHOTOGRAPH: by Colin Marshall, zw1-2691201, AGE PHOTOSTOCK, Marked preview/advertisement copies. Not a complimentary copy. One time use for scientific identification only.
IMPORTANCE: New Host Record and life cycle comments
OBSERVERS: Dr. Ernest H. Williams, Jr.,[2,3,5,6] and Dr. Lucy Bunkley-Williams[2,4,5,7]
AFILIATIONS, ADDRESSES: [2]Extraordinary Professors, Potchefstroom Campus, North-West University, South Africa; Adjunct Professors, Research Field Station, Florida Gulf Coast University, 5164 Bonita Beach Road, Bonita Springs, FL 34134; [3]Dept. Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico (retired); [4]Dept. Biology, UPR (retired); [5]920 St. Andrews Blvd, Naples, FL 34113-8943; [6]e-mail ermest.williams1@upr.edu; cell 239-227-3645, ORCID 0000-0003-0913-3013; [7]Cell 787-467-2179, e-mail lucy.williams1@upr.edu, ORCID 0000-0003-1390-911x.
REFERENCES:
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020a. New Host Record and life cycle comments for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Topsail Chub, Kyphosus cinerascens (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #46045471, Research Quality Observations, 15 May (online) [496][1]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020b. New Location Record and life cycle comments for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Orbicular Batfish, Platax orbicularis (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #45935010, Research Quality Observations, 14 May (online) [495]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020b. New Location Record for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Gray Batfish, Platax pinnatus (Linnaeus, 1758). iNaturalist #45921275, Research Quality Observations, 14 May (online) [494]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020c. New Location Record and life cycle comments for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Orbicular Batfish, Platax orbicularis (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #45905797, Research Quality Observations, 14 May (online) [493]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020d. New Location Record for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on Gold Batfish, Platax boersii Bleeker, 1853. iNaturalist #45870230, Research Quality Observations, 14 May (online) [492]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020e. New Host and Location Records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on Gold Batfish, Platax boersii Bleeker, 1853. iNaturalist #45700521, Research Quality Observations, 12 May (online) [491]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020f. New hosts and locality records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, in Krakatoa and Okinawa. iNaturalist #44830243, Research Quality Observations, 3 May (online) [484]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020g. Three new attachment locations of the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Oblique-striped Sweetlips, Plectorhynchus lineatus (Linnaeus, 1758), Great Barrier Reef, Australia. iNaturalist #44931831, Research Quality Observations, 4 May (online) [486]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020h. New Country and Host Records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Dusky Batfish, Platax pinnatus (Linnaeus, 1758) in Indonesia. iNaturalist #45595377, Research Quality Observations, 11 May (online) [488]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020i. New Host Record for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on Longfin Batfish, Platax teira (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #45596142, Research Quality Observations, 11 May (online) [489]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020j. New Host and Location Records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Orbicular Batfish, Platax orbicularis (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #45641886, Research Quality Observations, 11 May (online) [490]
FOOTNOTES:
[1]Identification was peer-reviewed, text edited and usually condensed. The entire, original text is in our reprint #496.

Fotos / Sonidos

Copyright infringement square

Observ.

