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Taller de Fotografía para Niños - Domingo, July 21, 2019 at 8:30 AM – 1 PM -Jardín Botánico

https://www.facebook.com/naturebyovergenius/

¡VEN A NUESTRO TALLER DE FOTOGRAFÍA Y ÚNETE!
Queremos que muchos niños se sumen a nuestro proyecto para documentar la Naturaleza de Guatemala :) 🦜🐸 🦎 🐿 Si tienes niños más chicos o más grandes, ¡No importa!. Ven y aprendamos juntos. :) :) ¡Trae tu refacción y comparte con tu familia y amigos este 21 de Julio al Jardín Botánico! Ingreso Q3.00 por persona.

Come to our photography workshop and join us!
We want many children to join our project to document the nature of Guatemala :) 🦜🐸 🦎 🐿 if you have children more boys or bigger, it doesn't matter!. Come and learn together. :) :) bring your spare and share with your family and friends this July 21th to the botanical garden! Income Q3. 00 per person

Posted on July 18, 2019 17:52 by friel friel | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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[OhioDragonfly] Mid-July Update!

Hi Everyone,

The heat is killer, but that doesn't seem to be stopping most of you. Thanks again for all of your help, past and present. If you are out in the field in the next couple of days, make sure to take plenty of water and recognize the signs of heat exhaustion and heat stroke (See: https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/extremeheat/warning.html). All of you are important, so don't push yourselves too far for the dragonflies. If you do go out in the field in this heat, make it a game where you take an extra drink of water for every dragonfly you see doing the obelisk pose (meaning it is so hot, that it is trying to minimize the surface area and decrease heat).

We have surpassed 50,000 records on iNaturalist!

A note from Jim Lemon:
The general summary is that "We will be over 14,000 observations for 2019 by the end of the week, from over 500 different observers, representing 125 species so far".
"We have two [species] now with 2019 observations in all Ohio Counties – Blue Dasher and Common Whitetail. [Species close to being observed in all counties include]: Eastern Pondhawk (85), Fragile Forktail (84), Eastern Forktail (83), Widow Skimmer (82).
These numbers are changing every day – we are averaging over 330 submissions per day, July is on track to be our first 10,000 observation month."

Jim's expanded note and map is formatted as a blog on the webpage here: https://u.osu.edu/ohioodonatasurvey/2019/07/18/2019-revised-map-updates/

Also, a note from Bill Hull: “watch out for odes that might be moving north with the blast of wind and heat from the south. I saw a “Red” Saddlebags fly over my urban yard a little bit ago that I suspect was a real Red Saddlebags. In particular, people should watch for Red and Striped Saddlebags and Band-winged Dragonlets.”

Other updates:
A Symposium on "WETLANDS MITIGATING HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOMS SYMPOSIUM
IN NORTHERN OHIO" will take place on Saturday August 3 in Huron, Ohio. Registration is $30 for regular attendees or $15 for students. Registration can be found on the Ohio Wetlands Association page here: https://www.ohwetlands.org/

Little Blue Dragonlets (Blue Dasher look-alikes) have been rediscovered in Ohio! If you see any Blue Dashers with a lot more blue on their thorax and a black instead of white face, make sure to photo document it! You might have a Little Blue Dragonlet! The known sites are currently restricted access, so it would be awesome to find them in more locations. This will be most likely in Southern Ohio. We have a historical record from Vinton County in 1933, but it has been photo documented in Pike County this year by Nina Harfmann.

It is also now season for Swift Setwings! We are up to 9 counties so far. Where will we document them this year?? Check quarry lakes, but they might show up in any habitat (small ponds, big rivers).

Lilypad Forktails are also out! Check sites with White Waterlily, but don't overlook damselflies on watershield either! We spotted some at Mothapalooza last weekend, with only watershield and spatterdock plants visible.

