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Malaysia Check List

Added a few plant names from Flora Malesiana website into Malaysia Check List:
-Lowiaceae
-Hernandiaceae
-Hypericaceae
-Passifloraceae

Corrected previous entries:
-

Posted on May 19, 2019 05:48 by tansh91 tansh91 | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Thanks for a great day!

Hi! It was so great meeting you all and seeing your enthusiasm for nature and budding enthusiasm for iNaturalist. :) Here's a link to the project and everything we found together:

https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/horseshoe-mound-inat-workshop

@kerstin11 @bwiesen @johnarndt @kayweibel @mary650 @mbardusk @ahelgerson @jjhepker @pmcady

Posted on May 18, 2019 23:54 by bouteloua bouteloua | 1 comments | Leave a comment
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Chandeleur Islands survey 17 May 2019 (Trip)

Matt Brady and I helped with a Red Knot Survey for BTNEP, walking a stretch of beach from here 29.934057, -88.822640 to here 29.868357, -88.830746 in a north to south direction. This was 5.8 miles on google earth, but the eBird app recorded 6.3 miles. We spent most of the time carefully counting and surveying Red Knots, particularly for banded individuals, but took great care to count all birds and photograph as many as possible. Although most of our walking was on the gulf side of the island, we crossed over to the bay side wherever there were mudflats visible and looked for shorebirds there, checking also some of the patches of vegetation of land birds and nesting sea birds, though the island was rather devoid of the former. We also looked for many other organisms as time and energy allowed. eBird list is here: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56430414. Weather was generally hot and uncomfortable, though not nearly as bad as mid-summer weather. Temps early on were around 70, rising to the mid 80s by the time we left, though it felt hotter. Completely clear skies, with a few scattered clouds late in the survey. Light winds out of the SE, building to ~5 knots by the time we left. Habitat was largely open white sand beach, with lots of shells in places forming a barrier near the gulf side. This occasionally created some standing water on the mudflats on the bay side of the barrier with shorebird habitat. Tide was dropping as we surveyed, exposing mudflats on the bay side, mostly in channels through extensive salt marsh. Between the salt marsh and the gulf shore were occasional patches of vegetation dominated by grasses and Baccaris, usually inhabited by nesting Laughing Gulls. Many shore birds and gulls were feeding on the shore on the gulf side, with many more roosting on the upper beach.

Posted on May 18, 2019 23:39 by henicorhina henicorhina | 46 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Catálogo preliminar de Saturniidae de Argentina

En éste trabajo se presenta el primer catálogo de 180 especies de Saturniidae de Argentina repartidas en 62 géneros, con la inclusión de 21 especies no citadas previamente para el país, las cuales son ilustradas y comentadas.
Los Saturniidae están entre los lepidópteros nocturnos más atractivos dado su tamaño grande, colorido y diseño. En Argentina se los halla en todo el país, con excepción de grandes altitudes (hasta los 3000 m). Éste trabajo constituye el primer listado general y actualizado de las especies que vuelan en Argentina.

Link: http://www.troplep.org/TLR-25-1-Nunez.pdf

Posted on May 18, 2019 22:00 by michelledelaloye michelledelaloye | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Join "Pollinator Bioblitz 2019" help us blitz the month of June

In honor of Pollinator Week (June 17th-23rd), Pollinator Pathways will be hosting a month long Pollinator BioBlitz. Citizen Scientist are asked to photograph bees, butterflies, mothes, beetles, and flies. Next add project “Pollinator Pathways”. Then start logging your observations. All ages and abilities are encouraged to find and explore the many species that live in your hometown, take photos, and share with scientist. You can go a step farther by joining Pollinator Pathways (pollinator-pathway.org) and planting native, nectar-producing plants in your communities, schools and backyards across the area. Pollinators can be difficult to identify, so observers are encouraged to post what they know, which may be a simple description of the species or its behavior. To take part in citizen science, participants can post a photo and more details on iNaturalist "Pollinator Bioblitz 2019". Happy pollinator week and thank you for your help in furthering our research.

Posted on May 18, 2019 20:05 by quellgarguilo quellgarguilo | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Thank you

I would like to thank each and every one of you for contributing to this wonderful citizen science website, my work would be so much more difficult without you. If anyone is interested in meeting up for a hunt or if you have a particular mushroom that you are interested in and have questions, please drop me a line and I will get back to you.
I'm not judgmental, nor will I report anyone to law enforcement for having an interest in fungi such as Psilocybe cubensis or something similar. I prefer harm reduction over causing someone legal troubles. Happy hunting.

Doc Lingo

Posted on May 18, 2019 19:06 by doc_lingo doc_lingo | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Monday, May 20: Lichen lecture in Central Park

Urban Lichens of New York City
2019 Emil Lang Lectures Series
New York Mycological Society

When:
Monday, May 20
6:00 – 8:00 pm

Where:
Arsenal, Central Park
830 5th Ave., Room 318
New York, NY 10065
Entrance at 5th Ave. and 64th St.
Take the elevator to the 3rd floor.

This lecture is free and open to the public!

Ultra-urban areas, industrial waterfronts, and populated tourist attractions are some of the unique habitats for enterprising New York City lichens. Resulting from modern improvements in air quality, alliances of fungi and algae are actively reclaiming urban spaces and increasing biodiversity. Hours of mycological observation can be enjoyed by visiting your closest street tree or concrete surface without setting foot in a park or garden. We’ll review the basics of lichen structure and identification, meet the most common urban lichens of our region, and explore urban lichen ecology.

http://newyorkmyc.org/emil-lang-lecture-series-for-2019/
https://www.facebook.com/events/593734287780385/

Nova Patch is an amateur lichenologist focusing on the urban lichens of New York City, cemetery ecology, and nature education. They are a Brooklyn-based member of the New York Mycological Society, hold a botany certificate from the New York Botanical Garden, and volunteer as an endangered plant monitor along the Appalachian Trail.

Posted on May 18, 2019 19:02 by novapatch novapatch | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Is Urospermum in Napa County?

I heard from one of you that Urospermum appeared in the Presidio on the SF peninsula shortly after some fill dirt was brought in from Napa County. It could be that the plant colonized the area of disturbance around the fill dirt...or perhaps more likely it came in with the fill dirt. There are no current observations from Napa County - I wonder if it's there?

Have a great weekend and happy Urospermum hunting!