ernesthwilliams

Fecha

Mayo 14, 2020 09:39 PM ADT

Descripción

NUMBER: 20141104
SPECIES: Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881[2]
SPECIMENS, NUMBER, SEX: 3, 2 females over-under; 1 developing female on side of head.
DISTINCTIONS: Tail shield (pleotelson) long, flat, ovate, and much longer than wide, edges widest apart near the middle; balancing fins (uropods) extend just slightly beyond posterior end of pleotelson; overall body more elongate and larger than many Anilocra spp.
LOCATION: This attachment is different by having a developing female isopod above the over-under arrangement.
DATE: 4 November 2014[1]
LOCALITY: Wakatobi Archipelago, Tukangbesi Islands, Southeast Sulawesi, Indonesia
LATITUDE, LONGITUDE: 5°46’12.0” S, 123°53’24.0” E (-5.77, 123.89)???
INDENTIFICATIONS: isopod and host
HOST: Obicular Batfish, Platax obicularis (Forsskål, 1775).
PHOTOGRAPH: by Véronique Ressouches, doris.ffessm.fr, plataxLet_anilocra-vr1_image1200, Marked preview/advertisement copy. Not a complimentary copy. One time use for scientific identification only.
LIFE CYCLE: Below the developing female is above a scar made by an adult female. This suggests that this immature form is replacing a lost adult specimen. The same may be said about the upper female. These also suggest that lost isopods are rather quickly replaced.
IMPORTANCE: New Location Record and life cycle comments
OBSERVERS: Dr. Ernest H. Williams, Jr.,[3,4,6,7] and Dr. Lucy Bunkley-Williams[3,5,6,8]
AFILIATIONS, ADDRESSES: [3]Extraordinary Professors, Potchefstroom Campus, North-West University, South Africa; Adjunct Professors, Research Field Station, Florida Gulf Coast University, 5164 Bonita Beach Road, Bonita Springs, FL 34134; [4]Dept. Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico (retired); [5]Dept. Biology, UPR (retired); [6]920 St. Andrews Blvd, Naples, FL 34113-8943; [7]e-mail ermest.williams1@upr.edu; cell 239-227-3645, ORCID 0000-0003-0913-3013; [8]Cell 787-467-2179, e-mail lucy.williams1@upr.edu, ORCID 0000-0003-1390-911x.
REFERENCES:
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020a. New Location Record and life cycle comments for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Orbicular Batfish, Platax orbicularis (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #45935010, Research Quality Observations, 14 May (online) [495]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020b. New Location Record for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Gray Batfish, Platax pinnatus (Linnaeus, 1758). iNaturalist #45921275, Research Quality Observations, 14 May (online) [494]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020b. New Location Record and life cycle comments for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Orbicular Batfish, Platax orbicularis (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #45905797, Research Quality Observations, 14 May (online) [493]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020c. New Location Record for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on Gold Batfish, Platax boersii Bleeker, 1853. iNaturalist #45870230, Research Quality Observations, 14 May (online) [492]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020d. New Host and Location Records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on Gold Batfish, Platax boersii Bleeker, 1853. iNaturalist #45700521, Research Quality Observations, 12 May (online) [491]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020e. New hosts and locality records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, in Krakatoa and Okinawa. iNaturalist #44830243, Research Quality Observations, 3 May (online) [484]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020f. Three new attachment locations of the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Oblique-striped Sweetlips, Plectorhynchus lineatus (Linnaeus, 1758), Great Barrier Reef, Australia. iNaturalist #44931831, Research Quality Observations, 4 May (online) [486]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020g. New Country and Host Records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Dusky Batfish, Platax pinnatus (Linnaeus, 1758) in Indonesia. iNaturalist #45595377, Research Quality Observations, 11 May (online) [488]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020h. New Host Record for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on Longfin Batfish, Platax teira (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #45596142, Research Quality Observations, 11 May (online) [489]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020i. New Host and Location Records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Orbicular Batfish, Platax orbicularis (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #45641886, Research Quality Observations, 11 May (online) [490]
FOOTNOTES:
[1]Date photograph taken is unknown, posted on iNature 14 May 2020
[2]Identification was peer-reviewed, text edited and usually condensed. The entire, original text is in our reprint #495.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Observ.

