Thumb

список

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/51727894
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/37453565
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/45670734
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/30315197
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/40023312
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/42294434
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/45367253
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/45487431
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/46693105
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/44571267
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/54157059
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/34974396
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/35910646
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/45758677
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/44381972
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/42237142
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/28350970
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/28882545
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/30732567
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/30732599
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/31051198
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/43284789
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/43284834
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/43284887
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/43285090
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/43285351
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/43285543
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/43305774
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/43312069
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/43342750
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/43344433
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/43345030
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/43365499
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/43365924
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/43368298
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/43430561
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/43431707
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/43432230
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/43432855
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/43432947
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/44566461
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/44801571
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/44801705
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/45056725
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/45251586
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/45252026
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/45500139
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/45571361
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/45781567
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/45994365
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/45994464
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/46206351
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/46896958
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/45494522
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/31975858
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/45465731
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/30808928
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/30808969
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/30809010
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/34162949
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/29127961
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/35812833
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/45758453
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/44951791
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/37428823
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/29768441
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/45684545
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/45371240
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/44710436

Ingresado el 25 de septiembre de 2020 por apseregin apseregin | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
Thumb

Journal Entry - Ashley

The Shrubby Cinquefoil (aka Dasiphora Fruticosa) is a flowering plant in the Rosaceae family, found in the Angiosperm clade of the Plantae kingdom. It is a eukaryotic organism that is also classified as a seed plant (produce their own seeds).

Angiosperms share many common adaptations in history, including the change in reproduction methods. Since the seeds of water plants were transported through the water current, the plants on land had to adapt. Flowers began to grow on certain plants to attract bee colonies for pollination, which does not require water for the reproduction process to work.

Native to Mexico and the United States, Garden Cosmos have adapted their leaves and petals to survive in areas experiencing high winds. The thin leaves on the Cosmos help prevent the plant from being blown away by the wind, along with their ridged petals, which help create drag.

Literature Cited
Larson, D. (2020, September 11). Plant Adaptations for Living on Land - Prehistoric Earth. Retrieved September 25, 2020, from https://www.fossilhunters.xyz/prehistoric-earth/plant-adaptations-for-living-on-land.html
Leslie, P. (2005). Cosmos Cosmos bipinnatus Mexican aster, garden cosmos. Retrieved September 25, 2020, from http://www.flowersociety.org/Cosmos-plant-study.htm
OneZoom Team. (n.d.). OneZoom: Dasiphora Fruticosa. Retrieved September 25, 2020, from https://www.onezoom.org/life/@eudicotyledons=431495?img=best_any

Ingresado el 25 de septiembre de 2020 por ashmorris ashmorris | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
Thumb

journal entry by Eason Zhou

The science name for the pillbug I picked is Armadillidium Vulgare, it is located in the Animalia Kingdom, Arthropoda Phylum, Crustacea Subphylum, Malacostraca Class, Peracarida Superorder, Isopoda Order, Oniscidea Suborder, Armadillidiidae Family, Armadillidium Genus on the phylogenetic tree.
One common adaptation among the species I picked is they all appear to be the colour of their habitat, but there are counter-examples such as the orange butterfly and white Black-crowned Night-Heron I observed in a mostly green environment. Even though there is no common structural adaptation among the species I observed as long as I know, there is one universal adaptation among all the animals, they all try to flee away from me as soon as they notice my presence. This behavioural adaptation can be adequately explained by natural selection, species that are not scared and flee from a threat are very likely to go extinct, over time all the animals in the wild will conduct the “fight or flight” response to a threat.
One unique adaptation I noticed is that the pill woodlouse has an exoskeleton (probably made of chitin) to guard itself. Moreover, it binds and forms a sphere when I try to pick it up. By do this, the bug has only its exoskeleton exposed to a threat. Pillbugs have developed complementary behavioural and structural to protect itself since they are pretty vulnerable to predators.

Ingresado el 25 de septiembre de 2020 por gsf123456 gsf123456 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
Thumb

Serena's Journal Entry

One adaptation that all observed species in our group project have in common is the presence of green leaves. The most important 'green' chemical in leaves is chlorophyll, which allows the plant to make food in order to grow using water, air, and sunlight.
One unique adaptation for morning glories is their colorfulness. These colorful flowers come in pink, purple-blue, magenta, or white, and are impressive for attracting pollinators.
The Red spider lily, also known as lycoris radiata, is a plant in the onion family, Amaryllidaceae.