Posted on May 18, 2019 16:15 by matt_g matt_g | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Boat Dives

Im fortunate enough to get out for a dive almost every week, and over the last few years of diving have racked up about 180 dives. 90% of those are shore dives down along the Mornington Peninsula.
There is no questioning the quality dives sites available straight out from the beach, but what about the rest of our wonderful Port Phillip Bay?
The last few months I've been making a real effort to get out for a boat dive and have used Red Boats on all occasions. ( i would love to have my own boat or 'good' friends with a bot, but im still searching).
Diving sites in the channel, reef and bombies and even some of our wreck dives. The fish are bigger, more plentiful and less skittish. The soft corals, kelp and other plant life is spectacular and as we head into winter, if you can bare the cold, the water is clearer and conditions more stable.

For those of you who havnt got out on a boat dive, do a quick search for whats available local to you and i highly recommend that you book one soon.....You may even spot a new species!

Posted on May 18, 2019 12:11 by christophermark christophermark | 1 comments | Leave a comment
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What have I gotten into!?

Shortly before the CNC and ever since, I've fallen in with these fine folks on Discord, so now I'm going to make some small effort this weekend to get out there and blitz a bit more with them:

https://inaturalist.ca/projects/discord-inaturalist-big-weekend

It's not likely I'll place well, given how insanely good at racking up observation & species numbers the best of this group are, but it's good to be around people who inspire me to keep improving on iNat. :)

If connecting online with a bunch of other iNatters to chat sounds like it's up your alley, check out the unofficial iNat Discord server at:

https://discord.gg/kHAUzVR

My handle is SyntheticBee. If you saw my mention here & came to Discord as a result, give me a shout.

Posted on May 18, 2019 11:16 by benarmstrong benarmstrong | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Malaysia Check List

Added a few plant names from Flora Malesiana website into Malaysia Check List:
-Taccaceae
-Triuridaceae
-Leeaceae
-Rafflesiaceae
-Chloranthaceae

Corrected previous entries:
-Dipterocarpus

Posted on May 18, 2019 09:39 by tansh91 tansh91 | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Excengllent Wildflower Preserve

"Preserve" might be too strong a word. Think it is city land. Tax office land maybe. Ought to check and see if LCAD has it for sale. "It" is a 2 square block parcel of overgrown land starting immediately south of the road at south Cesar Chavez Dr and MLJ Jr Blvd. It climbs the canyon wall and continues past the canyon rim. Vegetation hip-high in places. Butterflies galore. I took a walk there today to clear my head and ended up taking 115 photos in under an hour. When I go back I'll wear my knee high chippawa snake boots, not that I saw any snakes today. Too much of the walk I could not see what I was stepping on. Might have caught the merest glimpse of a lizard that was much too fast for me.

Posted on May 18, 2019 03:38 by thebark thebark | 1 comments | Leave a comment
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Poaching in Ventura County

I recently came across this article in the VC Star:

https://www.vcstar.com/story/news/special-reports/outdoors/2019/04/17/ventura-county-plant-wiped-out-santa-monica-mountains-wildfire/3382806002/

The jist of it is that apparently there are populations of Verity's dudleya which are being impacted in Ventura County. Seeing how this species is so rare already and was hit pretty hard by the 2013 Springs fire, the last thing this species needs is a targeted poaching effort.

Just wanted to share the info here and encourage folks to be vigilant.

Posted on May 18, 2019 01:40 by zabbey zabbey | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Natural Area trail improvements

Hi folks

We recently cleared the fallen box elder from the SMC trail near the Woodside end of the property. Part of the fallen tree was placed in the herd path that had formed around the obstacle to encourage use of the main trail.

A pile of wood chips was placed near the entrance and a few buckets. Feel free to load up a bucket or two with wood chips and dump them on a soggy part of the trail or on any trail location where foot traffic is wearing down to bare soil.

Our goal is to find a balance between enough traffic to keep the trail open without brush hogging, and not so much traffic as to cause erosion. We hope to do additional trail work over summer and particularly to clear the heavy tree trunk that fell closer to the cornfield.

Happy iNaturalizing

Declan

Posted on May 18, 2019 01:24 by declanmccabe declanmccabe | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Whale & Dolphin Citizen Science

The second installment of our Whale and Dolphin blog was released today. Stay tuned for real stories and scientific facts about cetaceans. In the next two weeks you can look forward to Spinner Dolphins, and an interactive look at 55 million years of whale evolution!

http://www.gringocurt.com/dont-eat-pilot-whales/

Posted on May 17, 2019 22:02 by gringocurt gringocurt | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Brown Pelicans.

The brown pelican used to nest abundantly in the California but due to eggshell thinning from DDT and the collapse of sardine populations, they now mostly breed in Baja California, though small breeding colonies have appeared in the Channel Islands. The federal government removed the brown pelican from the Endangered Species Act, so it looks like we’ll get to watch those wonderful birds with their gular sacs gulping and a-fluttering for a very long time to come.

https://www.kqed.org/perspectives/201601138657/brown-pelicans

Posted on May 17, 2019 21:19 by biohexx1 biohexx1 | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Продвигаемся вперед

Калужская область вышла на 29 место, с 567 находками обойдя Тверскую область.

Posted on May 17, 2019 19:59 by max_carabus max_carabus | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Scarlet Tanager

There have been 2 male and 1 female Scarlet Tanagers at the the suet feeders plus feeding on orange half.

Posted on May 17, 2019 14:12 by debnh debnh | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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1/16 финала Командного кубка России по фотофиксации растений: НА СТАРТ! ВНИМАНИЕ! МАРШ!

С момента публикации этого сообщения до раннего утра (по московскому времени) 21 мая 2019 г. региональные наблюдения проекта "Флора России" идут в зачет Кубка.

Фиксируем статистику:
66,788 Observations - 4,284 Species - 1,041 Identifiers - 1,622 Observers

Участником 16-й пары (как обладателя wild card) объявляется проект "Флора Ростовской области | Rostov Oblast Flora", в который за 5 дней было добавлено 263 новых наблюдения!