Other upcoming events:
July 19-20 Coyote Run Bioblitz (Pickerington, Ohio) Join us to document as many species of all living organisms as we can in 24 hours! Make sure to register! https://www.ohwetlands.org/bioblitz-2019.html
July 20 Clean-Up at Delaware Lake (Delaware, Ohio) Use a canoe and kayak to help clean up the lake. Maybe even document some dragonflies while you are on the water? Register on their webpage. https://www.eventbrite.com/e/clean-up-at-delaware-lake-tickets-61152769580
July 21 Chadwick Arboretum Open House (Columbus, Ohio) Enjoy the annual arboretum open house for a chance to see dragonflies and damselflies.
July 27, 2019 2-3 PM Surveying for Dragonflies at Mill Stream Run Reservation (Berea, Ohio) Join Naturalist Marty Calabrese for another opportunity to observe dragonflies and damselflies. Observations will be uploaded to Ohio Odonata Survey via iNaturalist. ID skills not required. Nets provided.
August 3, 2019 2 PM Dragonfly Exploration (Lima, Ohio) McLean Teddy Bear Park [2004 N Dixie Hwy, Lima, OH 45801] Join a naturalist for a short presentation on these incredible insects followed by fun activities! Learn why dragon and damselflies are important for wetlands, how to safely handle dragons, and much more. Try your hand at using dip nets to find nymphs or practice with your camera to document species for a statewide survey. Some nets will be provided, be prepared for the weather and to get your feet wet/muddy.
(more events the rest of the summer listed on the webpage)

Am I missing other water related events? Do you want one near you? Let me know and I will try to work something out!

Stay hydrated,
MaLisa Spring
State Coordinator of the Ohio Dragonfly Survey

Posted on July 18, 2019 16:48 by malisaspring malisaspring | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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On some new or poorly-known millipedes from Chile and Argentina (Diplopoda)

ABSTRACT. A fresh collection of Diplopoda from Chile and Argentina appears to contain 16 identifiable species, mostly richly illustrated, among which four are new: Argentocricus iguazu sp.n. (Rhinocricidae, Spirobolida) from Argentina, as well as Semnosoma eskovi sp.n., Abatodesmus simplicior sp.n. and Anaulacodesmus bifidus sp.n. (all Dalodesmidae, Polydesmida) from Chile.The following new synonymy is established: Monenchodesmus inermis Silvestri, 1903 = Monenchodesmus inermis nahuelhuapiensis Schubart, 1954 = Monenchodesmus tiganus Chamberlin, 1957, syn.n. (the validname the first). The species Anaulacodesmus lacustris Schubart, 1954, previously known only from the Andean parts of Argentina bordering on Chile, is recorded from Chile for the first time.

Descarga Directa: https://mega.nz/#!HpNEVQgQ!Q9IWKLWWHLQYaHF7S8rRvMb61pEEr5CUaWMKDmkDq4w

Posted on July 18, 2019 12:20 by gmalonso gmalonso | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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National Moth Week 2019 - July 20th to July 28th

http://nationalmothweek.org/register-a-nmw-event-2019/

Still time to register - even for private events that contribute to raising awareness

I will be running a private event on Sat 27th, probably (weather permitting), but have many other priorities ongoing, so my involvement is limitied this year

Posted on July 18, 2019 09:10 by hkmoths hkmoths | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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National Moth Week 2019

http://nationalmothweek.org/register-a-nmw-event-2019/

Still time to register - even for private events that contribute to raising awareness

Posted on July 18, 2019 09:03 by hkmoths hkmoths | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Big Forest Find - Deepdale 20th July

The next Big Forest Find event is this Saturday the 20th July. This guided walk into Deepdale, Dalby aims to see the fantastic wildlife found at Deepdale Meadow. We expect to find a range of orchids and weather permitting many butterflies including dark green fritillary and if we are lucky dingy skipper or small pearl bordered fritillary.