Ingresado el 25 de septiembre de 2020 por serenakim15 serenakim15 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
Thumb

Lab 2 iNaturalist Phylogeny and Adaptations

The Jungle Flame, Ixora Coccinea's phylogenic placement is as one of two branches of the most recent specific species with the ancestor jungle flame, the other being Ixora Lagenifructa, and both coming from a branch of a total of 67 species of scarlet jungle flame descendants. The 67 species are a subcategory of scarlet jungleflame and ixora chinesis blooming flowers, and before this, ixora muelleri as a third common ancestor.

All of our observations are plants with the adaptation of blooming flowers that help the plants make seeds for reproduction. These flowers have petals with each a unique color, smell, or other characteristic to attract pollinators and spread their seeds successfully to grow more plants.

The Hibiscus rosa-sinensis plant has the adaptation of developing a cell wall made of cellulose to prevent it from moving at all, to adapt to its environment with the vast amount of rainfall.

Ingresado el 25 de septiembre de 2020 por vodemeulenaere vodemeulenaere | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
87177 icon thumb

Observations of Flora and Fauna by Hugo, Nina, and Weiyi

1 unique adaptation for one selected observation:
Rough Cocklebur:
Fruits of cocklebur is enclosed in bur with hooked spines on the surface, which facilitate their dispersal. Their special hooked spines have them easily attached to fur and skin of passing animals or socks, shoes and cloth of humans. Therefore, these "hitchhikers" are able to travel large distances to grow and reproduce.

1 phylogeny placement for one selected observation:
Zephyranthes candida (White Rain-Lily) is in Zephyranthes, Amaryllidoideae, Amaryllidaceae, Asparagales, Monocots, Angiosperms, plantae.

1 adaptation that all observations have in common:
They all have mechanisms to modulate water loss. Flora have stomatal movement (open and close) to increase and reduce transpiration according to humidity. Most of them also shed their leaves to decrease water loss in dry conditions. Spiders also has exoskeleton to prevent water loss and excessive water loss.

Ingresado el 25 de septiembre de 2020 por weiyi_wu weiyi_wu | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
Thumb

Mangifera Indica

Adaptation: Hypotrophic lenticles. Production of lenticles, during flooding periods, on the tree's trunk. These lenticles help eliminating toxins produced by the plant when it is depending of its anaerobic metabolism to perform some of its activities.

(n.d.). Retrieved September 25, 2020, from http://bioweb.uwlax.edu/bio203/s2012/ruda_chel/adaptation.htm

Phylogenetic tree:

Finding it my names-

Eucariontes>Bikonta>Pteridospermatophyta>Chloroplastida>Embryophyta>Spermatophyta>Angiosperma>Eudicotyledons>Pentapetalae>Malvids>Sapindales>Anacardiaceae>Mangifera>Mangifera Indica

Finding it by pictures-

Ingresado el 25 de septiembre de 2020 por fernandoferrobragalaurindocorreia fernandoferrobragalaurindocorreia | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
87432 icon thumb

Phylogeny and Adaptations

Species: Genus Columba
Common Adaptation:
The main common adaptation that occurs between all of our observation is the fact that all the creatures we have found so far are all of the species are able to fly with wings. This may be due to the fact that as time went on, the only way these species were able to survive were to fly away from their prey or use their wings to fly and survive by eating what they can find as they used their wings to soar around.

Unique Adaptation:
A unique adaptation that happened in the Old World Pigeons, also known as the Genus Columba, is the fact the trait where their shoulders are a lot larger compared to the other birds that are shown in our project. The Genus Columba also has a trait where their head bobbles up and down. Both of these traits are most likely due to the way they fly as they are able to "hover" better than most birds due to their wings adjustments to counter the Earth's gravitational force as they are flying through the air.

Phylogenic Tree Placement:
The city pigeon's descendants have been very hard to trace down ever since it's the first appearance in history. The only leading factor we know is that city pigeons came from the rock pigeon. The range has been narrowed to somewhere around the convergence of Europe, Asia, and North Africa. It was there that the many uses of pigeons appear to have become evident early on leading to the domestication of the rock pigeon by humans between 5000 and 10,000 years ago. Other similar traits include that pigeons seem to have a similar connection to doves as they belong in the same subgroup, Columba.