Сетка 1/16 кубка по результатам активности на предыдущим этапе:

1. Флора Брянской области | Bryansk Oblast Flora - Флора Подмосковья | Moscow Oblast Flora
2. Флора Чувашии | Chuvash Republic Flora - Флора Калининградской области | Kaliningrad Oblast Flora
3. Флора Москвы | Flora of Moscow - Флора Алтайского края | Altai Krai Flora
4. Флора Ярославской области | Yaroslavl Oblast Flora - Флора Приморского края | Primorsky Krai Flora
5. Флора Камчатки | Kamchatka Flora - Флора Нижегородской области | Nizhny Novgorod Oblast Flora
6. Флора Крыма | Flora of the Crimea - Флора Владимирской области | Vladimir Oblast Flora
7. Флора Новосибирской области | Novosibirsk Oblast Flora - Флора Томской области | Tomsk Oblast Flora
8. Флора Курской области | Kursk Oblast Flora - Флора Башкирии | Bashkortostan Flora
9. Флора Татарстана | Tatarstan Flora - Флора Белгородской области | Belgorod Oblast Flora
10. Флора Республики Алтай | Altai Republic Flora - Флора Калужской области | Kaluga Oblast Flora
11. Флора Дагестана | Dagestan Flora - Флора Самарской области | Samara Oblast Flora
12. Флора Тюменской области | Tyumen Oblast Flora - Флора Омской области | Omsk Oblast Flora
13. Флора Санкт-Петербурга | St Petersburg Flora - Флора Свердловской области | Sverdlovsk Oblast Flora
14. Флора Хакасии | Flora of Khakassia - Флора Тамбовской области | Tambov Oblast Flora
15. Флора Смоленской области | Smolensk Oblast Flora - Флора Кемеровской области | Kemerovo Oblast Flora
16. Флора Ульяновской области | Ulyanovsk Oblast Flora - Флора Ростовской области | Rostov Oblast Flora

Число наблюдений:

11,415
Флора Приморского края | Primorsky Krai Flora

5,731
Флора Чувашии | Chuvash Republic Flora

4,931
Флора Москвы | Flora of Moscow

4,761
Флора Алтайского края | Altai Krai Flora

4,184
Флора Подмосковья | Moscow Oblast Flora

2,283
Флора Брянской области | Bryansk Oblast Flora

2,082
Флора Татарстана | Tatarstan Flora

1,894
Флора Краснодарского края | Krasnodar Krai Flora

1,799
Флора Владимирской области | Vladimir Oblast Flora

1,692
Флора Ярославской области | Yaroslavl Oblast Flora

1,637
Флора Камчатки | Kamchatka Flora

1,552
Флора Калининградской области | Kaliningrad Oblast Flora

1,538
Флора Нижегородской области | Nizhny Novgorod Oblast Flora

1,378
Флора Крыма | Flora of the Crimea

1,197
Флора Ростовской области | Rostov Oblast Flora

983
Флора Башкирии | Bashkortostan Flora

925
Флора Санкт-Петербурга | St Petersburg Flora

917
Флора Иркутской области | Irkutsk Oblast Flora

884
Флора Самарской области | Samara Oblast Flora

875
Флора Севастополя | Sevastopol Flora

694
Флора Дагестана | Dagestan Flora

691
Флора Воронежской области | Voronezh Oblast Flora

680
Флора Томской области | Tomsk Oblast Flora

679
Флора Новосибирской области | Novosibirsk Oblast Flora

612
Флора Омской области | Omsk Oblast Flora

611
Флора Республики Алтай | Altai Republic Flora

600
Флора Ленинградской области | Leningrad Oblast Flora

571
Флора Белгородской области | Belgorod Oblast Flora

562
Флора Тверской области | Tver Oblast Flora

560
Флора Калужской области | Kaluga Oblast Flora

533
Флора Курской области | Kursk Oblast Flora

424
Флора Карачаево-Черкесии | Flora of Karachay-Cherkessia

419
Флора Югры | Flora of Khanty-Mansi Autonomous Okrug

381
Флора Тульской области | Tula Oblast Flora

368
Флора Адыгеи | Flora of Adygea

361
Флора Костромской области | Kostroma Oblast Flora

352
Флора Кемеровской области | Kemerovo Oblast Flora

272
Флора Карелии | Flora of Karelia

271
Флора Рязанской области | Ryazan Oblast Flora

269
Флора Красноярского края | Krasnoyarsk Krai Flora

223
Флора Ставрополья | Stavropol Krai Flora

219
Флора Псковской области | Pskov Oblast Flora

210
Флора Свердловской области | Sverdlovsk Oblast Flora

209
Флора Мурманской области | Murmansk Oblast Flora

206
Флора Забайкальского края | Zabaykalsky Krai Flora

187
Флора Кировской области | Kirov Oblast Flora

169
Флора Ульяновской области | Ulyanovsk Oblast Flora

167
Флора Коми | Komi Republic Flora

146
Флора Хакасии | Flora of Khakassia

145
Флора Новгородской области | Novgorod Oblast Flora

143
Флора Ямало-Ненецкого АО | Flora of Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Okrug

142
Флора Липецкой области | Lipetsk Oblast Flora

139
Флора Смоленской области | Smolensk Oblast Flora

138
Флора Бурятии | Buryat Republic Flora

137
Флора Волгоградской области | Volgograd Oblast Flora

135
Флора Тюменской области | Tyumen Oblast Flora

133
Флора Амурской области | Amur Oblast Flora

119
Флора Тамбовской области | Tambov Oblast Flora

117
Флора Пензенской области | Penza Oblast Flora

116
Флора Челябинской области | Chelyabinsk Oblast Flora

115
Флора Оренбургской области | Orenburg Oblast Flora

113
Флора Вологодской области | Vologda Oblast Flora

113
Флора Сахалинской области | Sakhalin Oblast Flora

88
Флора Марий Эл | Mari El Flora

80
Флора Архангельской области | Arkhangelsk Oblast Flora

79
Флора Якутии | Flora of Yakutia

50
Флора Пермского края | Perm Krai Flora

43
Флора Чукотки | Flora of Chukotka

40
Флора Астраханской области | Astrakhan Oblast Flora

40
Флора Саратовской области | Saratov Oblast Flora

39
Флора Ненецкого АО | Flora of Nenets Autonomous Okrug

32
Флора Хабаровского края | Khabarovsk Krai Flora

31
Флора Удмуртии | Udmurt Republic Flora

30
Флора Мордовии | Flora of Mordovia

30
Флора Орловской области | Oryol Oblast Flora

25
Флора Кабардино-Балкарии | Flora of Kabardino-Balkaria

25
Флора Тувы | Tyva Republic Flora

24
Флора Северной Осетии | Flora of North Ossetia

17
Флора Магаданской области | Magadan Oblast Flora

13
Флора Курганской области | Kurgan Oblast Flora

11
Флора Калмыкии | Flora of Kalmykia

4
Флора Ивановской области | Ivanovo Oblast Flora

2
Флора Еврейской АО | Flora of Jewish Autonomous Oblast

2
Флора Чечни | Chechen Republic Flora

1
Флора Ингушетии | Flora of Ingushetia

Число видов:

