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Photos / Sounds

What

Sacred Thorn-Apple Datura wrightii

Observer

nvhamlett

Date

September 29, 2019 04:41 PM PDT

Description

By the intersection of Gale Mtwy and Pomello. A number of these were growing in the disturbed area along the side of the Pomello with non-native grasses and mustard as well as Telegraph Weed and Dove Weed. Both the flower and leaves showed evidence of herbivory, but I didn't observe the culprit.

Photos / Sounds

What

San Diego Alligator Lizard Elgaria multicarinata ssp. webbii

Observer

nvhamlett

Date

September 29, 2019 04:37 PM PDT

Description

Southern Alligator Lizard moved into the grass and low vegetation at the side of Pomello Drive, in the Claremont Hills Wilderness Park.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Bewick's Wren Thryomanes bewickii

Observer

nvhamlett

Date

September 29, 2019 04:01 PM PDT

Description

Next to the Thompson Creek Trail. It had ventured out into the trail but flew into the nearby shrubbery when a walker approached.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

California Towhee Melozone crissalis

Observer

nvhamlett

Date

September 29, 2019 04:15 PM PDT

Description

Foraging beside Pomello Rd just before the entrance to the Wilderness Park.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

European Starling Sturnus vulgaris

Observer

nvhamlett

Date

September 29, 2019 04:16 PM PDT

Description

European Starling perched on a wire near the intersection of Pomello with the Thompson Creek Trail. It was shortly joined by two others.

Photos / Sounds

What

Fiery Skipper Hylephila phyleus

Observer

nvhamlett

Date

September 25, 2019 10:41 AM PDT

Description

This skipper was nectaring on Scale-Broom (Lepidospartum squamatum) in sage scrub at the Claremont Colleges' Bernard Field Station. It does not look like any of the local skippers I am familiar with even though it has rather distinctive markings.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

California Yellowjacket Vespula sulphurea

Observer

nvhamlett

Date

September 8, 2019 01:03 PM PDT

Description

A number of black and yellow wasps were patrolling back and forth over the sandy, gravelly road along Evey-Palmer Mtwy. I assume they were hunting. They were hard to photograph as they seldom lit, but I caught this one in flight.

The two vertical lines one the thorax together with the pattern on the abdomen and eyes clearly identify this wasp as Vespula sulphurea.

The only other wasp flying over the road that we we able to photograph was this sand wasp, so not all the wasps were the same species.

@harsiparker, after not seeing a single one of these for nearly 10 years, I've now seen two in less than a month. Looking at the distribution on iNat, I think they prefer the foothills and mountains over the lowland. What do you think?

Photos / Sounds

What

Coast Live Oak Quercus agrifolia

Observer

nvhamlett

Date

September 8, 2019 09:36 AM PDT

Description

A beautiful grove of coast live oaks.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

nvhamlett

Date

September 8, 2019 12:22 PM PDT

Description

This large, striking beetle was on California Buckwheat (Eriogonum fasciculatum) beside Palmer-Evey Mtwy. At first glance, we thought this was a tarantula hawk, and it turns out that members of this genus are noted for being mimics of Pepsis and Hemipepsis (Smith and Ray 2008). The resemblance is particularly striking in the second photo, which shows a side view.

This is the same individual as this observation.

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

nvhamlett

Date

September 8, 2019 01:10 PM PDT

Description

This bee fly was picking up sand in her sand chamber on the Palmer-Evey Mtwy. The sand sticks to the eggs (or the eggs stick to the sand?) making them easier to deposit. Andy Calderwod discusses this behavior in a comment in this BugGuide post.

Although I am pretty sure this is a Villa species, I doubt that it can be identified to species.

Photos / Sounds

What

Funereal Duskywing Erynnis funeralis

Observer

nvhamlett

Date

September 8, 2019 11:13 AM PDT

Description

Nectaring on Long-stemmed Buckwheat (Eriogonum elongatum) next to Palmer-Evy Mtwy.

Although Mournful and Funereal Duskywings can be hard to distinguish, I am pretty sure this is Funeral. Funereal Duskywings have more elongated forewings and a relatively larger triangular shaped hind wing. They also tend to be a colder brown, with relatively uniform dark forewings with little mottling and a distinct pale area towards the wing tip.