Ingresado el 25 de septiembre de 2020 por matthewli matthewli | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
86896 icon thumb

Annie-Laurine Sezikeye 5 Identifications

1) Meadow Sage (@isabellezarazua's post in "Flowers Across Canada")

2) Fiery Skimmer (@shawnling's post in "Wildlife in Urban Areas")

3) Impatients (@cathy_lemieux's post in "Flowering_Plants")

4) Chamomiles (@finn602 in "Flowering Plants")

5) Rattlesnakeroots (@shonakelly in "Plant Life on Mt. Royal")

Ingresado el 25 de septiembre de 2020 por annieszky annieszky | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
Thumb

The angiosperms.

All the species observed belong to the angiosperms, having two main adaptations: flowers and fruits.

Flowers: Organs responsible for the reproduction of the angiosperms. This adaptation enables a faster speciation and consequently the ability to more easily adapt and spread over different ecossystems. It also attracts pollinators, such as insects, facilitating reproduction between different organisms.

Fruits: Responsible for protecting the seeds from environmental conditions. It is also a source of food for animals that, in return, carry the seeds to further places where they might be able to germinate.

Ingresado el 25 de septiembre de 2020 por fernandoferrobragalaurindocorreia fernandoferrobragalaurindocorreia | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
Thumb

Brooke Paykin Journal Entry

Phylogeny placement: The scientific name for white snakeroot is ageratina altissima, which is in the tribe eupatorieae that has over 2000 native species; white snakeroot is part of the genius ageratina, the family asteraceae, and the order Asterales. The most recent ancestor of white snakeroot is also the most recent ancestor of 352 species, including apache snakeroot, spreading snakeroot, lesser snakeroot, and sticky snakeroot.

Adaptation for all observed species: All observed species have petals. The color of the petals attracts pollinators.

Unique adaption for one species: The stem and leaves of white snakeroot are very poisonous as they contain tremetol, and when animals consume too much tremetol they die. Animals do not like the taste of the poisonous tremetol, and as a result only eat it as a last resort.

Ingresado el 25 de septiembre de 2020 por brookepay brookepay | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
Thumb

Flowering Plant Observations in Montreal

Hello fellow Naturalists!

For our project we chose to observe one of the many beauties of nature, flowers! As a group we have observed a variety of brightly coloured flowers from around the world.

Flowers have a tendency to make me smile, and one that did a particularly good job of doing so was a Mophead Hydrangea that I found. These beautiful flowers scatter the gardens of many of my family members. Seeing this beautiful flower was a sweet reminder of home from almost 4500 kms away. Mop head hydrangeas, known also by its scientific name Hydrangea Macrophylla are a member of the genus Hydrangeas. When looking at a phylogenetic tree our beautiful hydrangea initially gets split off from animals when the Eukaryotic organisms get split into plants and animals. We obviously follow the plants branch leading us first to the group of plants, alveolate, and brown algae, continuing on to land plants --> vascular plants --> seed plants --> flowering plants --> Eudicots --> asterids --> finally leading us to the hydrangea branch.

One common adaptation that all of my flowering plant species have in common was that surrounding the actual flower there was always a large abundance of foliage (leaves) that was a part of the plant. After diving a little closer into this adaptation, I learned that flowers are actually an adaptation of plants instead of the latter! Flowers aid plants in their effort to reproduce using seeds. Insects can also help move pollen around by picking some up after landing in the plants due to their bright pretty colours and beautiful smells.

Another one of my favourite flowering plants that I came across was common lavender. Through research I learned that common lavender has several adaptations that help this plant thrive in dry Mediterranean equivalent climates. The lavender plant possesses grey/light coloured foliage around its main flowers that helps to reflect sunlight aiding the plant in not absorbing extra heat that in turn helps the plant maintain its store of water.

Hope you learned more about these beautiful organisms!