1,308
Флора Приморского края | Primorsky Krai Flora

770
Флора Подмосковья | Moscow Oblast Flora

740
Флора Алтайского края | Altai Krai Flora

725
Флора Татарстана | Tatarstan Flora

677
Флора Краснодарского края | Krasnodar Krai Flora

640
Флора Москвы | Flora of Moscow

632
Флора Чувашии | Chuvash Republic Flora

620
Флора Дагестана | Dagestan Flora

596
Флора Брянской области | Bryansk Oblast Flora

584
Флора Владимирской области | Vladimir Oblast Flora

563
Флора Камчатки | Kamchatka Flora

537
Флора Крыма | Flora of the Crimea

537
Флора Ростовской области | Rostov Oblast Flora

486
Флора Нижегородской области | Nizhny Novgorod Oblast Flora

479
Флора Ярославской области | Yaroslavl Oblast Flora

438
Флора Иркутской области | Irkutsk Oblast Flora

412
Флора Воронежской области | Voronezh Oblast Flora

391
Флора Калининградской области | Kaliningrad Oblast Flora

341
Флора Башкирии | Bashkortostan Flora

331
Флора Курской области | Kursk Oblast Flora

317
Флора Томской области | Tomsk Oblast Flora

303
Флора Ленинградской области | Leningrad Oblast Flora

301
Флора Севастополя | Sevastopol Flora

299
Флора Санкт-Петербурга | St Petersburg Flora

297
Флора Карачаево-Черкесии | Flora of Karachay-Cherkessia

284
Флора Белгородской области | Belgorod Oblast Flora

273
Флора Самарской области | Samara Oblast Flora

269
Флора Омской области | Omsk Oblast Flora

259
Флора Новосибирской области | Novosibirsk Oblast Flora

258
Флора Тверской области | Tver Oblast Flora

257
Флора Республики Алтай | Altai Republic Flora

256
Флора Югры | Flora of Khanty-Mansi Autonomous Okrug

249
Флора Тульской области | Tula Oblast Flora

246
Флора Калужской области | Kaluga Oblast Flora

233
Флора Адыгеи | Flora of Adygea

220
Флора Кемеровской области | Kemerovo Oblast Flora

202
Флора Костромской области | Kostroma Oblast Flora

173
Флора Красноярского края | Krasnoyarsk Krai Flora

171
Флора Рязанской области | Ryazan Oblast Flora

169
Флора Забайкальского края | Zabaykalsky Krai Flora

153
Флора Псковской области | Pskov Oblast Flora

153
Флора Ставрополья | Stavropol Krai Flora

142
Флора Карелии | Flora of Karelia

138
Флора Кировской области | Kirov Oblast Flora

134
Флора Свердловской области | Sverdlovsk Oblast Flora

128
Флора Мурманской области | Murmansk Oblast Flora

114
Флора Бурятии | Buryat Republic Flora

113
Флора Волгоградской области | Volgograd Oblast Flora

113
Флора Ульяновской области | Ulyanovsk Oblast Flora

111
Флора Хакасии | Flora of Khakassia

108
Флора Смоленской области | Smolensk Oblast Flora

104
Флора Амурской области | Amur Oblast Flora

103
Флора Липецкой области | Lipetsk Oblast Flora

102
Флора Тамбовской области | Tambov Oblast Flora

96
Флора Новгородской области | Novgorod Oblast Flora

89
Флора Сахалинской области | Sakhalin Oblast Flora

82
Флора Челябинской области | Chelyabinsk Oblast Flora

79
Флора Коми | Komi Republic Flora

79
Флора Тюменской области | Tyumen Oblast Flora

78
Флора Оренбургской области | Orenburg Oblast Flora

78
Флора Пензенской области | Penza Oblast Flora

76
Флора Вологодской области | Vologda Oblast Flora

73
Флора Марий Эл | Mari El Flora

68
Флора Якутии | Flora of Yakutia

66
Флора Ямало-Ненецкого АО | Flora of Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Okrug

62
Флора Архангельской области | Arkhangelsk Oblast Flora

35
Флора Пермского края | Perm Krai Flora

33
Флора Астраханской области | Astrakhan Oblast Flora

32
Флора Саратовской области | Saratov Oblast Flora

31
Флора Удмуртии | Udmurt Republic Flora

31
Флора Хабаровского края | Khabarovsk Krai Flora

30
Флора Ненецкого АО | Flora of Nenets Autonomous Okrug

29
Флора Чукотки | Flora of Chukotka

28
Флора Мордовии | Flora of Mordovia

27
Флора Орловской области | Oryol Oblast Flora

24
Флора Кабардино-Балкарии | Flora of Kabardino-Balkaria

24
Флора Тувы | Tyva Republic Flora

23
Флора Северной Осетии | Flora of North Ossetia

16
Флора Магаданской области | Magadan Oblast Flora

13
Флора Курганской области | Kurgan Oblast Flora

11
Флора Калмыкии | Flora of Kalmykia

4
Флора Ивановской области | Ivanovo Oblast Flora

2
Флора Еврейской АО | Flora of Jewish Autonomous Oblast

2
Флора Чечни | Chechen Republic Flora

1
Флора Ингушетии | Flora of Ingushetia

Внимательно читайте регламент: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/flora-of-russia/journal/24904-1-16-18-20 . В нём есть некоторые важные детали, которые помогут региональным проектам сражаться на равных даже в условиях ограниченных людских ресурсов и неблагоприятных погодных условий.

Участники могут загружать фотографии из любых регионов. Экспертам, которые будут определять растения, просьба указывать авторам фото в комментариях на типовые ошибки, если такие будут выявлены. Это касается загрузки экземпляров из культуры, необъединения фотографий в одно наблюдение, загрузки наблюдений из нескольких видов. Ссылка на пояснения: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/flora-of-russia/journal/21168- . Дополнительная просьба: при работе с географическими фильтрами не забывать отдельно просматривать фотографии Крыма и Севастополя, которые по фильтру "Russia" не видны.