ernesthwilliams

Fecha

Mayo 14, 2020 06:59 PM ADT

Descripción

NUMBER: 20200514
SPECIES: Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881[2]
SPECIMENS, NUMBER, SEX: 3, 2 females over-under; 1 female on upper opposite side
DISTINCTIONS: Tail shield (pleotelson) long, flat, ovate, and much longer than wide, edges widest apart near the middle; balancing fins (uropods) extend just slightly beyond posterior end of pleotelson; overall body more elongate and larger than many Anilocra spp.
LOCATION: This attachment is different by having a single female isopod under the eye.
DATE: 14 May 2020[1]
LOCALITY: Wakatobi Archipelago, Tukangbesi Islands, Southeast Sulawesi, Indonesia
LATITUDE, LONGITUDE: 5°46’12.0” S, 123°53’24.0” E (-5.77, 123.89)???
HOST: Gray Batfish, Platax pinnatus (Linnaeus, 1758)
PHOTOGRAPH: by Dan Exton, #8932261, Marked preview/advertisement copy. Not a complimentary copy. One time use for scientific identification only.
IMPORTANCE: New Location Record
OBSERVERS: Dr. Ernest H. Williams, Jr.,[3,4,6,7] and Dr. Lucy Bunkley-Williams[3,5,6,8]
AFILIATIONS, ADDRESSES: [3]Extraordinary Professors, Potchefstroom Campus, North-West University, South Africa; Adjunct Professors, Research Field Station, Florida Gulf Coast University, 5164 Bonita Beach Road, Bonita Springs, FL 34134; [4]Dept. Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico (retired); [5]Dept. Biology, UPR (retired); [6]920 St. Andrews Blvd, Naples, FL 34113-8943; [7]e-mail ermest.williams1@upr.edu; cell 239-227-3645, ORCID 0000-0003-0913-3013; [8]Cell 787-467-2179, e-mail lucy.williams1@upr.edu, ORCID 0000-0003-1390-911x.
REFERENCES:
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020a. New Location Record for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Gray Batfish, Platax pinnatus (Linnaeus, 1758). iNaturalist #45921275, Research Quality Observations, 14 May (online) [494]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020b. New Location Record and life cycle comments for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Orbicular Batfish, Platax orbicularis (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #???, Research Quality Observations, 14 May (online) [493]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020c. New Location Record for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on Gold Batfish, Platax boersii Bleeker, 1853. iNaturalist #???, Research Quality Observations, 14 May (online) [492]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020d. New Host and Location Records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on Gold Batfish, Platax boersii Bleeker, 1853. iNaturalist #45700521, Research Quality Observations, 12 May (online) [491]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020e. New hosts and locality records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, in Krakatoa and Okinawa. iNaturalist #44830243, Research Quality Observations, 3 May (online) [484]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020f. Three new attachment locations of the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Oblique-striped Sweetlips, Plectorhynchus lineatus (Linnaeus, 1758), Great Barrier Reef, Australia. iNaturalist #44931831, Research Quality Observations, 4 May (online) [486]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020g. New Country and Host Records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Dusky Batfish, Platax pinnatus (Linnaeus, 1758) in Indonesia. iNaturalist #45595377, Research Quality Observations, 11 May (online) [488]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020h. New Host Record for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on Longfin Batfish, Platax teira (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #45596142, Research Quality Observations, 11 May (online) [489]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020i. New Host and Location Records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Orbicular Batfish, Platax orbicularis (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #45641886, Research Quality Observations, 11 May (online) [490]
FOOTNOTES:
[1]Date photograph taken is unknown, posted on iNature 14 May 2020
[2]Identification was peer-reviewed, text edited and usually condensed. The entire, original text is in our reprint #494.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Observ.