Mournful duskywings tend to be a warmer brown with distinct mottling on the forewing and lack the pale area towards the wing tip.

Photos / Sounds

What

Blue Elder Sambucus cerulea

Observer

nvhamlett

Date

September 8, 2019 10:57 AM PDT

Description

This Blue Elderberry was growing by the side of Palmer-Evey Mtwy on the bank above the stream in Evey Canyon. Other trees nearby included willows and oaks. Blue Elderberry is the only Sambucus sp. in our area, and the berries are blue (not black).

Note that the current Jepson name for this species is Sambucus nigra subsp. caerulea.

Photos / Sounds

What

Acorn Woodpecker Melanerpes formicivorus

Observer

nvhamlett

Date

September 8, 2019 10:54 AM PDT

Description

This Acorn Woodpecker was very busy pecking at this dead branch of an oak tree next to Palmer-Evey Mtwy. This branch was full of the acorn-sized holes that show it was being used as a granary by the Acorn Woodpeckers. I'm not sure if this bird was making holes, getting insects, getting acorns out, or what. It didn't seem to be putting acorns in.

Photos / Sounds

What

California Mugwort Artemisia douglasiana

Observer

nvhamlett

Date

September 8, 2019 10:10 AM PDT

Description

This approximately 4-foot tall plant was growing on the shady bank above the flowing stream in Evey Canyon. The leaves were mostly entire, dark green and not noticeably hairy above, but white and hairy on the underside. The inflorescences were nodding and bell-like. It is a good fit with Jepson description of Artemisia douglasiana.

I am, however, more used to seeing A. douglasiana with jagged or lobed leaf margins, like this, so the identification is a bit tentative. The Jepson description, however, says the leaves may be entire. I wonder if the leaf form varies at all with growth conditions?

Photos / Sounds

What

White Alder Alnus rhombifolia

Observer

nvhamlett

Date

September 8, 2019 09:55 AM PDT

Description

This alder was growing on the bank above the rushing stream in Evey Canyon. It must be White Alder, as that is the only alder that grows in our area. See, for instance, the Jepson filtered key for our region.

Photos / Sounds

What

Saw-toothed Goldenbush Hazardia squarrosa

Observer

nvhamlett

Date

September 8, 2019 01:15 PM PDT

Description

Growing on the side of Palmer-Evey Mtwy. There are a number of these plants in the Park. I have been seeing these for a while and have just been waiting for them to bloom so I could figure out what they were. I am confident this is Hazardia squarrosa, but I'm not sure which variety. Can anyone tell?

Photos / Sounds

Observer

nvhamlett

Date

September 8, 2019 11:50 AM PDT

Description

This robber fly was just perch on this twig – laying in wait for prey, I presume. Fortunately for the photographer, it stayed still for quite a while,

Photos / Sounds

What

Broad-leaved Cattail Typha latifolia

Observer

nvhamlett

Date

September 8, 2019 10:42 AM PDT

Description

These cattails were growing in the stream in bottom of Evey Canyon. They were perhaps 8-10' tall. Unfortunately, there were no fruits on the plants, but the growth form and the large broad, flat leaves suggest that these are Typha latifolia.

I am very familiar with Broadleaf Cattails. I spent the day before this observation cutting them back at the Bernard Field Station lake.

Photos / Sounds

What

Pale Smartweed Persicaria lapathifolia

Observer

nvhamlett

Date

September 8, 2019 09:56 AM PDT

Description

This approximately 3'-tall plant was growing in the shade on the bank of a rushing stream in Evey Canyon. It was right next to this Stachys albens.

The species ID is a bit tentative, but P. lapathifolia seems the best fit, matching this description from Illinois Wildflowers:

"This annual plant is about 2½–4' tall, branching occasionally. The stems are light green, terete, hairless, and somewhat swollen at the petiole bases. The alternate leaves are up to 8" long and 2" across; they are medium to dark green, lanceolate, glabrous or slightly pubescent, and their margins are smooth. At the petiole bases, there are membranous sheaths (ocreae) that wrap around the stems. These sheaths often have longitudinal ribs, but they lack bristles along their upper margins. With age, the sheaths gradually turn brown and peel away. The upper stems terminate in spike-like racemes of flowers. These racemes are about 2-8" long, and they droop conspicuously downward. The small flowers are densely crowded together along the length of each raceme.