На старт, внимание, марш!

Posted on May 17, 2019 12:01 by apseregin apseregin | 3 comments | Leave a comment
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Vi aspettiamo al Bioblitz del Museo di Storia Naturale della Maremma!

Ventiquattro ore non-stop alla scoperta della biodiversità nella riserva naturale statale del Belagaio e nella riserva regionale Val di Farma. È la settima edizione del Bioblitz, l'evento clou nel calendario di iniziative offerte dal Museo di storia naturale della Maremma.
Bioblitz è Citizen science, la scienza partecipata dai cittadini: non solo scienziati ma anche semplici appassionati possono cimentarsi nell'identificazione delle forme di vita che abitano quest'area.
La partecipazione al bioblitz è gratuita. Per info e preiscrizioni on-line: www.naturaesocialmapping.it
Partecipanti ed esperti raccoglieranno dati che consentiranno di descrivere in modo approfondito la biodiversità del Belagaio. Al termine di ogni attività è previsto il rientro al campo base, dove sarà possibile identificare le specie.
L’evento è patrocinato dalla Regione Toscana e dal Comune di Roccastrada e organizzato in collaborazione con il Raggruppamento carabinieri forestali, reparto biodiversità Follonica, e l'associazione Pibinko.

PROGRAMMA BIOBLITZ 2019

Sabato 18 - domenica 19 maggio
Ore 18 - 21
Esploriamo il mondo vegetale. Campionamenti botanici
I canti degli uccelli. Riconosciamolo con l’esperto.
Non meno di 6 zampe. Alla ricerca di Insetti e altri Artropodi
Insetti al crepuscolo. Alla ricerca dei Neurotteri
Chi è attratto dalla luce? Attivazione trappola luminosa per insetti

Ore 21 - 00
Chiama e rispondi. Playback di rapaci notturni
Affascinanti predatori della notte: posizioniamo le reti per i pipistrelli
Una vita tra terra e acqua. Alla ricerca degli Anfibi
Voci nella notte. Registriamo i canti degli uccelli notturni e... non solo!
Elusivi, ma non troppo. Mammiferi: cerchiamoli col faro
Chi è attratto dalla luce? Controllo della trappola luminosa per insetti

Ore 00 - 6
Affascinanti predatori della notte: attività sui pipistrelli
Chi è attratto dalla luce? Controllo della trappola luminosa per insetti

Alle 9 (circa 3 ore, numero limitato)
Scopriamo chi sono gli abitanti del fiume
Una vita tra terra e acqua. Alla ricerca degli Anfibi

Ore 9 - 12
Esploriamo il mondo vegetale. Campionamenti botanici
Passeggiata ornitologica. Orecchie tese e binocolo al collo...
Non meno di 6 zampe. Alla ricerca di Insetti e altri Artropodi
I licheni della Val di Farma. Adattati ad ogni condizione di vita
“Dragoni volanti”. Aiutaci a trovare libellule e damigelle
Il silenzioso mondo dei Rettili. Cerchiamoli con l’esperto

Ore 12 - 14
Non meno di 6 zampe. Alla ricerca di Insetti e altri Artropodi
Esploriamo il mondo vegetale. Campionamenti botanici
Si fa presto a dire fungo. Alla ricerca di funghi

Ore 14 (circa 3 ore, numero limitato)
Scopriamo chi sono gli abitanti del fiume
Una vita tra terra e acqua. Alla ricerca degli Anfibi

Ore 14 - 16
Esploriamo il mondo vegetale. Campionamenti botanici
Si fa presto a dire fungo. Alla ricerca di funghi
I licheni della Val di Farma. Adattati ad ogni condizione di vita

Ore 16 - 18
Là dove volano gli Insetti. Controllo delle trappole aeree
Esploriamo il mondo vegetale. Campionamenti botanici
Si fa presto a dire fungo. Alla ricerca delle specie presenti
Non meno di 6 zampe. Alla ricerca di Insetti e altri Artropodi
Il silenzioso mondo dei Rettili. Cerchiamoli con l’esperto

Ore 18
Fine Bioblitz (count down)

Posted on May 17, 2019 10:00 by msnm msnm | 1 comments | Leave a comment
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Big Forest Find Dawn Chorus Walk - Saturday 18th May

We're excited about our Dawn Chorus Walk taking place tomorrow - meet at 6.25am at the Viridor Woods car park on the Bolton Road (WN4 8TL) and join us for a walk with Leigh Ornithological Society to find out which birds are on site.
We heard a good variety yesterday afternoon so we're looking forward to hearing and seeing who is out and about early in the morning!

Posted on May 17, 2019 10:00 by tracey1712 tracey1712 | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Malaysia Check List

Added around 100 names into Malaysia Check List:
-Taman Negeri Bukit Panchor dan Pulau Jerejak, Pulau Pinang: Pengurusan hutan, persekitaran fizikal dan Kepelbagaian Biologi. (Moss, arthropods, fishes, etc...)

Posted on May 17, 2019 03:49 by tansh91 tansh91 | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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No Cut-Off for this Project

Because I cannot have a beginning and ending point longer than one year, my plan of cutting off this project and starting a new version is not feasible. Therefore, "Sniff, sniff, never mind." This project continues.

Posted on May 17, 2019 02:41 by thebark thebark | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Mojave Desert birds disappearing quickly.

When Steve Beissinger led a team of scientists from UC Berkeley into Southern California’s Mojave Desert, the landscape looked much as it did in photographs taken at the turn of the 20th century by Joseph Grinnell, a famed biologist. But there was one noticeable difference: Many birds were missing.

https://www.avpress.com/opinion/editorial/mojave-desert-birds-disappearing-quickly/article_56c59f0c-7767-11e9-b0f2-6748ca1273fd.html

Posted on May 17, 2019 01:56 by biohexx1 biohexx1 | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Dozens of gray whales are dying on the West Coast as they make their epic Alaskan migration.

At least 53 dead or dying gray whales have washed up on West Coast beaches this spring, a death rate that’s only been seen once before. The great mammals are starving to death and scientists have theories as to why but so far no full explanation.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2019/05/16/whats-killing-grey-whales-they-swim-up-west-coast-alaska/3669039002/

Posted on May 17, 2019 01:54 by biohexx1 biohexx1 | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Dozens of gray whales are dying on the West Coast as they make their epic Alaskan migration.