ernesthwilliams

Fecha

Mayo 14, 2020 04:21 PM ADT

Descripción

NUMBER: 20200514[1]
SPECIES: Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881[2]
SPECIMENS, NUMBER, SEX: 3, 2 females over-under; 1 female on upper opposite side
DISTINCTIONS: Tail shield (pleotelson) long, flat, ovate, and much longer than wide, edges widest apart near the middle; balancing fins (uropods) extend just slightly beyond posterior end of pleotelson; overall body more elongate and larger than many Anilocra spp.
LOCATION: This attachment is different by having the 3rd female isopod.
DATE: 14 May 2020[1]
LOCALITY: Wakatobi Archipelago, Tukangbesi Islands, Southeast Sulawesi, Indonesia
LATITUDE, LONGITUDE: 5°46’12.0” S, 123°53’24.0” E (-5.77, 123.89)
HOST: Obicular Batfish, Platax obcularis (Forsskål, 1775)
HOST DISTICTIONS: Body gold, silver, or brown; broadly diffuse, or no, face stripes; 1st stripe often covering front of face; pectoral fins placed in space between face stripes, other batfishes have pelvic fins at base of second stripe
LIFE CYCLE: We believe the algae growing on the upper right female indicates she is old and has ceased molting. This would suggest that she is (1) older than the others and infected the host before the other females and not simultaneously, (2) this, the female on the upper opposite, and the single upper female in Williams and Bunkley-Williams (2020c)(iNaturalist #45700521) suggest that the upper position is preferred. However, a single lower female occurred in Williams and Bunkley-Williams (2020b).
IDENTIFICATION: of fish host and isopod
PHOTOGRAPH: by D. Stephens, Indonesia83, Travel-Images.com, Marked preview/advertisement copy. Not a complimentary copy. One time use for scientific identification only.
IMPORTANCE: New Location Record and Life Cycle information
OBSERVERS: Dr. Ernest H. Williams, Jr.,[3,4,6,7] and Dr. Lucy Bunkley-Williams[3,5,6,8]
AFILIATIONS, ADDRESSES: [3]Extraordinary Professors, Potchefstroom Campus, North-West University, South Africa; Adjunct Professors, Research Field Station, Florida Gulf Coast University, 5164 Bonita Beach Road, Bonita Springs, FL 34134; [4]Dept. Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico (retired); [5]Dept. Biology, UPR (retired); [6]920 St. Andrews Blvd, Naples, FL 34113-8943; [7]e-mail ermest.williams1@upr.edu; cell 239-227-3645, ORCID 0000-0003-0913-3013; [8]Cell 787-467-2179, e-mail lucy.williams1@upr.edu, ORCID 0000-0003-1390-911x.
REFERENCES:
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020a. New Location Record and life cycle comments for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Orbicular Batfish, Platax orbicularis (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #45905797, Research Quality Observations, 14 May (online) [493]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020b. New Location Record for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Gray Batfish, Platax pinnatus (Linnaeus, 1758). iNaturalist #???, Research Quality Observations, 14 May (online) [494]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020c. New Location Record for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on Gold Batfish, Platax boersii Bleeker, 1853. iNaturalist #45870230, Research Quality Observations, 13 May (online) [492]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020d. New Host and Location Records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on Gold Batfish, Platax boersii Bleeker, 1853. iNaturalist #45700521, Research Quality Observations, 12 May (online) [491]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020e. New hosts and locality records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, in Krakatoa and Okinawa. iNaturalist #44830243, Research Quality Observations, 3 May (online) [484]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020f. Three new attachment locations of the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Oblique-striped Sweetlips, Plectorhynchus lineatus (Linnaeus, 1758), Great Barrier Reef, Australia. iNaturalist #44931831, Research Quality Observations, 4 May (online) [486]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020g. New Country and Host Records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Dusky Batfish, Platax pinnatus (Linnaeus, 1758) in Indonesia. iNaturalist #45595377, Research Quality Observations, 11 May (online) [488]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020h. New Host Record for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on Longfin Batfish, Platax teira (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #45596142, Research Quality Observations, 11 May (online) [489]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020i. New Host and Location Records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Orbicular Batfish, Platax orbicularis (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #45641886, Research Quality Observations, 11 May (online) [490]
FOOTNOTES:
[1]Date photograph taken is unknown, posted on iNature 13 May 2020
[2]Identification was peer-reviewed, text edited and usually condensed. The entire, original text is in our reprint #493.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Observ.