Works Cited
McGuire, Christina Shepherd. "How do Lavender Plants Adapt." eHow.uk], 14 July 2020, www.ehow.co.uk/facts_8717050_do-lavender-plants-adapt.html. Accessed 24 Sept. 2020.
"A Wildflower Adaptation Study." Elementary Science Program, eschools, 2020,www.espsciencetime.org/AWildflowerAdaptationStudy.aspx#:~:text=Plants%20have%20some%20interesting%20adaptations,flowers%20so%20seeds%20will%20form. Accessed 24 Sept. 2020.

Ingresado el 25 de septiembre de 2020 por humerpat humerpat | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
Thumb

Raymond's Journal Entry

One adaptation that all observed species share is the ability to attract pollinators. This is shown in two of the photos where a bumblebee can be seen landing on the flowers.

One adaptation that only one species had is a flower with a very tubular shape. (The orange flower at the very bottom). I assume this is to inhibit access to the insides of the flower except for certain pollinators.

The observation that I have is the Canadian Goldenrod or Solidago Canadensis. (First yellow flower), It is an Angiosperm that belongs to the Asteraceae family.

Ingresado el 25 de septiembre de 2020 por raymondcao raymondcao | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
83121 icon thumb

Facebook group

Hi all - bit late to the party here but if you are on Facebook and would like to discuss your Great Southern Bioblitz finds, share tips or just get to know your fellow bioblitzers, please feel free to join the Facebook group https://www.facebook.com/groups/1726562764148371/?ref=share
Let me know if you're having any issues joining!
Claudia

Ingresado el 25 de septiembre de 2020 por claudiarose claudiarose | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
80691 icon thumb

COMEÇOU O GRANDE BIOBLITZ DO HEMISFÉRIO SUL

Hoje, sexta-feira, dia 25 de setembro começou o Bioblitz.

Como está a sua programação?
Já definiu as saídas a campo, ou se vai ficar em casa , as buscas da janela, no jardim, na casa?
É útil definir, 5, 10 ou 20 vinte observações por dia.

COMECE HOJE MESMO A PROCURAR ORGANISMOS E TIRAR FOTOS
Dicas:
Gramas: há em geral mais de um tipo de grama. As com sementes pode fotografar. Se necessário coloque a palma da mão por traz das sementes para fotografar e tire uma da planta toda com o tipo de folha e como está no solo. Uma é plantada e as demais não.
Ervas daninhas: Há muita variedade nos gramados, nos canteiros e nos vasos de plantas.
Insetos mortos em luminárias. As vezes alguns estão em bom estado para serem fotografados, apesar de mortos.
formigas, aranhas, mariposas, moscas, mosquitos, besouros, caramujos, lagartixas... A variedade é grande.
Procure que você vai achar bem mais que a sua meta.
Da janela e no jardim você pode fotografar árvores, arbustos e plantas floridas, com frutos ou sementes. Também pode gravar o som de pássaros e cigarras.
Visite este projeto (BRASÍLIA) e/ou os projetos das outras cidades/regiões,
Lembre-se, é preciso se RECONCILIAR COM A NATUREZA.
SÓ QUEM CONHECE CUIDA!
Equipe organizadora!
P.S.: Hoje a noite teremos pela primeira vez a NOITE DE OBSERVAÇÃO DE MORCEGOS!

Ingresado el 25 de septiembre de 2020 por ericfischerrempe ericfischerrempe | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
Thumb

Life Above Us Journal Entry

To begin, the Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) is a eukaryote. Since geese are birds they are place within the class of Aves. Canada Goose in specific belong to the genus of Branta.

One adaption common among my observations were either the ability to fly or stick to vertical surfaces/climb. This is due to the theme of our project of life being above us; these traits are what allow certain life to flourish above us.

Canadian Geese have uniquely adapted to fly in either a V or diagonal line formation, because this species annually migrates this strategy helps promote streamlining and reducing drag within the flock while flying thus more energy is conserved making the migration process easier.

Ingresado el 25 de septiembre de 2020 por brent_yoon brent_yoon | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
85896 icon thumb

COMEÇOU O GRANDE BIOBLITZ DO HEMISFÉRIO SUL

Hoje, sexta-feira, dia 25 de setembro começou o Bioblitz.

Como está a sua programação?
Já definiu as saídas a campo, ou se vai ficar em casa , as buscas da janela, no jardim, na casa?
É útil definir, 5, 10 ou 20 vinte observações por dia.