At least 53 dead or dying gray whales have washed up on West Coast beaches this spring, a death rate that’s only been seen once before. The great mammals are starving to death and scientists have theories as to why but so far no full explanation.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2019/05/16/whats-killing-grey-whales-they-swim-up-west-coast-alaska/3669039002/

Posted on May 17, 2019 01:54 by biohexx1 biohexx1 | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Bioblitz begins soon!

We are anxious to begin exploring and indentifying the biodiversity of flora and fauna on our Green Campus! All are welcome!

Posted on May 17, 2019 01:18 by kaylm kaylm | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Survey of the 1997-2000 Kaipatiki Creek Restoration site, April-June 2019

The Initial Survey for this Project is of the 1997-2000 Kaipatiki Creek Restoration site, ie streambed, banks and adjacent forest to borders of private land where possible.

It follows a series of explorations from June-December 2018 of those areas of the site handweeded from 1997-99, starting at the entry to Witheford Reserve's Native Plant Trail
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/23020882
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/17549721

The Survey is to be ongoing and supplemented with specialist input as available.

The following areas, though of great interest, we will not be able to be include in this survey:
- Cliff faces and steep slopes
- Manawa beds and other saltmarsh communities except as seen from the shore (though we will provide links to some of the observations from a survey by the 1997-99 volunteer group and a botanist)
- Areas hidden by dense undergrowth or fallen trees
- Forest margins bordered by housing below Witheford Drive (these could not be fully surveyed in 1997-99 either, due to the height and steepness of the banks and uncertainty about property boundaries)

The site's nature and history is described here:
https://inaturalist.nz/posts/23979-kaipatiki-creek-restoration-site

Some areas observed and hand-weeded in 1997-99 are now inaccessible to us, their steep contours hidden in dense wild native regeneration with the added uncertain stability of magnificent old rotting trunks fallen at all angles, along, down and across banks and the stream itself. We are studying archive photos to see which trees match the fallen ones. Many will be pines and wattles, but there were some kowhai 30-40cmD on the bank edge that had begun to tilt in 1999. Trees all along the streamside generally lean towards the stream, and many eventually fall into it. Presumably this is to reach light, but is perhaps also related to soil moisture or density? General info on this would be appreciated.

The kowhai on the coastal cliffs were a feature of this area in 1997-99, both above the estuary
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/13216768
and at the highest point in the forest of Witheford Reserve, just below private land which now holds housing:
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/13216741

At least some of the large old kowhai observed 1997-99 are still standing, their tall strong trunks part of the forest canopy
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/17734723
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/17345280
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/17630282

and piercing pohutukawa canopy on the coastal cliffs, the extent of their presence visible only in Spring with portions of canopy yellow with their flowers.

https://inaturalist.nz/observations/15410633

The native coastal kowhai seedlings are still abundant in the forest margins and on estuarine banks, ie alongside the soft-surface bush path created after road construction in 1999 through the Kaipatiki Esplanade Reserve
https://inaturalist.nz/observations?place_id=131524&project_id=kaipatiki-creek-restoration-assessment-2018-20&q=seedling&subview=grid&taxon_id=406092

We are also looking for successful maturations of the kowhai juveniles and seedlings of 20 years ago. Despite the abundance of kowhai seedlings, juveniles were never common, and mostly in the outer margins.

The site's pioneer species, eg ponga, mamaku, wheki, ti kouka, mahoe and kanuka, have matured and increased immensely, and are now interwoven with a replication of the streamside understorey of kiekie, karamu, kanono, hangehange, mapou, Parsonsia heterophylla, kiokio and huruhuruwhenua, along with many juveniles of the pioneer species, and huge mature Parsonsia, kohia and karaeo.
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/17945901

Tradescantia is now the dominant ground cover in many areas previously in kikuyu or other exotic grasses and weeds,
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/23772451

and has returned to some banks from which it was handweeded in 1998
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/18151257

At the streamside, Tradescantia now occupies some banks
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/18149485
that during the restoration project were treeless, exposed to sun and weeds, covered in kikuyu with only scattered Carex geminata and ferns.
(the same bank before restoration)
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/24173518

When restoration began in 1997, the dense, lush streamside vegetation dominating the streamsides today was seen only in places, mainly on the Witheford Drive side of the stream edge, and those patches of native vegetation were separated by wide areas of weeds, though kikuyu-covered areas were much more extensive on the Kaipatiki Rd streambanks, probably cleared and in some cases steepened in road construction
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/23045444

Much of that road edge is today canopied by the 1999 planted natives supplemented, though not greatly diversified yet, by wild regeneration
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/22597842

On the Kaipatiki Rd side of the stream, those vast banks of kikuyu hosted scattered blackberry, ginger, montbretia, pampas, woolly nightshade, wattles, pines, and some Tree privet, along with the Elaeagnus regrowth and numerous dead Elaeagnus and pampas that followed a 3-man, 3 week chemical control operation in 1997 in the upstream area, just before the volunteer manual restoration began.

In the downstream area, banks and retaining walls were created or raised during 1999 road construction, to speed up the progress of road traffic by creating a wide, straight, level road. This has made it difficult or impossible to closely examine the stream and its banks in places.

And on visits to date, mud has been too deep to access the saltmarsh and expolore the bottom of the cliff where 1997-98 surveys found a young Muehlenbeckia complexa. At the top of the cliff, we are keeping an eye out for Clematis forsteri, observed in 1997 both as adult and as seedlings on the cliff, and as seedlings in the streamside forest.

We have been surveying through telephoto lens the canopy of the streamside and opposite bank from the Kaipatiki Roadside forest margin, which also allows glimpses of the streamside vegetation in places between dense understorey, and the streamside where accessible. A few isolated large tree privet, wattle and woolly nightshade, extensive longstanding invasions of Elaeagnus, blackberry, and honeysuckle, and several metres of streamside Palm grass (Setaria palmifolia) have been identified in this way, none of them visible from the lower banks or paths due to the surrounding canopy and understorey, but later confirmed from the streamside as we gradually established their location and found safe passage through deep tradescantia among fallen trees and mamaku fronds along the crumbling and underhung banks.

Pink jasmine was solely responsible for the loss of almost all other vegetation of c. 20m of otherwise gorgeously fern-clad and forested streambank over about 40 years before its total release in the 1997 manual restoration
https://inaturalist.nz/posts/24833-pink-jasmine-in-kaipatiki-creek

The most obvious change to the whole site is the general absence of kikuyu , brush wattle and pampas, replaced by young native trees along the entire length of the roadside.