"Each flower is about 1/8" (3 mm.) long, consisting of 5 tepals and the reproductive organs. These tepals are usually white or greenish white; less often they are light pink. Because the flowers don't open fully, the inner tepals can be difficult to observe. The flowers have inconspicuous pedicels (less than 1 mm. in length). The blooming period occurs from mid-summer to early fall, and lasts about 1½-2 months."

Photos / Sounds

What

Douglas' Threadleaf Ragwort Senecio flaccidus var. douglasii

Observer

nvhamlett

Date

September 8, 2019 12:44 PM PDT

Description

Growing on the side of Palmer-Evey Mtwy. The butterfly is a Woodland Skipper, which has its own observation.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Woodland Skipper Ochlodes sylvanoides

Observer

nvhamlett

Date

September 8, 2019 12:44 PM PDT

Description

Nectaring on Threadleaf Ragwort (Senecio flaccidusi var. douglasii) at the side of Palmer-Evey Mtwy.

Photos / Sounds

What

Greenspot Nightshade Solanum douglasii

Observer

nvhamlett

Date

September 8, 2019 09:52 AM PDT

Description

An approximately 3'-tall plant growing next to the stream in Evey Canyon.

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Chaparral Yucca Hesperoyucca whipplei

Observer

nvhamlett

Date

September 8, 2019 09:48 AM PDT

Description

Growing on the roadside cliff next to Evey-Palmer Mtwy.

Photos / Sounds

What

Scarlet Monkeyflower Erythranthe cardinalis

Observer

nvhamlett

Date

September 8, 2019 09:44 AM PDT

Description

A number of these monkeyflowers were growing on the bank of the rushing stream in Evey Canyon.

There's bonus insect on the flower, but it's too small and blurry to tell what it is.

Photos / Sounds

What

Whitestem Hedgenettle Stachys albens

Observer

nvhamlett

Date

September 8, 2019 09:43 AM PDT

Description

This plant was growing in a riparian area in Evey Canyon, right by the stream, which had a good quantity of rushing water. The plant was maybe 2-3' tall, the leaves were very soft – not stiff or leathery, and the largest leaves were about 4" long. The stem was square.

This is a new plant to me. Might it be a Stachys species?

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

California Sister Adelpha californica

Observer

nvhamlett

Date

September 8, 2019 09:40 AM PDT

Description

In a Mountain Mahogany (Cercocarpus betuloides) in Evey Canyon. No idea why it was hanging upside down!

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Western Yellowjacket Vespula pensylvanica

Observer

nvhamlett

Date

September 8, 2019 11:31 AM PDT

Description

This Observation is for the prey. The robber fly has its own observation.

Photos / Sounds

Observer

nvhamlett

Date

September 8, 2019 11:31 AM PDT

Description

This robber fly had captured a Western Yellowjacket (Vespula pensylvanica) and was sitting with it on a stem of dried vegetation. The Yellowjacket prey is getting its own Observation.

The ID is tentative, but it looks like Stenopogon that we've seen at the Bernard Field Station.

This is the same individual as in this post – just larger, closer photos.

Photos / Sounds

What

American Lady Vanessa virginiensis

Observer

nvhamlett

Date

September 8, 2019 01:43 PM PDT

Description

American Lady nectaring on what I think is a shrubby Ericameria species – I'm not sure which one. I'll add it if I fine out.

The two large eyespots on the underside of the hindwing, and the tiny white dot on the upperside of the forewing identify this butterfly as an American Lady.

Photos / Sounds

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What

Band-tailed Pigeon Patagioenas fasciata

Observer

nvhamlett

Date

September 8, 2019 02:06 PM PDT

Description

Band-tailed Pigeon in a riparian forest area next to Evey Canyon.

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