COMECE HOJE MESMO A PROCURAR ORGANISMOS E TIRAR FOTOS
Dicas:
Gramas: há em geral mais de um tipo de grama. As com sementes pode fotografar. Se necessário coloque a palma da mão por traz das sementes para fotografar e tire uma da planta toda com o tipo de folha e como está no solo. Uma é plantada e as demais não.
Ervas daninhas: Há muita variedade nos gramados, nos canteiros e nos vasos de plantas.
Insetos mortos em luminárias. As vezes alguns estão em bom estado para serem fotografados, apesar de mortos.
formigas, aranhas, mariposas, moscas, mosquitos, besouros, caramujos, lagartixas... A variedade é grande.
Procure que você vai achar bem mais que a sua meta.
Da janela e no jardim você pode fotografar árvores, arbustos e plantas floridas, com frutos ou sementes. Também pode gravar o som de pássaros e cigarras.
Visite este projeto (BRASIL-GERAL) e/ou os projetos das cidades/regiões,
Lembre-se, é preciso se RECONCILIAR COM A NATUREZA.
SÓ QUEM CONHECE CUIDA!
Equipe organizadora!
P.S.: Hoje a noite teremos pela primeira vez a NOITE DE OBSERVAÇÃO DE MORCEGOS!

Ingresado el 25 de septiembre de 2020 por ericfischerrempe ericfischerrempe | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
Thumb

5 IDs

  1. Red Maple: The leaves have closely toothed edges with v-shaped indentations with 3 lobes this suggests a red maple
  2. Sugar Maple: The smooth edges with some notches and red-brown twigs suggest sugar maple
  3. Common Dandelion (taraxacum officinale)
  4. Norway Maple
  5. Red maple: closely toothed edges, with v indentations and three lobes
  6. Billbug Weevils (Genus Sphenophorus)
  7. Mediterranean House Gecko (Hemidactylus turcicus)
    8.Black Maple: 3 lobed with orange-brown twigs that appear to be hanging

  8. Norway Maple: Smooth edges with a few notches and rounded sinuses
  9. Pokers (Genus Kniphofia)

Ingresado el 25 de septiembre de 2020 por aasiyahs aasiyahs | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
86107 icon thumb

Winding Down

I hope all of you have been able to enjoy the magnificent weather and improved air quality. The museum staff have been thoroughly enjoying seeing all of your observations.

Tomorrow, Friday September 25th is the last day to add your observations to the project.

Winners will be announced on Zoom on Saturday September 26, at 3PM after a brief ecosystem presentation.
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84322188715

Please email me if you have any questions.
Cheers,
Jaclyn Schneider
schneider@pgmuseum.org

Ingresado el 25 de septiembre de 2020 por jaclynschneider jaclynschneider | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
Thumb

5 Identifications

Project: Biol 111 Lab 3-Plant Life on Mt.Royal
-Chicory
-Pale jewelweed
Project: Flowers Across Canada
-Common sunflower
Project: Wildlife in Urban Areas
-Greater burdock
-Broad-leaved Goldenrod

Ingresado el 25 de septiembre de 2020 por cathy_lemieux cathy_lemieux | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
Thumb

Coleus scutellarioides

Coleus scutellarioides is a species of flowering plant in the family Lamiaceae, native to southeast Asia through to Australia. Other synonyms used for this species would be Coleus blumei and Plectranthus scutellarioides. Because the general theme of the project is plants and their diversification, all plants share at least one common adaptation that improved their fitness. One of the common adaptations would be the vascular system to distribute water from the roots via the xylem and sugars from the shoots via the phloem throughout the entire plant. On the other hand, Norway spruce has adapted to not requiring large amounts of water by having need-like leaves that have a reduced surface area for water loss, and a thick waxy cuticle that encases the needles, also reducing water loss. This adaptation makes it unique among the other nine species.

Ingresado el 25 de septiembre de 2020 por ehsanadra2 ehsanadra2 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
78934 icon thumb

Off and blitzin'

Hi Surf Coaster Bioblitzers!

The weather hasn't really shone, and may not shine for us this weekend :( But I hope we've all enjoyed the warm and sunny days in the lead up.