The native planting has been invaded particularly by tree privet, Moth plant and Japanese honeysuckle.
Honeysuckle, German ivy, moth plant and Madeira vine have already killed some trees, and threaten the remainder.

The unplanted mid-level of the steep banks, between wild regeneration along the streamside below, and the densely planted native trees at the roadside above, are no longer covered in kikuyu but in Tradescantia. The wild regeneration has progressed up the bank in some places at least, to be assessed in more detail for by reference to archive photos.

Less-accessible and less-visible parts of these streambanks host some large single-species invasions, eg approx 10 x 5m of dense Elaeagnus on the roadside bank above part of the stream known during the restoraton project as "Elaeagnus Block" (Zone Ea/Eb) , where in 1998-99 bushes 1-2mH on both banks prevented wading of the stream or walking its banks.
https://inaturalist.nz/posts/24180-elaeagnus-at-kaipatiki-creek

The single Madeira vine observed at the roadside in June 2018 has subsequently not been located, perhaps fallen down the bank towards the stream in the collapse of the tree it was strangling.

In April Madeira was observed flowering throughout the leafless upper branches of a Tanekaha about 10-20mH. Sadly, the Tanekaha is itself fruiting, but most of its upper branches are leafless or dead. Since the Madeira has climbed all the way to its very top, it seems likely the Tanekaha is being strangled, along with adjacent trees which we have not yet been able to view.
https://inaturalist.nz/posts/23717-madeira-vine

Madeira vine has since been observed, again distantly, on the downhill side of this group of trees, from the opposite streambank. Two tanekaha are among the trees on the outer edge of this canopy, and they appear to have at least some healthy branches. The tops could not be seen clearly enough to determine if either is the one viewed earlier from the roadside with Madeira smothering its dying top.

Since witnessing about fifteen years ago the fairly sudden death of a young tanekaha near the start of the Native Plant Trail, we have been keen to learn the cause, and the survival and health of the whole tanekaha population observed on the site 1997-99.
- https://inaturalist.nz/posts/23752-tanekaha-along-the-kaipatiki-creek-in-glenfield

There are several dead and dying beside the path near the upstream entry, while the older one at Rimu Pool further downstream looked vigorous and healthy in winter 2019.

Research at Auckland University suggests tanekaha might be affected by the kauri dieback pathogen. Since the affected tanekaha here are close to a public path, we requested assessment via Auckland Council Call Centre, and expect to be contacted by Biosecurity.

There has been ongoing growth of some Kahili ginger invasions not reached in 1997-99, and many new invasions.

A striking new observation during this Initial Survey has been Phoenix palm seedlings and a possible juvenile, 1 Chusan juvenile and 1 adult, and at least 3 Bangalow palms (Archontophoenix cunninghamii) c.5mH, ID confirmed on iNaturalist.nz by a Palm specialist botanist.

Two Bangalow seedlings have been found on the stream's edge near the upstream footbridge, in Zone Bd, and beside the path to Valecrest Place, just above the footbridge, and about 20 on both sides of the stream around the lower footbridge at Fernlea Rise. All were uprooted during observation.

More background and links to observations of the exotic palms can be found here: https://inaturalist.nz/posts/24179-exotic-palms-at-kaipatiki-creek

Another new threat is Yucca, several specimens of which are well established and inaccessible on steep banks.
- https://inaturalist.nz/observations/17119468
Some seedlings collected frm the streamside in Sept 2018 were provisionally identified as Yucca, entirely uprooted, and are being grown on in pots to confirm their ID and record their appearance during development.

Yucca invasions of Kaipatiki Creek:
https://inaturalist.nz/posts/24846-yuccas-a-21st-century-invasion-of-kaipatiki-creek

Several Tree privet 10mH or more have been observed on the streambank, providing the only canopy at those points. Surprisingly, few juveniles or seedlings have been observed in their vicinity, perhaps limited by shade and Tradescantia. However, those seedlings that do survive, if not controlled, are sufficiently numerous and fast-growing to either create a lot work and environmental disturbance in controlling them as juveniles in a few years, or to replace native trees

Tree privet is now common both under light canopy on the stream banks and in the roadside margin, and without some ad hoc intervention in late 2018 many specimens would have overtopped native trees along the roadside planting's canopy margin. Juvenile tree privet is among the target species of the annual weed control operation to be done by Wildlands shortly in Witheford Reserve, and in progress in the Kaipatiki Esplanade Reserve.

Dozens of Tree privet at 1.5-5 cm spacings on the Coastal Cliff edge near the point have recently been felled. Probably hundreds more on the cliff face itself are not accessible to contractors. In this unusual occurrence, it will be interesting to see how those untreated thin themselves - will some die? Or will they all remain stunted together?
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/17886015
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/17886013

Locally rare species

Tawa
We learned from Wildlands 2017 survey that Tawa is present. As yet we have only observed a few possibly-planted juveniles. Unfamiliar with the species, we would love to be told where to look. It may be that they are not on the site here surveyed, but on the coastal cliff on the Bayview side of thecEsplanadd Reserve.

Kotukutuku
Kotukutuku is represented on the site by 2 adults and several juveniles.
Kotukutuku #1 was recognised in 1998, in better health than now. It was almost leafless in June and August 2018. We note that it is deciduous in southern areas, but this tree has lost limbs and grown smaller, not larger.

Kotukutuku #2 was noted for the first time in May 2019 while watching raw sewage flow jnto the stream during rain. It hangs semi-collapsed from a storwater channel that developed jn 1998 in the collapse of the ground above. The channel becomes a powerful waterfall after heavy rain,carrying with it the overflow from a sewage manhole.
Kotukutuku #2, like #1, is almost leafless.

We will be following the progress of both, as well as any surviving juveniles along the Native Plant Trail:
https://inaturalist.nz/posts/23981-kotukutuku-native-tree-fuchsia-at-kaipatiki-creek

Native herbs, shrubs and groundcovers along the pathsides are discussed here
https://inaturalist.nz/projects/auckland-renh-project-kaipatiki-creek-methodology-trial-of-manual-weed-control/journal/24949-wild-native-pathside-vegetation

We are also re-surveying those areas of interest in our survey of June-September 2018, eg:

- the fate of the Gahnia, Dianella nigra and Carex spp that previously lined the path edge in the H Zone - did they get shaded out? We have yet to re-locate the exact 10m stretch of pathedge they spontaneously revegetated after wattle felling left the area sunlit.