The walk starts at 10:00 from Bickley Gate car park and will finish there at 13:00. The walk is approximately 1.3km long and there is a hill down into the valley, which we will return back up to the car park.

Please book onto this event by emailing Keith.mcsweeney@forestryengland.uk so I can give you more details about the event.

There is also a wildlife survey being completed on the day as well so this is a great opportunity to see wildlife monitoring in progress.

I am looking forward to a great morning of discovery.

Keith

Posted on July 18, 2019 07:51 by keithyfd keithyfd | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Hwy 100 in Chester Co.

Cooper, we need to extend the project area farther along Hwy 100 to extend through Chickasaw State Forest in Chester Co., TN. This area historically supported shortleaf pine savanna on the rolling uplands.

Posted on July 18, 2019 05:15 by destes destes | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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KEEP POSTING TO WIN!

A warm welcome to anyone who has just joined and submitted observations to the Yukon Invasive Species Project Page. Keep the posts coming. If you post before July 29th, you will be entered into a draw for a $50 gift card to Mac's Fireweed bookstore.

Check out our webpage for the 20+ invasive species on our watchlist:
www.yukoninvasives.com

Thanks for keeping Yukon, natural.

YISC

Posted on July 18, 2019 05:03 by carm_tree carm_tree | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Psychidae resources

Here's a short list of resources that may help you identify Australian Psychidae and learn more about them. Please let me know of any other sites to add to the list.
- Lepidoptera House http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/psyc/psychidae.html
- Brisbane Insects https://www.brisbaneinsects.com/brisbane_moths/PSYCHIDAE.htm
- Atlas of Living Australia https://bie.ala.org.au/species/NZOR-6-63020

While not specifically about Australian Psychidae, I highly recommend the following article:
Rhainds, Marc & Davis, Donald & W Price, Peter. (2008). Bionomics of Bagworms (Lepidoptera: Psychidae)*. Annual review of entomology. 54. 209-26. 10.1146/annurev.ento.54.110807.090448.
https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/95f7/7ae7bcf86bd875e68c4e5855d99f72c65797.pdf
It provides a interesting overview of the lifecycle of Psychidae.

Posted on July 18, 2019 02:09 by casemothcapers casemothcapers | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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July 17: Canada Bonita and the Wood Lilies

I took a quick dash up to Canada Bonita early this morning to see how the small population of Wood Lilies (Lilium philidelphicum) was fairing. Two weeks ago, I'd found a couple basal rosettes that seemed gnawed on, and based on the one bloom I did find today, I'd say the two or three hailstorms of the past 10 days haven't been kind to the lilies. But they are hanging on!

The Whipple's Penstemons (Penstemon whippleanus) are out, and there are more Nodding Sunflowers (Helianthella quinquenervis) than I've ever seen up that way, not to mention a profusion of Owl's-claws (Hymenoxys hoopesii). A few Parry's Goldenrods were peeking through the green mass in the open woods. Missing so far are Mariposa Lilies (although I didn't make an exhaustive search) and Orange Skyflower, which probably isn't due to bloom for a couple weeks. Nodding Groundsel buds were evident. Overall it was a colorful walk.

(Photos at the bottom of the list, or visit https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/plants-of-los-alamos-county-nm-2019.