ernesthwilliams

Fecha

Missing Date

Descripción

NUMBER: 20081023[1]
SPECIES: Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881[2]
SPECIMENS, NUMBER, SEX: 3, 2 females over-under; 1 developing male/female
DISTINCTIONS: Tail shield (pleotelson) long, flat, ovate, and much longer than wide, edges widest apart near the middle; balancing fins (uropods) extend just slightly beyond posterior end of pleotelson; overall body more elongate and larger than many Anilocra spp.
LOCATION: This attachment pattern is different by having the developing isopod.
DATE: 23 October 2008[1]
LOCALITY: Wakatobi, Onemobaa Island, Indonesia
LATITUDE, LONGITUDE: 5°46’12.0” S, 123°53’24.0” E (-5.77, 123.89)
HOST: Gold Batfish, Platax boersii Bleeker, 1853
HOST DISTICTIONS: Body gold, silver, or brown; broadly diffuse, or no, face stripes; 1st stripe often covering front of face; pectoral fins placed in space between face stripes, other batfishes have pelvic fins at base of second stripe
IDENTIFICATION: of fish host and isopod
PHOTOGRAPH: by Ross Gudgeon, #35430, Marked advertisement copy. Not a complimentary copy. One time use for scientific identification only.
IMPORTANCE: New Location Record
OBSERVERS: Dr. Ernest H. Williams, Jr.,[3,4,6,7] and Dr. Lucy Bunkley-Williams[3,5,6,8]
AFILIATIONS, ADDRESSES: [3]Extraordinary Professors, Potchefstroom Campus, North-West University, South Africa; Adjunct Professors, Research Field Station, Florida Gulf Coast University, 5164 Bonita Beach Road, Bonita Springs, FL 34134; [4]Dept. Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico (retired); [5]Dept. Biology, UPR (retired); [6]920 St. Andrews Blvd, Naples, FL 34113-8943; [7]e-mail ermest.williams1@upr.edu; cell 239-227-3645, ORCID 0000-0003-0913-3013; [8]Cell 787-467-2179, e-mail lucy.williams1@upr.edu, ORCID 0000-0003-1390-911x.
REFERENCES:
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020a. New Location Record for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on Gold Batfish, Platax boersii Bleeker, 1853. iNaturalist #45870230, Research Quality Observations, 13 May (online) [492]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020b. New Host and Location Records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on Gold Batfish, Platax boersii Bleeker, 1853. iNaturalist #45700521, Research Quality Observations, 12 May (online) [491]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020c. New hosts and locality records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, in Krakatoa and Okinawa. iNaturalist #44830243, Research Quality Observations, 3 May (online) [484]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020d. Three new attachment locations of the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Oblique-striped Sweetlips, Plectorhynchus lineatus (Linnaeus, 1758), Great Barrier Reef, Australia. iNaturalist #44931831, Research Quality Observations, 4 May (online) [486]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020e. New Country and Host Records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Dusky Batfish, Platax pinnatus (Linnaeus, 1758) in Indonesia. iNaturalist #45595377, Research Quality Observations, 11 May (online) [488]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020f. New Host Record for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on Longfin Batfish, Platax teira (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #45596142, Research Quality Observations, 11 May (online) [489]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020g. New Host and Location Records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Orbicular Batfish, Platax orbicularis (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #45641886, Research Quality Observations, 11 May (online) [490]
FOOTNOTES:
[1]Date photograph taken is unknown, posted online 23 October 2008
[2]Identification was peer-reviewed, text edited and usually condensed. The entire, original text is in our reprint #492.

Fotos / Sonidos

Copyright infringement square

Observ.

ernesthwilliams

Fecha

Mayo 12, 2020 12:06 PM ADT

Descripción

NUMBER: 20200512[1]
SPECIES: Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881[2]
SPECIMENS, NUMBER, SEX: 1, female
DISTINCTIONS: Tail shield (pleotelson) long, flat, ovate, and much longer than wide, edges widest apart near the middle; balancing fins (uropods) extend just slightly beyond posterior end of pleotelson; overall body more elongate and larger than many Anilocra spp.
LOCATION: This attachment is different by lacking the “under” part of the usual over-under configuration.
DATE: 12 May 2020[1]
LOCALITY: Wakatobi, Onemobaa Island, Indonesia
LATITUDE, LONGITUDE: 5°46’12.0” S, 123°53’24.0” E (-5.77, 123.89)
HOST: Gold Batfish,[3] Platax boersii Bleeker, 1853
HOST DISTICTIONS: Body gold, silver, or brown; broadly diffuse, or no, face stripes; 1st stripe often covering front of face; pectoral fins placed in space between face stripes, other batfishes have pelvic fins at base of second stripe
IDENTIFICATION: of fish host and isopod
PHOTOGRAPH: by Alan James, #scs-26201003AJ, AGE Fotostock, www.agephotostock.com, Marked advertisement copy. Not a complimentary copy. One time use for scientific identification only.
IMPORTANCE: New Host and Location Records
OBSERVERS: Dr. Ernest H. Williams, Jr.,[4,5,7,8] and Dr. Lucy Bunkley-Williams[4,6,7,9]
AFILIATIONS, ADDRESSES: [4]Extraordinary Professors, Potchefstroom Campus, North-West University, South Africa; Adjunct Professors, Research Field Station, Florida Gulf Coast University, 5164 Bonita Beach Road, Bonita Springs, FL 34134; [5]Dept. Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico (retired); [6]Dept. Biology, UPR (retired); [7]920 St. Andrews Blvd, Naples, FL 34113-8943; [8]e-mail ermest.williams1@upr.edu; cell 239-227-3645, ORCID 0000-0003-0913-3013; [9]Cell 787-467-2179, e-mail lucy.williams1@upr.edu, ORCID 0000-0003-1390-911x.
REFERENCES:
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020a. New Host and Location Records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on Gold Batfish, Platax boersii Bleeker, 1853. iNaturalist #45700521, Research Quality Observations, 12 May (online) [491]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020b. New hosts and locality records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, in Krakatoa and Okinawa. iNaturalist #44830243, Research Quality Observations, 3 May (online) [484]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020c. Three new attachment locations of the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Oblique-striped Sweetlips, Plectorhynchus lineatus (Linnaeus, 1758), Great Barrier Reef, Australia. iNaturalist #44931831, Research Quality Observations, 4 May (online) [486]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020d. New Country and Host Records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Dusky Batfish, Platax pinnatus (Linnaeus, 1758) in Indonesia. iNaturalist #45595377, Research Quality Observations, 11 May (online) [488]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020e. New Host Record for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on Longfin Batfish, Platax teira (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #45596142, Research Quality Observations, 11 May (online) [489]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020f. New Host and Location Records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Orbicular Batfish, Platax orbicularis (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #45641886, Research Quality Observations, 11 May (online) [490]
FOOTNOTES:
[1]Date photograph taken is unknown, reported 12 May 2020
[2]Identification was peer-reviewed, text edited and usually condensed. The entire, original text is in our reprint #491.
[3]Suggested new common name