- a number of fern species observed in 1997-99 and not yet seen 2018-19

-Puawhananga, both Clematis forsteri and C. paniculata, present in 1997-99 and common as seedlings in the older forest of the hillside gully

- the long-standing kanono-dieback syndrome now known to be caused by unknown environmental factors

- blackened dead native Basket grass (Oplismenus hirtellus spp imbecillus), beside the bush path

- any increase in the June 2018 observed Alligator weed in the estuary- is salinity controlling it?

- Japanese honeysuckle, wild rose and bougainvillea invasion of estuarine bank above saltmarsh, with honeysuckle reaching the manawa - how many/what species of trees now threatened by the honeysuckle, which is likely to have spread much faster than the others

-new developments and spread of seedling and juvenile native plants, cf the already-observed spread and development of Aruhe, kohia and Parsonsia

- what vegetation emerged and survived in areas of the 1998-99 felling of dense groups of wattles, and of a few individual Monterey pines.

- the recently-observed aggressive reproduction of several Hoheria, presumed planted, on the forest margin in and near the estuarine area

- any occurrence of Sophora microphylla seedlings. This species is not native to the area but was planted along the roadside post-road construction. If reproducing, it will be competing with the abundant wild seedlings in this area of the locally native S. chathamica

To be continued...

Posted on May 16, 2019 23:51 by kaipatiki_naturewatch kaipatiki_naturewatch | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Wild native pathside vegetation

In our ongoing survey we have observed the welcome presence along streamside, bush interior and roadside paths in Kaipatiki Esplanade Reserve and Witheford Reserve of several native herb species outside the path borders, which will not cause problems to path users, and if protected will maintain or produce an ideal dense living groundcover, reducing erosion and dessication, providing habitat for native invertebrates, helping prevent invasion of environmental weeds, and the natural precursors over time to wild native shrubs and trees:

“Esler’s weed” - Senecio eslerii, a ragwort, (v. similar in appearance to Senecio vulgaris “Common ragwort”)

Solanum americanum (similar in appearance to Solanum nigrum “Black nightshade")
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/13880740

“Basket grass” (Oplismenus hirtellus imbeciles) - a soft, fragile grass that is easily compressed, lovely yielding surface to walk on, would not survive frequent trampling.
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/18028485
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/18028486
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/18020066
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/22362151
Basket grass arises throughout forest margins in sun to light shade, tolerating deep pine and tanekaha litter
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/13601480
and is usually present among tradescantia and exotic herbs, and spreads to provide ground cover in forest on hand-weeding, helping reduce invasions of aggressive exotics such as Veldt grass.

Microlaena stipoides "Weeping grass" (looks very similar to Piptatherum miliaceum) - still surviving wild in a few local hedges and road edges, this native grass has been planted in New Zealand and Australia as recreational turf. It is said to be mowable, and hardy enough for moderate pedestrian use
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/25369287
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/20293908
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/21383578

Its larger relative Microlaena avenacea “Bush rice grass” would probably be recognised as native
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/13881930

[NB Both Microlaena stipoides and Basket grass can look superficially similar to the aggressive invasive “Veldt grass” Ehrharta erecta https://inaturalist.nz/observations/19241225]

“Shore lobelia”, Lobelia anceps was observed in 1997-99 only on low estuarine banks and in the saltmarsh margins of coastal cliff
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/13474120

Since 2018 handweeding of exotic herbs and grasses from a wide treeless area near the steps from the downstream footbridge to Fernlea Rise, Shore lobelia’s first straggly stems have been seen in that damp area of run off from housing (and shrub/tree weeds) above the path. This longstanding local native forms attractive dense ground cover in rich soil, with pretty small blue flowers. In May 2019, exotic herbs and grasses, bangalow palms and other invasives were hand weeded from around this occurrence. It is hoped it will spread to adjacent areas presently bare of ground cover.

Haloragis erect, "Shrubby toatoa" was invaluable to the restoration in 1997-99, pointed out to us by Oratia Native Plant Nurseries proprietor Geoff Davidsen as one to be conserved as a nurse-plant for other native seedlings.

A semi-perennial or long-lived annual, it becomes brittle after a year or so and can grow to over a metre high, but the soft young foliage is easily tip-pruned with fingers, or older stems broken by hand or pruned with secateurs.
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/16349483
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/18153578
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/17137642

Carex dissita, lambertiana and uncinata are all present wild in the forest andits margins, and are ideal for pathside
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/18028474
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/17390107
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/17983260
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/17922913
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/17559623

and while Carex geminata is too large and cutty to remain directly adjacent the path, and less common than it used to be before the forest grew up on the Kaipatiki Roadside, some remnants are still providing ideal erosion control and run-off filtration on bank tops where there is no tall vegetation.
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/17583096

Poroporo
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/17152097
and Gahnia lacera
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/18177439
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/15996590
need a little more space, and should be a metre from the path.

Native scrambling fuschsia might be seen wild, but so far has been observed only as a small fragment under harakeke at the Native Plant Trail entry, here:
https://inaturalist.nz/observations/17549732

While many of these superficially resemble common weeds of arable land and gardens, they are part of the healthy, living environment that has long been the appeal of this stream side that for decades had little or no herbicide use. As they decay naturally these plants contribute to humus build up and thus the germination and development of native tree seedlings. Such lush, vibrant environments are in stark contrast to the dead compacted path edges and borders of many North Shore gardens and Reserves, and, though their components are unrecognised by most Reserve-users, the diverse wild plant communities are what make Kaipatiki Creek paths so appealing to joggers and walkers. Several joggers have told us it is their favourite place to run, because the paths are soft and the surroundings beautiful.

Posted on May 16, 2019 22:16 by kaipatiki_naturewatch kaipatiki_naturewatch | 0 comments | Leave a comment
16437 icon thumb

Nouvelle saison, nouvelles observations !

Les espèces fauniques se déplacent en grand nombre au printemps.
Faites-nous part de vos observations d'animaux en bordure des routes de Cantons-de-l'Est !

La Fiducie foncière de la vallée Ruiter et Corridor appalachien

Posted on May 16, 2019 19:48 by corridorappalachien corridorappalachien | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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