Family Genus Species JMP common name
Amaryllidaceae Allium cernuum nodding onion
Amaryllidaceae Allium geyeri Geyer's onion
Apiaceae Pseudocymopterus montanus mountain parsley
Asteraceae Achillea millefolium yarrow
Asteraceae Artemisia franserioides ragweed sagebrush
Asteraceae Brickelliastrum fendleri Fendler's brickellbush
Asteraceae Cirsium parryi Parry's thistle
Asteraceae Erigeron eximius spruce-fir fleabane
Asteraceae Erigeron subtrinervis three-nerved fleabane
Asteraceae Erigeron flagellaris trailing fleabane
Asteraceae Erigeron formosissimus most beautiful fleabane
Asteraceae Helianthella quinquenervis nodding sunflower
Asteraceae Hymenoxys hoopesii owl's-claws
Asteraceae Oreochrysum parryi Parry's goldenrod
Asteraceae Rudbeckia hirta black-eyed Susan
Asteraceae Taraxacum officinale common dandelion
Brassicaceae Descurainia incisa mountain tansymustard
Brassicaceae Erysimum capitatum western wallflower
Campanulaceae Campanula rotundifolia harebell
Caprifoliaceae Valeriana edulis tobacco root
Caryophyllaceae Cerastium arvense meadow chickweed
Caryophyllaceae Eremogone fendleri Fendler's sandwort
Fabaceae Trifolium pratense red clover
Fabaceae Trifolium repens white clover
Fabaceae Vicia americana American vetch
Gentianaceae Frasera speciosa deer's ears
Geraniaceae Geranium caespitosum purple geranium
Geraniaceae Geranium richardsonii Richardson's geranium
Iridaceae Iris missouriensis wild iris
Liliaceae Lilium philadelphicum wood lily
Linaceae Linum lewisii western blue flax
Onagraceae Chamerion angustifolium fireweed
Orobanchaceae Castilleja nelsonii Southern Mountain Paintbrush
Orobanchaceae Castilleja miniata scarlet paintbrush
Orobanchaceae Pedicularis procera fern-leafed lousewort
Plantaginaceae Penstemon strictus Rocky Mountain penstemon
Plantaginaceae Penstemon whippleanus Whipple's penstemon
Plantaginaceae Plantago major common plantain
Plantaginaceae Synthyris plantaginea kittentails
Polemoniaceae Ipomopsis aggregata skyrocket
Ranunculaceae Thalictrum fendleri Fendler's meadowrue
Rosaceae Dasiphora fruticosa shrub potentilla
Rosaceae Potentilla hippiana woolly cinquefoil
Rosaceae Potentilla pulcherrima beautiful cinquefoil
Rosaceae Rosa woodsii Woods' rose
Rosaceae Rubus parviflorus thimbleberry
Rubiaceae Galium aparine goosegrass
Rubiaceae Galium boreale northern bedstraw
Saxifragaceae Heuchera parvifolia alumroot
Scrophulariaceae Verbascum thapsus mullein

Posted on July 18, 2019 01:25 by craigmartin craigmartin | 5 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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this is a test

this is a test to see if people who are mentioned in journal posts receive notifications @yarnallj? (published immediately)

Posted on July 18, 2019 01:21 by loarie loarie | 0 comments | Leave a comment
508 icon thumb

this is a test

this is a test to see if people who are mentioned in journal posts receive notifications @yarnallj? (edited after)

Posted on July 18, 2019 01:15 by loarie loarie | 0 comments | Leave a comment
508 icon thumb

this is a test

this is a test to see if people who are mentioned in journal posts receive notifications @yarnallj? (published immediately)

Posted on July 18, 2019 00:31 by loarie loarie | 0 comments | Leave a comment
508 icon thumb

this is a test

this is a test to see if people who are mentioned in journal posts receive notifications @yarnallj? (saved a draft then edited the post then published)

Posted on July 18, 2019 00:30 by loarie loarie | 0 comments | Leave a comment
508 icon thumb

this is a test

this is a test to see if people who are mentioned in journal posts receive notifications @yarnallj? (saved a draft then published)

Posted on July 18, 2019 00:30 by loarie loarie | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Personal Milestone

Hi Aldinga Bay Observers ...
My latest observation of a deceased Prion (https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/28979538) brings my personal observation total to 300 ... 282 of which have been in the Aldinga Bay Project area!
Having walked the 3 km to the end of Shark Bay (Sellicks Beach South) and back thousands of times now, you'd think there would be nothing new to find. But like that famous 'magic pudding', there seems to be an endless supply of new discoveries to make.
For example, the following three obs - all found in the past couple of months - are things that I hadn't previously seen in the past 20 odd years of walking this stretch of coast -
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/28776930
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/28098887
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/26232196
Collectively, we are steadily documenting the amazing variety of marine life in the Aldinga Bay area ... keep 'em coming!