It would be great for each of us to put in a good show for observations from a number of different areas:

*Heathland

*Tall forest

*Rockpools

*Beach Comb

*Marine -- chilly for a dive but I might just go there (inspired by 'My Octopus Teacher')

Enjoy all :)

-PossumPete

Ingresado el 25 de septiembre de 2020 por possumpete possumpete | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
87432 icon thumb

Lab 2 - Phylogeny & Adaptations

Phylogeny placement - Kea, Nestor notabilis
Commonly named the alpine parrot, it is no great surprise that the Kea owes its descendance to the Parrot family in the phylogenetic tree, where it separated from other familiar parrots, such as the parakeets and
cockatoo, about 55.6 million years ago. A greater surprise was to note its common ancestor to the royal python, Nile crocodile and kemp turtles, about 300 million years ago, descending from the Sauropsida family.

Common adaptation - Flying Creatures
The flying creatures in our group project had to adapt the properties of their flight depending on their very different local environments; to feed and protect themselves from predators.

Unique adaptation - Red-breasted Dotterel
It was extremely hard to observe the Red-breasted Dotterel, as it has developed a unique camouflage for its typical environment. The female dotterels lay their nests on sandy beaches and, therefore, over millions of years, adapted their plumage to the sandy colours of the beach, as a way to protect themselves and young ones.

Ingresado el 25 de septiembre de 2020 por arielamontagne arielamontagne | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
Thumb

Journal Entry 1

The phylogeny of Bittersweet Nightshade, or scientifically referred to as Solanum dulcamara, lays within the Solanaceae family. This group consists of a wide range of flowering plants containing approximately 2,700 species. They are also eukaryotes.
An adaptation all the observations have in common, is the ability to successfully obtain the required nutrients and water from the soil from their roots. This is critical for plants living on land.
However, a unique adaptation is that it is poisonous for many other species such as humans and other livestock. The toxic traits of this species is a unique adaption that provides potential dangers from some possible predators (like humans) but may be consumed by certain species (like certain birds)

Ingresado el 25 de septiembre de 2020 por chdumont chdumont | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
Thumb

Suggesting 5 Id for observations

  1. Deer-White tailed deer
    The species is the white tailed deer because the picture presented shows similar antler shape and the coat also resembles that of the white tailed deer. The location is also a common place to find white tailed deer.

  2. Bat- Eastern Red Bat
    The species of bat that was observed was the eastern red bat. This is because it exhibited a light brown/reddish fur that is. commonly associated to the red bats and the geographical location in the east coast of America allows us to identify it as the eastern red bat.

  3. Eastern Grey Squirrel- Eastern Grey Squirrel
    The species Id is in fact the eastern grey squirrel because it depicted the long grey tail and slightly dark grey colour fur that is common to this species. It is also in the geographical location where these squirrels are common.

  4. Tree Squirrel- Eastern Grey Squirrel
    The species observed was misidentified as a tree squirrel, however, closer inspections show that it is in fact the eastern grey squirrel because it is displaying a long grey tail and a grey/ dark grey coat on its body.

  5. Mouse Eared Bat- Little Brown Bat
    This species was identified as a mouse eared bat, It is in fact the little brown bat. This is because the bat had a light brown fur and dark brown ears that are pointed upwards, these are all common features for a little brown bat.

Ingresado el 25 de septiembre de 2020 por katherinehemmati katherinehemmati | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
Thumb

iBioBlitz

During this bio blitz, one of my own observed organisms that I was able to track on the phylogenetic tree was Paper Birch (Betula papyrifera).
On the phylogenetic tree, this species can be found under flowering plants, further extending into Pentapetae, then into Fabids, Fagales and finally after its most recent common ancestor the Bog Birch.
Paper Birch is considered a pioneer species, which essentially means that it is one of the first to grow in the wake of a forest’s destruction (typically by fire). This is because their seeds are incredibly light, meaning they are easily carried by the wind to barren or burned areas where they can germinate and populate quickly.
For the project overall, one adaptation that all of the observations had in common was pod structures which contain the seeds. All of the species were skewed between coniferous and deciduous trees, so although the structures themselves (cones vs nuts) are different, they all have very similar caveats for reproduction.