Fotos / Sonidos

Copyright infringement square

Observ.

ernesthwilliams

Fecha

Mayo 11, 2020 08:06 PM ADT

Descripción

SPECIES: Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881[1]
SPECIMENS, NUMBER, SEX: 2, female
DISTINCTIONS: Tail shield (pleotelson) long, flat, ovate, and much longer than wide, edges widest apart near the middle; balancing fins (uropods) extend just slightly beyond posterior end of pleotelson; overall body more elongate and larger than many Anilocra spp.
DIVE: night
LOCATION: Beside the normal above-and-below pair, a developing female on the side of the head (Fig. A)
PHOTOGRAPH: by Pacific Stock, DISSOLVE #1234_2_045-1200. Marked advertisement copy. Not a complimentary copy. One time use for scientific identification only.
LOCALITY: Wakatobi, Celebes, Indonesia
LATITUDE, LONGITUDE: 5°46’12.0” S, 123°53’24.0” E (-5.77, 123.89)
HOST: Orbicular Batfish, Platax orbicularis (Forsskål, 1775)
IMPORTANCE: New Host and New Location Records
OBSERVERS: Dr. Ernest H. Williams, Jr.,[2,3,5,6] and Dr. Lucy Bunkley-Williams[2,4,5,7]
AFILIATIONS, ADDRESSES: [2]Extraordinary Professors, Potchefstroom Campus, North-West University, South Africa; Adjunct Professors, Research Field Station, Florida Gulf Coast University, 5164 Bonita Beach Road, Bonita Springs, FL 34134; [3]Dept. Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico (retired); [4]Dept. Biology, UPR (retired); [5]920 St. Andrews Blvd, Naples, FL 34113-8943; [6]e-mail ermest.williams1@upr.edu; cell 239-227-3645, ORCID 0000-0003-0913-3013; [7]Cell 787-467-2179, e-mail lucy.williams1@upr.edu, ORCID 0000-0003-1390-911x.
REFERENCES:
<>Bruce, N. L. and E. B. Harrison-Nelson. 1988. New records of fish parasitic marine isopod crustaceans (Cymothoidae, subfamily Anilocrinae) from the Indo-West Pacific. Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 101: 585-602. https://decapoda.nhm.org/pdfs/2608/2608.pdf
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2019. Life cycle and life history strategies of parasitic crustacea. Chapter 5 and Pages 179-266 In: N. J. Smit, N. L. Bruce, and K. A. Hadfield (Eds.). Parasitic Crustacea: State of knowledge and future trends. Zoological Monographs 3, Springer Nature Switzerland, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-17385-2 [417]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020a. New Host and Location Records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Orbicular Batfish, Platax orbicularis (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #45641886, Research Quality Observations, 11 May (online) [490]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020b. New Host Record for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on Longfin Batfish, Platax teira (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #45596142, Research Quality Observations, 11 May (online) [489]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020c. New Country and Host Records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Dusky Batfish, Platax pinnatus (Linnaeus, 1758) in Indonesia. iNaturalist #45595377, Research Quality Observations, 11 May (online) [488]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020d. New hosts and locality records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, in Krakatoa and Okinawa. iNaturalist #44830243, Research Quality Observations, 3 May (online) [484]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020e. Three new attachment locations of the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Oblique-striped Sweetlips, Plectorhynchus lineatus (Linnaeus, 1758), Great Barrier Reef, Australia. iNaturalist #44931831, Research Quality Observations, 4 May (online) [486]
[1]Identification was peer-reviewed, text edited and usually condensed. The entire, original text is in our reprint #490.