Posted on July 18, 2019 00:27 by wamoz wamoz | 1 comments | Leave a comment
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California animal rescue group needs help caring for 89 baby birds.

An animal rescue group is asking for help caring for 89 baby snowy egrets and black-crowned night herons left homeless last week after a tree fell in downtown Oakland.

https://www.kcra.com/amp/article/california-animal-rescue-group-needs-help-caring-for-89-baby-birds/28424826

Posted on July 18, 2019 00:10 by biohexx1 biohexx1 | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Species that didn't make it into an observation

Common Violet
Slippery Elm
Bitternut Hickory
Path Rush
Chinese wisteria
Hosta species
Beefsteak plant Perilla Frutescens
Mugwort
tree of heaven
Princess Tree
Box Elder
Umbrella Magnolia
Osage Orange

Posted on July 17, 2019 21:16 by bignonia bignonia | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Help Conserve Monarch Butterflies by Being Part of a Monitoring Network across North America

Join hundreds of volunteers in Canada, Mexico and the United States, from 27 July to 4 August, for the 2019 International Monarch Monitoring Blitz (the Blitz) and be part of this regional initiative to help conserve the monarch butterfly. By participating, you can help monarch experts gain more information to understand the distribution of the migratory monarch butterfly in North America.

“Observations from the public can help scientists gain valuable information that will support regional efforts to protect the monarch butterfly and its habitat all along its migratory flyways,” said André-Philippe Drapeau Picard, Mission Monarch coordinator at the Insectarium/Montréal Space for Life.

For one week, the Blitz invites people across North America to go out to gardens, parks and green areas and monitor milkweed plants for monarch eggs, caterpillars, chrysalises and butterflies. This information will help researchers identify priority areas for monarch conservation actions. Data gathered during the Blitz will be uploaded to the Trinational Monarch Knowledge Network, where they will be accessible for anyone to consult and download.

To take part in the Blitz, go to Mission Monarch page if you are in Canada. If you are east of the Rocky Mountains in the United States, follow the Monarch Larva Monitoring Project link, and if you are west of the Rocky Mountains, use the link for the Western Monarch and Milkweed Mapper. In Mexico, you can go to Naturalista. Or, simply follow the Blitz on social media, using the hashtag #MonarchBlitz.

Monarch butterfly overwintering sites were first recorded by scientists in California over 200 years ago and in Mexico in 1975. Since then, the monarch has become an emblematic species for North America. After an alarming decrease in its populations over the last 20 years, the eastern monarch population overwintering in central Mexico showed a significant increase this past winter. However, the population is still well below historic levels, which inspires questions about what conservation efforts are needed to continue this positive trend.

Meanwhile, the western monarch overwintering population along coastal California hit an all-time low this winter, with less than 1% of the historic population size remaining. Public participation in community science in the West is more important than ever to help understand and reverse this population’s dramatic decline.

“The majestic monarch butterfly, a flagship North American pollinator and symbol of international cooperation, needs your help with its spectacular annual migration across the continent. Join us by contributing to the International Monarch Monitoring Blitz,” says Cora Lund Preston, Communications Specialist at the Monarch Joint Venture.

The Blitz is an initiative of the Trinational Monarch Conservation Science Partnership, created through the Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC). Through the Blitz, scientists from the Insectarium/Montréal Space for Life, Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC), Monarch Joint Venture, Journey North, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, and Mexico's Comisión Nacional de Áreas Naturales Protegidas(Conanp) are asking the public to help them understand monarch and milkweed distribution throughout North America.

