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joem50

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Marzo 21, 2020 12:50 PM EDT

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joem50

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Julio 13, 2019 02:15 PM EDT

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Leguminosae

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joem50

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Agosto 31, 2017 01:28 PM EDT

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joem50

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Junio 19, 2017 10:47 AM EDT

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joem50

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Algodoncillo Común Asclepias syriaca

Observ.

joem50

Fecha

Agosto 4, 2016 06:18 PM EDT

Descripción

This replaces observation 3870935 which had no picture.
Monarch Butterfly nectaring on Common Milkweed. A little out of focus but I'm working on improving that. This was one of hundreds of Milkweed plants covering more than an acre on either side of the mowed area which they made for a path. I didn't see any evidence of larval activity on any of the plants, no missing or partial leaves.

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joem50

Fecha

Agosto 4, 2016 07:21 PM EDT

Descripción

Growing in the gravel beside the road on the W side. The trilobed leaves on the lower part of the stem identify this as Brown Eyed Susan. There was an apparent state highway planting which consisted of Black Eyed Susan or something similar. There were a sprinkling of Purple Cone Coneflower which is neither native nor naturalized in MD. Across the road were Giant Sunflowers which again were probably planted. Giant Sunflowers were one of the species that the State Highway Administration was looking for more than ten years ago to plant along roadsides. The Brown Eyed Susan was outside the planted area and there were no plants of it inside the planted area. The flowers on the Brown Eyed Susan were about half the width of the Black Eyed Susan.

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Mariposa Monarca Danaus plexippus

Observ.

joem50

Fecha

Agosto 4, 2016 06:18 PM EDT

Descripción

Monarch Butterfly nectaring on Common Milkweed. A little out of focus but I'm working on improving that. This was one of hundreds of Milkweed plants covering more than an acre on either side of the mowed area which they made for a path. I didn't see any evidence of larval activity on any of the plants, no missing or partial leaves.

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Cardos Género Cirsium

Observ.

joem50

Fecha

Agosto 4, 2016 05:38 PM EDT

Descripción

This is the largest thistle flower I've ever seen and it's native. It was about three inches across and about three inches from where it was attached to the pedicel to the top of the flower. The whole plant (and others which I saw later) was less than three feet high which is why it's often called Dwarf Thistle. This one was growing just off the gravel entrance road shortly before the parking lot. I wasn't aware of the second subspecies but I looked it up in Gray's Manual of Botany (Fernald, 1950). The key separates them by the spines on the phyllaries. Part of my observation included grabbing the flower by the lower area which is covered by the phyllaries to see if there were any spines. I couldn't feel any but looking at it closer, there were small, fine, soft spines which had yielded to my fingers so well that I hadn't felt them. While I was there, one of the Clear Wing Moths stopped to nectar, but didn't stay for a photo.

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joem50

Fecha

Julio 30, 2016 02:09 PM EDT

Descripción

Growing next the small gravel parking lot within about ten feet of the road. The plant was glabrous and the lower leaves (as seen in the photo) have no lobes or teeth. When I had something to locate in Savage River State Forest before, they showed the trails. This time I'm guessing.

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Observ.

joem50

Fecha

Julio 20, 2016 05:12 PM EDT

Descripción

Growing in the ditch on the north side of the road. The flowers had pedicels and the leaves were sessile. Winged Monkey Flower (M. alatus) has flowers which are sessile and leaves which have petioles. This makes the flowers on Common aka Allegheny Monkey Flower show up more because the flowers are farther from the stem while the leaves are closer.

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joem50

Fecha

Mayo 27, 2007 12:20 PM EDT

Descripción

An Orchid found and photographed by my niece Miki on a property owned by my sister which is north and west of Tokyo. I believe the Japanese name is Shunran. I don't know whether I identified it to species or just to the Genus and my sister found the species name. I've never been to the property and I can't remember the name of the prefecture so I'm guessing at the location and giving it a 100 kilometer accuracy range.

The Places section now says this is JP, Tropical Asia, Asia. I agree with Asia and Japan but this is not Tropical. I lived for five years during Junior and Senior High School about an hour's local train ride from Tokyo and about the same in the opposite direction from the small town of Hakone at the edge of Hakone National Park, the site of Mount Fuji. The climate was supposed to be like Washington, DC, but it was more like the Coastal Plain of North Carolina, about Zone 8. The location of this Orchid is further north and further inland where it is at least hilly and possibly in the mountains. Anyone who considers Zones 5-7 to be tropical needs to get to a warmer place. MD which contains areas in Zone 6 and 7 is not Tropical. Even Okinawa, where I spent the first three years of Elementary School, is more than 5 degrees of Latitude south of Tokyo is still several degrees north of the Tropic of Cancer and is therefore Subtropical.

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joem50

Fecha

Mayo 20, 2016 04:26 PM EDT

Descripción

Growing on the inside of the lock just upstream of the Olmstead Island Trail which goes to the falls overlook.

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

joem50

Fecha

Mayo 20, 2016 04:39 PM EDT

Descripción

One of the trees planted in the main parking lot between the upper and lower levels. It was probably planted about the time the area became a park. The second photo is a close up of a branch. I think I parked under it that day.