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Observ.

ernesthwilliams

Fecha

Junio 10, 2009

Descripción

NUMBER: 20090610
SPECIES: Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881[1]
SPECIMENS, NUMBER, SEX: 2, female
DISTINCTIONS: Tail shield (pleotelson) long, flat, ovate, and much longer than wide, edges widest apart near the middle; balancing fins (uropods) extend just slightly beyond posterior end of pleotelson; overall body more elongate and larger than many Anilocra spp.
DATE: 10 June 2009
PHOTOGRAPH: by WaterFrame_fba, Alamy BCHEE1, www.alamy.com. Marked advertisement copy. Not a complimentary copy. One time use for scientific identification only.
LOCALITY: Wakatobi, Celebes, Indonesia
LATITUDE, LONGITUDE: 5°46’12.0” S, 123°53’24.0” E (-5.77, 123.89)
HOST: Longfin Batfish, Platax teira (Forsskål, 1775)
IMPORTANCE: New Host and New Country Records
OBSERVERS: Dr. Ernest H. Williams, Jr.,[3,4,6,7] and Dr. Lucy Bunkley-Williams[3,5,6,8]
AFILIATIONS, ADDRESSES: [3]Extraordinary Professors, Potchefstroom Campus, North-West University, South Africa; Adjunct Professors, Research Field Station, Florida Gulf Coast University, 5164 Bonita Beach Road, Bonita Springs, FL 34134; [4]Dept. Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico (retired); [5]Dept. Biology, UPR (retired); [6]920 St. Andrews Blvd, Naples, FL 34113-8943; [7]e-mail ermest.williams1@upr.edu; cell 239-227-3645, ORCID 0000-0003-0913-3013; [8]Cell 787-467-2179, e-mail lucy.williams1@upr.edu, ORCID 0000-0003-1390-911x.
REFERENCES:
<>Bruce, N. L. and E. B. Harrison-Nelson. 1988. New records of fish parasitic marine isopod crustaceans (Cymothoidae, subfamily Anilocrinae) from the Indo-West Pacific. Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 101: 585-602. https://decapoda.nhm.org/pdfs/2608/2608.pdf
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2019. Life cycle and life history strategies of parasitic crustacea. Chapter 5 and Pages 179-266 In: N. J. Smit, N. L. Bruce, and K. A. Hadfield (Eds.). Parasitic Crustacea: State of knowledge and future trends. Zoological Monographs 3, Springer Nature Switzerland, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-17385-2 [417]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020a. New Host Record for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on Longfin Batfish, Platax teira (Forsskål, 1775). iNaturalist #45596142, Research Quality Observations, 11 May (online) [489]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020b. New Country and Host Records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Dusky Batfish, Platax pinnatus (Linnaeus, 1758) in Indonesia. iNaturalist #45595377, Research Quality Observations, 11 May (online) [488]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020c. New hosts and locality records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, in Krakatoa and Okinawa. iNaturalist #44830243, Research Quality Observations, 3 May (online) [484]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020d. Three new attachment locations of the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Oblique-striped Sweetlips, Plectorhynchus lineatus (Linnaeus, 1758), Great Barrier Reef, Australia. iNaturalist #44931831, Research Quality Observations, 4 May (online) [486]
[1]Identification was peer-reviewed, text edited and usually condensed. The entire, original text is in our reprint #489.