Media Contact - CEC
Sarah Julien
sjulien@cec.org
514 781 2781

Monarch Project Lead - CEC
Georgina O’Farrill
gofarrill@cec.org

Blitz Coordinator - Insectarium/Montréal Space for Life
André-Philippe Drapeau Picard
xdrapan@ville.montreal.qc.ca

FACTS ABOUT THE 2018 MONARCH BLITZ

Community science, also called citizen science and participatory science, is the process by which non-scientists contribute actively and voluntarily to research projects.
486 participants across Canada, Mexico, and the United States
1,323 observations
53,588 milkweed plants monitored
13,796 monarchs observed
6,905 eggs
4,900 caterpillars
470 chrysalises
1,521 butterflies
FACTS ABOUT THE MONARCH

Monarch butterflies weigh less than a gram.
There are two recognized migratory routes in North America: Eastern and Western.
Migration covers 3,000-5,000 km (2,000 to 3,000 miles) that span over three countries.
The Eastern migratory population has declined by more than 80% in 20 years, while the Western population has declined by more than 90%.
Everyone can help the monarch by participating in community science, creating habitat and spreading the word.
COLLABORATORS
The Blitz is an initiative of the Trinational Monarch Conservation Science Partnership, which includes the following organizations:

Comisión Nacional de Áreas Naturales Protegidas
The National Commission of Natural Protected Areas (Conanp) is an agency of the federal government of Mexico in charge of the administration of the protected natural areas. @GobiernoMX

US Fish and Wildlife Service
The US Fish and Wildlife Service is a leader in fish and wildlife conservation, known for its scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources. @USFWS

Insectarium/Montréal Space for Life
The Space for Life’s Insectarium is the largest museum in North America entirely dedicated to insects, immersing humans into the insect universe. @EspacePourLaVie

Monarch Joint Venture
The Monarch Joint Venture is a partnership of organizations working together to conserve the monarch migration for future generations. Journey North
Journey North is an international citizen science project of the University of Wisconsin-Madison Arboretum that engages citizen scientists in a global study of wildlife migration and seasonal change. @journeynorth.org

Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation
The Xerces Society is a nonprofit organization that protects the natural world by conserving invertebrates and their habitat. @xercessociety

Posted on July 17, 2019 19:41 by smcknight smcknight | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Mid-Summer Update

Hi everyone! This past week has been busy at the Tobin Preserve! Last weekend the Kent Land Trust and I held a hike at the Tobin Preserve following the board meeting that morning. We opened the hike up to the public so that it could be apart of the Kent Land Trust’s summer exploration challenge. I also used this hike as a way to introduce myself and educate more people about what I have been up to this summer, especially iNaturalist. We were able to hike the Meadow Trail leading to the Stone Wall Trail. We had beautiful weather, some great conversations, and were able to meet some new people. Then this past Wednesday, we had a camp group from the Sharon Audubon come for a bird banding demonstration. The kids had a lot of fun learning about bird banding, having a chance to touch and/or release some of the birds caught that morning, and most importantly increase their knowledge about birds by performing identifications!

Lots of fun happening here at the Tobin Preserve! Be sure to stay on the lookout for our next event! For more information, email info@kentlandtrust.org :)

Posted on July 17, 2019 19:39 by alexisfreudenberg alexisfreudenberg | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Bioblitz this Saturday, July 20, noon to 3pm

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/nature-nerd-bioblitz-at-point-molate-richmond-ca-2-tickets-64698490928

It's our second one. We're working with the Point Molate Alliance to keep some really inappropriate luxury housing from being built along the shoreline at Point Molate. Afterwards we're going over to the Marina for swing dancing.

Posted on July 17, 2019 19:09 by hydrocycler hydrocycler | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Noteworthy finds in Lawrence County during the July 2019 expedition.