Ingresado el 25 de septiembre de 2020 por oktimmi oktimmi | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
Thumb

Ginkgo

Ginkgo (scientific name: Ginkgo biloba L.) is a plant of the Ginkgo family and the genus Ginkgo. The arbor is 40 meters high and the diameter at breast height can reach 4 meters; the bark of the young tree is shallow and longitudinally cracked, and the bark of the big tree is gray-brown, deeply divided and rough; the crown of young and mature trees is conical, and the old is wide ovoid. The leaves are fan-shaped, with long stalks, light green, glabrous, with many forked juxtaposed veins, 5-8 cm wide at the top, often with wavy nicks on short branches, often 2-lobed on long branches, broadly wedge-shaped at the base. The cones are dioecious, unisexual, born in the axils of the scaly leaves at the top of the short branches, in clusters; the male cones are catkins inflorescence-like, drooping. The seeds have long stalks, drooping, and are often elliptical, obovate, ovoid, or nearly spherical

Ingresado el 24 de septiembre de 2020 por tianxiaox tianxiaox | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
Thumb

Jessamine Mattson Journal September 24 2020

One adaptation shared across the observations is the height of the trees. They have all been able to raise themselves off the ground towards the sun. This enables them to maximize their ability to photosynthesize because they don’t have to compete with lower growing plants, instead casting them in the shade.

One observation with a unique adaptation is the Norway Spruce Tree. This tree is able to function with little water due to its unique leaves. The leaves are presented in a manner that resemble needles which decreases the surface area of the leaf to limit the amount of water lost. Additionally, they are surrounded in a waxy casing that further reduces lost water.

The silver maple is found within the plantae kingdom, the Sapindales order, the sapindaceae family, the acer genus, and its species name is acer saccharinum. On a phylogenetic tree, it can be located among the seed plants as within the soapberry family. It is closely related to the Japanese maple.

Ingresado el 24 de septiembre de 2020 por jessaminemattson jessaminemattson | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
Thumb

Week 0.5: Avoiding Pitfalls in iNaturalist

I'm really enjoying seeing everyone's observations, from all across the United States! A few tips to help you avoid some common iNaturalist pitfalls.

iNaturalist is a great platform for insect identification. But, it is also a social media community of scientists and naturalists. You may notice that you can 'earn' the designation of 'research grade ID', if two or more people agree on an ID for your specimen. This data is actually used by scientists to study biodiversity of various organisms, across the world! Keep this in mind when uploading your observations. Scientists may very well use your observation in their own research. Thus:

1) an observation that does not have date or locality information attached to it is useless to the iNaturalist community. Without this data, there is no way to make any sense of the biogeography or seasonality of the specimen. If your camera does not automatically populate this information, you MUST add it in manually.

2) iNaturalist may give you ID suggestions, all the way down to the species level. However, if you are unsure of what the species level ID is, back off your identification to the family level or to the order level. An iNaturalist community member may pop in and help you with your ID. The iNaturalist algorithm is really good at pointing you towards what your specimen might be . . . but the algorithm might sometimes lead you astray. And, if you're asked to choose among several potential species, please don't guess. It's better to have an identification that is at the broader level of Order or Family . . . that is correct . . . than to have an incorrect identifcation that is to the more specific level of species.

Ingresado el 24 de septiembre de 2020 por gail61 gail61 | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
87432 icon thumb

Phylogeny and Adaptations

Mourning Doves on the Tree of Life
The most recent common ancestor of the mourning dove (Zenaida macroura) and its closest relative the Socorro dove (Zenaida graysoni) lived 681.8 thousand years ago, with the first ancestor of the genus Zenaida emerging ~15 million years ago. Zenaida doves are a part of the Columbiformes order, which comprises of 306 species of doves and pigeons, all of which are included in the Aves class.

Adaptation - Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura)
Turkey vultures have an extremely large olfactory bulb (area of the brain responsible for processing smell), which allows them to have a far keener sense of smell than most birds. This allows them to uniquely hunt prey through smell, putting them at an advantage against other birds of prey.

Common Adaptions In This Project
All the organisms in this project have evolved to have a pair of wings that allow them to take flight. However, butterfly and bird wings developed independently (as opposed to originating from a common ancestor) - this can be seen in crucial differences such as the lack of bones in insect wings.

Ingresado el 24 de septiembre de 2020 por sunjoyxia sunjoyxia | 0 comentarios | Deja un comentario
Más