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ernesthwilliams

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Missing Date

Descripción

NUMBER: 20051213
SPECIES: Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881[1]
SPECIMENS, NUMBER, SEX: 2, female
DISTINCTIONS: Tail shield (pleotelson) long, flat, ovate, and much longer than wide, edges widest apart near the middle; balancing fins (uropods) extend just slightly beyond posterior end of pleotelson; overall body more elongate and larger than many Anilocra spp.
DATE: 13 December 2005
LOCALITY: Wakatobi Dive Resort, Sulawesi, Indonesia (Indian Ocean, Banda Sea)
LATITUDE, LONGITUDE: 5°46’12.0” S, 123°53’24.0” E (-5.77, 123.89)
HOST: Dusky Batfish, Platax pinnatus (Linnaeus, 1758). We have heard of occurrences of apparently this isopod on this host previously but have never had a photograph adequate for an identification previously.
PHOTOGRAPH: by Reinhard Dirscherl, ullstein collection, Getty Images. Marked advertisement copy. Not a complimentary copy. Gettyimages #5154955, 549032659. One time use for scientific identification only.
ATTACHMENT LOCATION: The unusual Over-Under Attachment by this isopod seems to be the most common and most reported configuration. This is not a simple female-male pair, as both isopods are females. This may be an indication that our Micromale Life Cycle (Williams and Bunkley-Williams, 2019) is occurring.
SIMILAR SPECIES: Bruce and Harrison-Nelson (1988) found the Sweetlips Isopod was very similar to our Surgeonfish Isopod,[2] Anilocra prionuri Williams and Bunkley-Williams, 1986. It differs by having a bulbous rather than triangular-digitiform rostral fold, and a distinctly shorter pleotelson well exceeded by the uropod rami (can be judged in Fig. A).
IMPORTANCE: New Country and New Host Records
OBSERVERS: Dr. Ernest H. Williams, Jr.,[3,4,6,7] and Dr. Lucy Bunkley-Williams[3,5,6,8]
AFILIATIONS, ADDRESSES: [3]Extraordinary Professors, Potchefstroom Campus, North-West University, South Africa; Adjunct Professors, Research Field Station, Florida Gulf Coast University, 5164 Bonita Beach Road, Bonita Springs, FL 34134; [4]Dept. Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico (retired); [5]Dept. Biology, UPR (retired); [6]920 St. Andrews Blvd, Naples, FL 34113-8943; [7]e-mail ermest.williams1@upr.edu; cell 239-227-3645, ORCID 0000-0003-0913-3013; [8]Cell 787-467-2179, e-mail lucy.williams1@upr.edu, ORCID 0000-0003-1390-911x.
REFERENCES:
<>Bruce, N. L. and E. B. Harrison-Nelson. 1988. New records of fish parasitic marine isopod crustaceans (Cymothoidae, subfamily Anilocrinae) from the Indo-West Pacific. Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 101: 585-602. https://decapoda.nhm.org/pdfs/2608/2608.pdf
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2019. Life cycle and life history strategies of parasitic crustacea. Chapter 5 and Pages 179-266 In: N. J. Smit, N. L. Bruce, and K. A. Hadfield (Eds.). Parasitic Crustacea: State of knowledge and future trends. Zoological Monographs 3, Springer Nature Switzerland, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-17385-2 [417]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020a. New Country Record and Host Records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, in Krakatoa and Okinawa. iNaturalist #45595377, Research Quality Observations, 11 May (online) [488]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020b. New hosts and locality records for the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, in Krakatoa and Okinawa. iNaturalist #44830243, Research Quality Observations, 3 May (online) [484]
<>Williams, E. H., Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 2020c. Three new attachment locations of the Sweetlips Isopod, Anilocra longicauda Schioedte and Meinert, 1881, on the Oblique-striped Sweetlips, Plectorhynchus lineatus (Linnaeus, 1758), Great Barrier Reef, Australia. iNaturalist #44931831, Research Quality Observations, 4 May (online) [486]
[1]Identification was peer-reviewed, text edited and usually condensed. The entire, original text is in our reprint #488.
[2]Suggested New Common Name

Fuentes:: Átomo