Odes by Day, Moths by Night: Wayne NF-Ironton Unit
A listing of the insect fauna within the Wayne National Forest - Ironton Unit, Lawrence County, OH.
Cumulative observations here ...
https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/odes-by-day-moths-by-night-wayne-nf-ironton-unit

The effort included dragonfly surveys of Hanging Rock OHV, Lake Vesuvius, Timbre Ridge Lake, and Smith Hollow Lake from Sunday 7 July through Wed. 10 July. Several Ironton Unit wetlands in Gallia and Scioto Counties were visited (e.g. Cadmus , Sand Fork, Superior, Wolcott) but are not included in this review of Lawrence County.

UV Lights were set up at three different campsites No. 32 (Sun), No. 31 (Mon), and No. 9 (Tue). for mothing etc. Conditions were ideal Sun evening with heavy cloud cover, little wind, high heat and humidity.

Taxonomic Breakdown of Observations
Odonata: 24 species, 78 observations
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations?place_id=any&project_id=odes-by-day-moths-by-night-wayne-nf-ironton-unit&taxon_id=47792&verifiable=any&view=species

Coleoptera: 18 species, 26 observations
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations?place_id=any&project_id=odes-by-day-moths-by-night-wayne-nf-ironton-unit&taxon_id=47208&verifiable=any&view=species

Lepidoptera: 150 species, 318 observations (includes 6 species of butterfly, 7 obs.)
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations?place_id=any&project_id=odes-by-day-moths-by-night-wayne-nf-ironton-unit&taxon_id=47157&verifiable=any&view=species

plus 17 other observations of invertebrates.

---------------------------------

Noteworthy finds in Lawrence County during the July 2019 expedition.
According to the Ohio Dragonfly Survey, the following species of Odonata were added to the county list.

Comet Darner - Hanging Rock OHV park
Powdered Dancer - Lake Vesuvius (below the dam)

Relocated:

Swift Setwing (state rarity) was first located in the county at Lake Vesuvius in 2018. It was relocated there on this visit. An observation at Hanging Rock OHV park adds a new location for the species.

---------------------

Rare moths:

... a southern species north.

the Black-marked Inga Moth, Inga sparsiciliella, is normally found south of the Mason-Dixon line save for the eastern seaboard where it ventures to central NJ. They have been observed as near to Ohio as the Daniel Boone forest near Booneville, KY*. This is roughly 95 miles to the sw.
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/28992139

*checked against Moth Photographers Group map here ...
http://mothphotographersgroup.msstate.edu/large_map.php?hodges=1034

Posted on July 17, 2019 17:37 by vicfazio3 vicfazio3 | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Indonesia - iNaturalist World Tour

For the 24th stop on the iNaturalist World Tour we head to Indonesia. Indonesia is home to some of the best coral reefs in the world and this is reflected in the top observers - at least 4 of whom are avid divers and prolific underwater observers (e.g. @maractwin, @lovelyclemmy, @davidr, @timcameron). There are also top users based in Indonesia. @brunodurand splits his time between France and Bali. @jasonalexander is from Indonesia but is currently studying in Canada. @naufalurfi, a student at Universitas Gadjah Mada in Yogyakarta, and perhaps the mysterious @franzanth are among the few top observers who appear to be based in Indonesia year round.


I suspect the 'spike-y' nature of the observations per month chart is a result of visits by super observers like @maractwin. But the number of observations per month has grown quite dramatically in Indonesia in recent months. It would be interesting to know whats driving this.


@maractwin is not only the top observer in Indonesia, but also the top identifier overall and the top fish identifier. That fish are the second most 'observose' category in Indonesia is a testament to the hard work of underwater observers and identifiers like @maractwin. The top identifiers in Indonesia for the most part seem to be a cross-section of super identifiers from around the world (e.g. @briangooding, @tom-kirschey-nabu, @zizou, @kemper, @charliev, @hsini_lin, @ongzi) with @naufalurfi brining local expertise for arachnids.