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Cola de Caballo de Campo Equisetum arvense

Observ.

joem50

Fecha

Mayo 20, 2016 04:14 PM EDT

Descripción

Along the tow path just below Catfish Hole on the side away from the canal within view of the river. This has several fresh,fertile stems. I think I cut the head off of one in the photo. I needed to raise the angle a bit to get it in. This is the commonest of the Horsetails in MD and one of the few that has unbranched Fertile stems and branched Sterile stems, both of which can be seen here. It dies back in the fall and sends new stems up in the spring.

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Observ.

joem50

Fecha

Mayo 20, 2016 04:06 PM EDT

Descripción

Along the Billy Goat Trail, Section A?, near the upstream start. You can see the distinct veining in the basal rosette.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Observ.

joem50

Fecha

Mayo 20, 2016 04:01 PM EDT

Descripción

Along the tow path near the upstream start of the Billy Goat Trail, Section A?, on the side away from the canal.
This is one of only two species of Stemmed White Violets in MD. The other, Canada White Violet, prefers cooler areas and isn't known until farther north and west. The distinct Fimbriate Stipules of this one make it easy to identify.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Observ.

joem50

Fecha

Mayo 20, 2016 03:49 PM EDT

Descripción

Along the tow path at Wide Water on the side next from the canal. Notice the closed mouth of the flower if it's in good enough focus. This a key characteristic of this species. I refuse to put these into the Family Plantaginaceae. This mistake needs to be corrected by someone.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Observ.

joem50

Fecha

Mayo 20, 2016 03:32 PM EDT

Descripción

Along the tow path at Wide Water.
After more than forty years of looking at them, I think I've finally figured out how to tell the smaller Solomon's Seal species apart. Part of the problem was my failure to pay more attention to the drawings in Herbaceous Plants of MD (Brown and Brown, 1984) and in their earlier printing in Flora of WV (Strausbaugh and Core) and part of the problem was their use of the term leaf-like bract for the lowest leaf in Common Solomon's Seal (Polygonatum biflorum). The lowest leaf to them on this species and the very similar Downy Solomon's Seal (Polygonatum pubescens - for which you must have to search for the hairs) is the one where the lowest flowers or buds are in the axil.

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

joem50

Fecha

Mayo 20, 2016 03:28 PM EDT

Descripción

Along the tow path at Wide Water on the side away from the canal. The second and third photos show the unripe sori starting to unfold in the typical star pattern for this species. Sorry for the focus.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Observ.

joem50

Fecha

Mayo 20, 2016 03:26 PM EDT

Descripción

Along the tow path at Wide Water on the side away from the canal.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Observ.

joem50

Fecha

Mayo 20, 2016 03:25 PM EDT

Descripción

Along the tow path at Wide Water on the side away from the canal.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Observ.

joem50

Fecha

Mayo 20, 2016 03:23 PM EDT

Descripción

Along the tow path at Wide Water on the side away from the canal.

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

joem50

Fecha

Mayo 20, 2016 03:15 PM EDT

Descripción

Along the tow path at Wide Water on the side away from the canal. The second photo show the unripe, round, exindusiate sori typical for this species.
I am calling this Eastern Rock Fern (Polypodium virginianum) but apparently about twenty-five years ago they found that there were two very similar species, one a diploid and one a tetraploid. If anyone knows a sure way to tell Eastern Rock Fern from Appalachian Rock Fern (Polypodium appalachianum), the diploid, let me know. I've already heard about the minor differences in shape and have to try it to see if I can actually tell which is which.

Fotos / Sonidos

Observ.

joem50

Fecha

Mayo 20, 2016 02:59 PM EDT

Descripción

This is only the second place that I have seen one of MD's five native Corn Salads. This is along the tow path downstream from the falls next to the bridge at the upstream end of Wide Water. There are dozens of plants of this annual for the first twenty feet of the bridge. Two of the native species are on the rare list for MD. With there tiny flowers, they are usually overlooked. The key to species needs the indehiscent fruit.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Observ.

joem50

Fecha

Mayo 20, 2016 02:52 PM EDT

Descripción

Along the tow path just above Wide Water on the side away from the canal near the boulders which block the view of the turtle pond. Apparently a Lumper has been at work and moved the Waterleaf Family (Hydrophyllaceae) into the Borage Family (Boraginaceae). Somebody needs to hook Boraginaceae to an Order.

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Oreja de Ratón Cerastium arvense

Observ.

joem50

Fecha

Mayo 20, 2016 02:47 PM EDT

Descripción

Along the tow path just above Wide Water on the side next to the canal near the boulders which block the view of the turtle pond.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Observ.

joem50

Fecha

Mayo 20, 2016 02:39 PM EDT

Descripción

Along Berma Road near the stop lock bridge. These are closely related to Wingstem (Verbesina alternifolia) but have broader, opposite leaves in addition to the winged stems. I've been watching this patch for well over a decade and have seen it all stages of growth from the first sprouts from the roots in spring to the standing dead stems with seed heads.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Observ.

joem50

Fecha

Mayo 20, 2016 02:36 PM EDT

Descripción

Just up the trail between Berma Road and the Gold Mine Area. The Fertile fronds are visible here and had unripe sori in the typical chevron pattern.

Fotos / Sonidos

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Observ.

joem50

Fecha

Mayo 20, 2016 02:27 PM EDT

Descripción

This Fern is dimorphic and has arching Sterile fronds and more upright Fertile fronds. The last third of the Fertile frond is where the sori are.

Fuentes:: Átomo