It looks like there's potential to make improvements needed to get more Indonesians involved and maybe the diving community. What can we do to help? Please share your thoughts below or on this forum thread

@maractwin @lovelyclemmy @franzanth @brunodurand @davidr @naufalurfi @tom-kirschey-nabu @zizou @kemper @charliev

We’ll be back tomorrow with Belgium!

Posted on July 17, 2019 16:50 by loarie loarie | 16 comments | Leave a comment
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HOW-TO TIP: Bird Observations

iNaturalist is used to report an observation of a single individual of a single species, so it’s not the best option to document a birding excursion which records multiple individuals and species during a specific time period. However, if you observe a bird that isn’t on an eBird checklist (and have a photo or sound), please make an iNaturalist observation to report it. IMPORTANT! eBird users, please share your checklist with the username: CharliePainterBioblitz.
A list of birds in the BioBlitz area during July is available at http://www.arizonabirder.com/pdf/Arizona-Field-Checklist-July.pdf. Copies will be available at the event table. The list is helpful to track and tally the number of species you saw. If you do not use eBird, please turn your annotated lists in at the end of the event.

Posted on July 17, 2019 15:12 by andybridges andybridges | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Scallop Survey results are in.

I haven't seen abundance survey results like this in forever!
https://myfwc.com/research/saltwater/mollusc/bay-scallops/season/
Very encouraging considering all the issues in the bay as of late. Good to see the season and limit changes and other conservation measures paying off. I also can't help but wonder if the breach and subsequent influx of salt water from the hurricane helped. Let's hope this positive trend continues for a while!

Posted on July 17, 2019 14:23 by rogerbirkhead rogerbirkhead | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Noteworthy finds in Lawrence County during the July 2019 expedition.

According to the Ohio Dragonfly Survey, the following species of Odonata were added to the county list.

Comet Darner - Hanging Rock OHV park
Powdered Dancer - Lake Vesuvius (below the dam)

Relocated:

Swift Setwing (state rarity) was first located in the county at Lake Vesuvius in 2018. It was relocated there on this visit. An observation at Hanging Rock OHV park adds a new location for the species.

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Rare moths:

... a southern species north.

the Black-marked Inga Moth, Inga sparsiciliella, is normally found south of the Mason-Dixon line save for the eastern seaboard where it ventures to central NJ. They have been observed as near to Ohio as the Daniel Boone forest near Booneville, KY*. This is roughly 95 miles to the sw.
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/28992139

*checked against Moth Photographers Group map here ...
http://mothphotographersgroup.msstate.edu/large_map.php?hodges=1034

Local Interest

The Oyster-shelled Metrea, Cliniodes ostreonalis, was detected at Iron Ridge campground. The species is generally found through the UP of Michigan, Ontario, and the Adirondacks of upstate NY. However, a disjunct population is found along the Ohio River Valley from Louisville to Wheeling. Infrequently reported from the Ohio side.
https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/345642-Cliniodes-ostreonalis
http://mothphotographersgroup.msstate.edu/species.php?hodges=4789

Posted on July 17, 2019 13:50 by vicfazio3 vicfazio3 | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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BACKYARD BUMBLE BEE COUNT- July 13-21

Here is an iNaturalist project that complements ours - consider adding any bumble bee observations during July 13-21 (2019) to this national blitz. You will need to record a few extra pieces of information, but it will help provide useful information on some of our favorite pollinators

https://backyardbbcount.wixsite.com/bumblebeecount

Posted on July 17, 2019 10:57 by rjm2 rjm2 | 1 comments | Leave a comment
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Bobcat

Possible Bobcat sighting in Ivoryton off Comstock ave. Looked like a whitetail deer was chasing it through the yard. 7/9/2019

Posted on July 17, 2019 03:41 by lindaloha lindaloha | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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All Indian species of Euphorbia sect. Anisophyllum added

All 35 taxa known to occur in India have been added. The full list can be found here. Species on efloraofindia can be found here.

Posted on July 17, 2019 02:47 by nathantaylor nathantaylor | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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